Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in RC Humanities (Division 865)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for RC Humanities.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements.

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE WAIT LIST PROCEDURES

Residential College students are given priority in all Residential College courses during the Early Registration and registration periods, and from waitlists. RC courses which satisfy specific Residential College graduation requirement are reserved for RC students only (e.g., RC language courses).

Waitlists of Residential College courses are maintained in the Residential College Counseling Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad. When a course fills, students should contact the RC Counseling Office (647-4359) to be placed on a waitlist if one is being maintained. RC sections of LS&A coursesThese sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RC Hum. 214. Fundamentals of Narrative Fiction.

Comparative Literature

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Goodenough (lizgodde@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How have human beings in our civilization chosen to present themselves and the stories of their lives? What motivates a person to tell his or her story? This course examines a variety of short narratives and novels from acknowledged classics of historical fiction and the bildungsroman to such popular forms as Westerns and mysteries, romances and children's fables to look at story-telling as a reflection of social values and as a mode of seeing, thinking, being and becoming. What stage of development or type of experience is formative and which provide the most useful lens from which to view the whole? What is the impact of gender, nationality and race on the cultural construction of selfhood? How do writers invent the impossible? Why must they lie to tell the truth, write beyond the ending, and make up stories about stories within stories? How do we decide what these stories mean?

Required Texts: Julia Alvarez, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents; James Barrie Peter Pan in Kensington Garden; Ann Charters, The Story and its Writer (4th ed); A. Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles; Louis L'Amour, The Ferguson Rifle; George MacDonald, The Golden Key; Fae Myenne Ng, Bone; Tim O'Brien, If I Die In A Combat Zone and The Things They Carried; Tillie Olsen, Tell Me A Riddle; and Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse.

Evaluation will be based on participation in discussion and four short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 242. Creative Adaptation: Fact Into Fantasy.

Creative Writing

Section 001 Creative Non-Fiction

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~balducci/creative_adaptation.html

Creative non-fiction is information-based writing for general audiences. Free-lance writers, journalists and technical writers are assigned to write, translate, interpret, or edit texts which explain or describe specialized subjects in ordinary language that non-specialists can understand. These assignments can range from advertisements and news reports, to articles aimed at more sophisticated readers in periodicals such as The New Yorker. Even semi-specialized publications such as Scientific American, Car and Driver, and the New England Journal of Medicine use non-technical language which informed amateurs as well as professionals can comprehend. In classical literature, works such as The Odyssey, MacBeth, The Aeneid, and The Divine Comedy were inspired by historical events and figures. Gettysburg, Joy Luck Club, and Age of Innocence are recent films which were adapted from historical or literary sources. Aladdin and Beauty and the Beast and many other Disney animated feature films are adaptations from literary sources. TV docu-dramas have been created about figures in the news, such as Amy Fisher and Jessica DeBoer. Biographies, autobiographies, translations, and musical adaptations as well as many non-fiction children's books are, in fact, blendings of fact and fantasy.

All professions reward good communication skills. One's ability to understand, synthesize, and communicate facts to others is as necessary to a doctor as it is to a writer. With this in mind, students should find "Creative Non-Fiction", with its combination of the challenge of research and the pleasure of self-expression, to be a valuable elective.

Projects students will pursue will include adaptations from one medium to another; translations from one language to another or bilingual texts; science/math/history for children; personal essays/interviews/oral history; autobiographical fiction, poetry, or drama; folklore/oral traditions into fiction, picture books, animation.

Students will complete either one long (25-30 page) project or three short papers (10-15 pages each) on a related theme. Two drafts will be required.

NOTE: This class can be useful to juniors in anticipation of Honors Thesis work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001 Students Seeking Two Hours of Credit, See Instructor. Section 001 Prerequisite: Intermediate Ability in Playing an Orchestral/Band Instrument

Instructor(s): Maria Barna (barkar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No audition is required. All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles can enroll for one or two hours of credit. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of strings and winds; brass quintet; string quartet; woodwind quintet, and some other duos and trios, including piano and harpsichord.

Requirements for one credit hour consist of participation in two ensembles; for 2 credits one must participate in the large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week and participation in one or more concerts per term, if appropriate. Course may be used to meet the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 Across Borders: The Imagery of the East in the Music of the West

Instructor(s): Inna Naroditskaya (innarod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to place the European musical tradition within the context of the different musical cultures. The course will combine the ethnomusicological and musicological approaches by discussing European music not as an isolated phenomenon, but as a constant exchange between Eastern and Western cultures. The idea of "West" and "East" proposed in the title of the course will be deconstructed by exploring the question of Diaspora the spread and intermixture of various cultures, particularly Mediterranean.

This course is a chronological excursion though different historical periods, with discussions of musical types, genres, composers and pieces. At the beginning of the course, we will explore chronologically both influences and representations of the East. For instance, we will study how, in later centuries, the reorganization of Christian church and the formulation of Gregorian chant coincided with the emergence of Islam and the tradition of Quranic recitation. We will also discuss how the art of the European troubadours parallels the tradition of the Jewish hasan, Turkish ashiks, and Arabic poets.

We will observe that the separation of East and West surprisingly increased in the age of the geographic "discovery" when the cultural connections began to appear on a different level. For example, during the European renaissance, baroque and especially classical periods, musicians repeatedly rediscovered the imagery of the East. In the romantic era, the panorama of European music expanded, including eastern regions such as Hungary and Russia. The latter had its own "East" represented in Russian classical music.

We will find out that at the end of the nineteenth century, like Gauguin in art, many musicians and composers sought their identities in historical or territorial distance. The interest to the distant cultural idioms became a signature of the musical modernism. Finally, we will enter the twentieth century which began with a new musical Diaspora, including Stravinsky, Schoenberg, and many others. (Later even the popular attempted to connect West and East.)

It is hoped that this course will provide students with knowledge of European musical history in the context of world musical diversity. This course will give students a sense of their place in an historical/geographical/cultural continuum.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 Women's Choral Ensemble

Instructor(s): Wendy Looker (wlooker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music from the vast Women's Chorus Repertoire. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 002 Mixed Choral Ensemble

Instructor(s): Wendy Looker (wlooker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Four-part works from a variety of musical styles are rehearsed and prepared for performance in concert. Meets twice weekly. Vocal skills, sight singing, musicianship and ensemble singing are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 280/English 245/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Instructor(s): Robert Knopf (robknopf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 282. Drama Interpretation I: Actor and Text.

Drama

Section 001 Ibsen and Chekhov

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During this term we will be studying two dramatists of early modern drama: Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekhov. By working of their plays as actors we will be learning much about the development of naturalism as a literary style and an acting theory. Ibsen had a profound influence on Victorian society and was a proponent of "realistic acting" and Chekhov's contemporary, Constantine Stanislavsky, a co-founder of the Moscow Art Theatre was the pioneer of "method acting".

Our approach will be to take one major play by each playwright and explore it through scenework, then to look at two or three other plays by the same writer, as well as doing dramaturgical reports on the period and place of the drama. We will start with Ibsen's Hedda Gabler, then move on to scenes from A Doll House and The Master Builder. Our work on Chekhov will focus first on Uncle Vanya, then move to larger sections from The Seagull and Three Sisters which will constitute our end of term production.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 305(RC IDiv 257). Cultural Confrontation in the Arts.

Arts and Ideas

Instructor(s): Susan Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Minorities are subjected to misrepresentation, efforts to rob them of their cultural identity, internal colonization, and racial prejudice. This course focuses on the aesthetic responses of different minority groups when they come into contact with the dominant culture. The emphasis is on an intensive engagement with representative texts or visual images that are produced at such "moments" of confrontation. Minority responses to the confrontation include conflict, compromise, assimilation, and resistance. Examples of fiction, film, music, dance, paintings, and poetry will be presented in order to encourage an awareness of cultures other than one's own. Guest speakers from a variety of academic departments in LS&A. will give many of the lectures. The course focuses on minorities in the U.S. (Asian-Americans, Latino-Americans and African-Americans), with a few lectures devoted to minorities in other areas of the world. Course objectives include: (1) to foster an awareness of the cultures of others by letting them speak in their own voices and by learning to listen carefully both to what is said and how it is said; (2) to understand that the responses of these cultures to the impact of the dominant culture have to be explored through questions of form and language, and that these questions are often related to the undermining of tradition and the crisis of cultural identity; (3) to help students refine their skills in verbal and textual analysis (4) to encourage students to reflect on how the issues of the course are played out in their own lives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 309. Classical Sources of Modern Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 The Heritage of Greece

Instructor(s): Cynthia Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the confrontation between myth and philosophy which, from the 6th century BC on, structured the intellectual heritage of Greece. By myth is meant the fables of the poets, primarily Homer. One should not assume that these stories provide a clear window onto ancient religion; instead the relation between mythology and religion was problematic and unstable. The philosophers, beginning with the presocratics, intervened disruptively in this problematic relation either to magnify the difficulty or to resolve it on their own terms. Philosophical speculation concerning the nature of space and the role of the gods in shaping or controlling space challenged mythology, but also had implications, sometimes troubling, for ancient religion especially the rituals of prophecy and sacrifice. To contest these rituals was to challenge the site and expression not only of religious, but also, because of the imbrication of ancient cult and the state, of political power.

Power (simultaneously religious and political) in the ancient world, could be concentrated and disseminated by means of the image. Visual objects occupied a cultural category quite different from modern conceptions of "art". To what extent were ancient painting, sculpture, or architecture invested in religious, philosophical, or political models? Did they merely reflect or did they actively participate in the debate?

The "Greek tradition" in art, literature, and philosophy is conventionally understood as limited to its pagan expression. This course will take a somewhat wider view. The terms of that tradition the literary forms, the philosophical preoccupations, the modes of visual representation and the difficult status of the image were in fact taken up not only be learned Jewish commentators and critics, but also by Christian intellectuals of the Byzantine period who viewed this tradition as their own. Their participation in and contribution to the Greek heritage deserves recognition.

  1. Space and design:
  2. Sacrifice and prophecy: the construction of sacred space:
  3. Sacred space: challenge and revision:
  4. Wisdom, images, idolatry: rethinking the heritage of Greece:
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 312/Slavic Film 312. Central European Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Issues

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Slavic 312.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 318. Critical Approaches to Literature.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 American Writers and Painters: Figure; Interior; Landscape

Instructor(s): Cynthia Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Contemporary critical and cultural analysis has problematized traditional reference points in painting and writing: the figure, the interior, the landscape. As definable entities, as locatable sites, as arenas of human habitation and desire, these reference points seem to have lost their anchoring power.

This course will examine a group of American writers and painters whose works occur on the threshold of this change. "Figure, interior, landscape" unfold within their works as troubled, anxious, ruptured presences. We will approach these ruptures in theoretical as opposed to sociological terms as effects which occur on the margins of a genre, then migrate to the center.

One question (although not the only) that these works ask is, given this troubled environment, what becomes of the religious sense the ancient tie that binds the human subject to nature and to nature's god? Can it be explained away, argued, or shamed into non-existence? Were the traditional genres underwritten by religious categories of thought or representation? When these categories collapse, what is the status of the remnant?

Another and possibly related question is the problem of beauty. What is its origin? Its goal? Is it an epiphenomenon of language? A mirage of mirages? The advent of terror that "we are just able to bear?" And how do figures, interiors, and landscapes stand in relation to this enigmatic presence?

As a framework for asking these questions, we will use not only contemporary critical writing, but also a short treatise of St. Thomas Aquinas on the nature of being. At first glance, it seems anomalous to turn to a medieval thinker to supply the conceptual context for a series of 20th century works. We will use Aquinas, therefore, not to explain these works, but to serve as a background against which to see their difference, as a point of departure, of resistance, even of rejection as perhaps as their invisible ground.

J.D. Salinger, A Perfect Day for Bananafish, Franny and Zooey;
Edward Hopper, paintings;
Sylvia Plath, The Colossus;
Mark Rothko, painting;
Flannery O'Connor, The Violent Bear it Away;
Barnett Newman, paintings;
Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita;
Jasper Johns, painting;
Thomas Aquinas, On Being and Essence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 319. Topics in Film.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Writing Film Criticism. Required Film Screening M, 7-10 P.M. Meets with Film-Video 340.001

Instructor(s): Hugh Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 340.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 322. Advanced Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~balducci/advanced.html

Advanced Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults is an informal Seminar designed to build upon skills and themes developed in RC Humanities 222 "Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults." The casual setting of the seminar is intended to encourage interaction and collaboration among students. Weekly paper swaps allow students to become familiar with the writing styles and interests of others in the course. Support and suggestions, as well as collaborations (when feasible) are encouraged. Students are expected to support their theories with articles, books, scripts and other material.

NOTE: This course will be taught in association with the campus wide theme, THE DIVERSITY SEMESTER.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Narrative in the Ancient World: The Art of Story-Telling. Meets with History of Art 394.004

Instructor(s): Beth Dusinberre

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/394-004.html

How did people in the ancient world tell stories? How did they manipulate time, characters, the place or pace of telling to increase the impact of a tale? Did narrative techniques differ between spoken and written stories, between poetry and prose? Stories can also be told with art rather than words, as visual narratives. Can we think about artistic narratives in the same way as verbal ones? This course will consider ancient narratives in the literature and art of the ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome. We will examine ways in which ancient story-tellers manipulated their narratives for greater emphasis, reconstructing our ideas of narrative to deal with visual narratives as well as verbal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 341. Latin American Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 This course is taught entirely in English; however, a knowledge of Spanish is welcome

Instructor(s): Eliana Moya-Raggio (elmoras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From the outside, especially from the perspective of the United States or Europe, Latin America sometimes appears as picturesque or even folkloric; it also appears as an homogeneous entity. Nevertheless, in spite of some commonalities of history and language, each part has its own past as well as its own present, a particular social context and a language that modulates and resonates differently. It is possible to say that the homogenizing factor comes always from the outside.

The differences found among the many parts is also the distance beyond the geographical one in language and vision, between a writer of Caribbean Latin America and one from the Southern Cone. Yet, writers in Latin America have expressed considerable concern for the continent as a whole, recognizing its mestizo characteristics not only in relation to race, but also in relation to influences and aspirations. They recognize that although not one of them may represent the whole, all of them contribute to the emergence of common language.

To find that common language and concern will be the focus of this class; we will do that through some of the major voices of Latin America. The list might include: Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, Alejo Carpentier, Augusto Roa Bastos, Marta Traba and Elena Garro and/or others. This course is taught entirely in English; however, a knowledge of Spanish is welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 350. Creative Musicianship.

Music

Section 001 Creative Musicianship. Interest in Music Theory and Composition

Instructor(s): Jane Heirich

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This music theory-composition course is designed to give students the skills necessary to understand and to create music as a form of personal expression. Nothing is assumed in the way of musical background, and those who are apprehensive about composition will be welcomed and guided through a process that enables them to create music of their own. Many students in the class will have had instrumental or vocal performance experience; others may have taken music theory or history classes; and some of them will already be composers. All are welcome. Fifty students will be accepted. Each student works at her/his own level on the musical element under consideration (rhythm, melody, harmony). The course meets for four class hours, and students should plan to spend a minimum of 10-12 hours per week preparing materials for the Humanities 350 class. There will be a programmed theory text required, to be selected according to your own level of experience. The accompanying lab (RC Humanities 351) is required unless excused by the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 351. Creative Musicianship Lab.

Music

Section 001 Required for those taking 350; Others Welcome

Instructor(s): Jane Heirich

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 350. (1-2). (CE).

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a required lab course to be taken with Humanities 350, however, it can be taken by itself. It will deal with the three basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony) through music reading, notation, singing, use of ear-training tapes, and computer lab programs. The class will be divided into three or four sections according to ability and experience levels. Each section meets together as a group, and students will also work individually and with a lab partner. It may be elected for either one or two credits, depending on the amount of work one chooses to do. Attendance at both Tuesday and Thursday class sessions is necessary whether you are taking the lab for one or two credits. Advanced students may be exempted from taking this lab on permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 360. The Existential Quest in the Modern Novel.

Comparative Literature

Instructor(s): Fred Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior/senior standing. (4). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him." (Nietzsche)

"If there is not God, then everything is permitted." (Dostoevsky)

"Everything that exists is born without reason,
Continues to live out of weakness,
and dies by chance." (Sartre)

Existentialism combines the investigation of major issues in the history of Western philosophy with daily problems of intense personal concern. In this course, existentialism will be viewed as a literary as well as a philosophical movement united by a number of recurrent and loosely related themes: (1) Theological: the disappearance of God; the condition of being "thrown" into an indifferent and ultimately absurd universe; man's encounter with nothingness beneath the floor of everyday reality revealed when familiar objects and language drop away. (2) Psychological: man's imperfection fragility, and loneliness; the feeling of anxiety and despair over the emptiness of life and the terror of death; arguments for and against suicide; human nature as fundamentally ambiguous and hence not explicable in scientific thought or in any metaphysical system; the absence of a universally valid morality; and human nature as undetermined and free. (3) Social: man's rebellion against the inhumanity of social institutions that suffocate the "authentic self"; the escape from individual responsibility into the "untruth of the crowd." (4) Finally, man's various attempts to transform nihilistic despair into a creative affirmation of life.

Philosophic texts by Pascal, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Buber, and Heidegger; fiction by Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Camus, Sartre, and Kafka. Two examinations and one term paper required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 389. The Modern Theatre.

Drama

Section 001 Modern Theater: Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary American Drama

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 280. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This four credit course will explore plays from contemporary American drama which examine gender and sexuality. A great deal of emphasis will fall on drama written by women, by writers of color, and by artists in the gay and lesbian community. The reading list may include established works such as Ntosake Shange's For Colored Girls... and Tony Kushner's Angels in America, but will include a range of contemporary writers and performance artists.

Coursework will demand close reading of the plays and ongoing personal response to the material through a journal. Written work will also include critiques and creating original pieces. The emphasis in the course is on understanding the texts by performing them, so scene and monologue rehearsal is a central part of the process. Students with an interest in directing are encouraged to enroll, as our end of term project will be a mini-festival of these plays in workshop production.

The course will deal with work which may challenge traditional attitudes about gender, sexuality and race. Students should be aware of this and should also have some previous experience with acting, either through Actor and Text I or a comparable course. First time actors and directors should schedule an interview with the instructor before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 389. The Modern Theatre.

Drama

Section 002 Modern Theater: Theater in English of Colonized Peoples

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 280. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

R&E Foriegn Lit Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of representative modern plays, all originally written and performed in English, by non Anglo-Saxons belonging to nations formerly or currently members of the British Empire. These works examine, in one form or another, the problems of colonialism, racism, and Third World or minority self-indentity. Guest background lectures by experts in particular areas will supplement extensive stage-oriented exploration of the plays and evaluation of their particular contributions to contemporary drama. Short critical papers, individual research into other relevant playwrights, and participation in a culminating performance project are the principal requirements. Among the areas, playwrights, and plays covered:

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Psychoanalysis and the Modern European Novel

Instructor(s): Fred Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

First, this course will offer a basic introduction to the Freudian and Jungian theory of human psychology and psychopathology; the nature of the personal and collective unconscious; theories of the instincts and their transformation; the development and function of the ego; the mechanisms of defense and repair, and theories and methods for the interpretation of dreams and works of art. Second, this course will conclude with two studies in applied psychoanalysis. (1) Kafka and Freud: Kafka's childhood and his relationship to his father will be examined in light of the trauma of the bourgeois nuclear family as described by Freud. Also, the Freudian theory of dream interpretation will be applied as a technique for the analysis of Kafka's literary fantasies of guilt, punishment, and suicide. Texts: Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams; Kafka's short stories and The Trial. (2) Hesse and Jung: "the search for identity" of Hesse's protagonists will be examined in the perspective of Jung's individuation process, the persona, the shadow, archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, and man's quest for mystical illumination. Texts: selections from The Portable Jung; Hesse's Siddhartha and Steppenwolf. Kafka's and Hesse's lives will also be analyzed from the perspective of theories of neurosis and artistic creativity. Midterm and final exams, and term paper required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 002 The Hero as Outsider, Outcast, or Outlaw

Instructor(s): Hugh Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We all have or need heroes. In this course we ponder why this is the case and investigate the character of heroism. The heroes we will study, however, are not those that mainstream society generally regards as heroes, but men and women who either reject mainstream society (e.g., Dostoyevsky's Notes from Underground, J. Conrad's The Heart of Darkness, St.-Exupéry's Night Flight, D. H. Lawrence's The Man Who Died, C. McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses, K. Hulme's The Bone People), or who mainstream society rejects, regarding them as either outsiders/foreigners (e.g., R. Kluger's The Sheriff of Nottingham, J. Kosinski's The Painted Bird), as outcasts (e.g., E. Gaines' A Lesson Before Dying, A. Fugard's Master Harold...and the boys), or as political, sexual, or intellectual outlaws (e.g., M. Puig's Kiss of the Spider Woman, B. Brecht's Galileo, M. Ritt's film The Front [with Woody Allen]). In a few cases, the heroes we examine are saints or eccentrics that society simply writes off as "crazy" (F. O'Connor's Wise Blood, M. Scorsese's The King of Comedy, or Woody Allen's Zelig ).

As the list indicates, some of the works we will examine are films. These will be shown outside of class, but discussed in class. The student will be evaluated on the basis of class discussion, two or three papers, and a midterm and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 411. Translation Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Language and Translation Seminar

Instructor(s): Erika Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Reading proficiency in a foreign language. Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will begin with an inquiry into the nature and function of language as it defines man and allows him to "translate" his experience of being in the world to himself and others. For this we will examine and discuss a number of influential philosophical views on language. Next we will undertake an exercise in intersemiotic translation, from one artistic medium into another. Following this we will examine the diverse forms of "translations" within the same language, such as interpretations, reformulations and adaptations from one literary genre into another. The rest of the term will be devoted to the theory and praxis of translation between two different languages. Participants are asked to select a translation project of their own, suitable to their foreign language abilities and personal interest. We will read excerpts from the writings of Heidegger, Witgenstein, Benjamin, Jackobson, Chomsky, Lefevre, and Derrida.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 452/Russian 452. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Instructor(s): Andreas Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian 452.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 475/Chinese 475/Phil. 475/Asian Studies 475/Hist. of Art 487. The Arts and Letters of China.

Arts and Ideas

Instructor(s): Yi-tsi Feuerwerker (ymfeuer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/winter99/487-001.html

See Chinese 475.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 481. Play Production Seminar.

Drama

Section 001 Samuel Beckett (Late Plays). Prerequisite: Introduction to Theater & 2 Drama Courses or Permission of Instructor

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course centers on the research and rehearsal of a production of major work by a major playwright. Extensive study of the playwright, his works, and cultural and theatrical background will merge with extended rehearsal of a selected work leading to a fully realized production in the RC Auditorium at the end of the term. Each class member will participate in some aspect of practical production, whether in acting, design, tech., assistant directing or dramaturgy, and be responsible for some aspect of research into the play/playwight (stage history, critical reception, sources, biographical concerns, key actors, etc.

Our designated playwright is Samuel Beckett. Early on students will work with extended scenes from Waiting for Godot and Endgame and sample Beckett's prose in independent readings. The performance piece(s) will be selected from Beckett's later (and shorter) works, particularly those involving female characters such plays as Happy Days, Come and Go, Footfalls, Rockaby, Catastrophe according to the strengths and interests of the production ensemble created by the class itself.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 11:33 AM on Fri, Feb 5, 1999.