Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in RC Interdivisional (Division 867)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for RC Interdivisional.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements.

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE WAIT LIST PROCEDURES

Residential College students are given priority in all Residential College courses during the Early Registration and registration periods, and from waitlists. RC courses which satisfy specific Residential College graduation requirement are reserved for RC students only (e.g., RC language courses).

Waitlists of Residential College courses are maintained in the Residential College Counseling Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad. When a course fills, students should contact the RC Counseling Office (647-4359) to be placed on a waitlist if one is being maintained. RC sections of LS&A coursesThese sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RC Interdiv. 216. Gödel, Escher, Bach.

Section 001 Prerequisite: High School Algerbra and Geometry

Instructor(s): John Lawler (jlawler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school algebra. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/geb.html

Douglas Hofstadter's 1980 book Gödel, Escher, Bach is one of the most popular unread books in history. Subtitled "A Metaphoric Fugue on Men, Machine, and Minds in the style of Lewis Carroll". it won the Pulitzer Prize and enjoys continuing sales, but far more people have bought it than have actually read it, not to speak of understanding.

This course will discuss many of the themes that run through the book: mathematics, computing, artificial intelligence, metaphor, creativity, pattern and structure, logic and meaning, art, music, history, and consciousness. The goal will be to Improve our critical understanding of these and other topics by providing the mathematical, historical, logical, and scientific background for evaluating Hofstadter's oeuvre. We will attempt to actually finish the book, and will read a number of collateral works on the foundations and history of logic and mathematics.

Active participation in class, and in a computer conference, are course requirements, in addition to other assignments.

Required textbooks:

Plus course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Interdiv. 240/Environ. Studies 240. Big Questions for a Small Planet: Introduction to Environmental Studies.

Instructor(s): Catherine Badgley (cbadgley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Environmental Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

RC Interdiv. 320. Technology and Culture in the Twentieth Century.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Hecht

Prerequisites & Distribution: None, but one prior course in the social sciences is recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the complex relationships between technology and culture in the 20th century. Topics include: the growth of large-scale technological systems such as electric power, telecommunications, and nuclear weapons; the role of technology in the spread of consumer culture; ways in which ideas about gender and race shape technological change; technological disasters; and more. Much of the focus is on America and Europe, but attention will also be paid to non-Western nations. Readings will come primarily from a course reader. One session each week will be devoted to class discussion. The second session will alternate between films, field trips (including a visit to the Henry Ford museum), and other activities. Assignments: weekly reading, informal responses to readings and films, 1-2 class presentations, and one major group project (15-20 pages of writing for each student in a group).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Interdiv. 330. Information Technology and Global Politics.

Instructor(s): Paul Edwards

Prerequisites & Distribution: None, but some experience with computers, Internet, and World Wide Web is recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What do the Cold War, the World Wide Web, multinational corporations, and global warming have in common? All are part of the globalization of power and knowledge, one of the major forces shaping the modern world. But equally important, without computers and other new information technologies, none would exist as we know them. This course explores information technology as the fundamental infrastructure of globalization. We will cover four major topics: war and military technology; the Internet, World Wide Web, and other global networks; multinational corporate power, and global environmental problems.

Major texts: Castells, The Rise of the Network Society; Edwards, The Closed World: Computers and the Politics of Discourse in Cold War America; Rochlin, Trapped in the Net; Edwards and Miller, Changing the Atmosphere: Science and the Politics of Global Warming.

Several films will be screened. Assignments will include short essays, a group project, class presentations, and a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Interdiv. 350. Special Topics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in an associated course. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Interdiv. 351. Special Topics.

Section 001 Psychological Development and Mental Health Issues During College and Young Adult

Instructor(s): Hank Greenspan (hgreensp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Drawing on psychological theory, case studies, and the arts (primarily theatre and film), this course will explore major themes of psychological development during young adulthood. Topics will include: changing relationships with family and the process of "leaving home"; personal and social foundations of identity; the development of intimacy in friendships and romantic relationships; the functions of student peer culture; transitions between school and work; mental health crises and the uses of counseling, psychotherapy, and psychiatric treatment during young adulthood; resources and lack of resources for psychological development and psychological emergencies within the university; and the wider meanings of "adulthood" to which "young adulthood" is supposed to lead. While discussion will often be more general, it will be tested against and informed by the experiences of the young adults who are students in this course.

Class formats will vary and include brief lectures; seminar discussion; presentation and analysis of case studies; and exploration through film, dramatic reading, and informal role play generated by class members. Each student will be responsible for three or four brief case studies based on interviewing, and learning how to do and interpret qualitative interviews and life-histories will be an important part of the course. The class meets every week throughout the term. (HHD)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Interdiv. 351. Special Topics.

Section 002 Theater Project Tuesday/Thursday meet times devoted to rehearsal & scene preparation. Students interested in doing research for the project should consider independent study. Prerequisite: One Russian Readings Course or Russian 301 or Permission of Instructor

Instructor(s): Alina Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Alina Makin for details.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Interdiv. 351. Special Topics.

Section 003 German Theatre Workshop

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Janet Hegman Shier for details.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Interdiv. 351. Special Topics.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): K Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Interdiv. 370. Western and Non-Western Medicine.

Instructor(s): Max Heirich (mheirich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a cross-cultural offering in the sociology of knowledge, using basic concepts involved in the health and medical practices of classical China, India, and the contemporary West. It will compare how three major cultural traditions have understood the relation of health to physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual processes, the kinds of interventions that are appropriate, and the social arrangements that are needed for health care. Students will be introduced to areas in which the traditions are beginning to come together, and to the implications these could have for health care. (HHD)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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