Winter '99 Course Guide

Courses in RC Social Science (Division 877)

Winter Term, 1999 (January 6-April 29, 1999)

Take me to the Winter Term '99 Time Schedule for RC Social Science.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements.

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE WAIT LIST PROCEDURES

Residential College students are given priority in all Residential College courses during the Early Registration and registration periods, and from waitlists. RC courses which satisfy specific Residential College graduation requirement are reserved for RC students only (e.g., RC language courses).

Waitlists of Residential College courses are maintained in the Residential College Counseling Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad. When a course fills, students should contact the RC Counseling Office (647-4359) to be placed on a waitlist if one is being maintained. RC sections of LS&A coursesThese sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.

Note to Senior concentrators in the Social Science Program: Under the requirements for the Social Science concentration, all seniors must write a graduating essay for which they will receive two credits. They MUST, therefore, register for two credits under RC Core 410 Senior Project during Winter Term. Students will then receive regular guidance and feedback from the faculty. To register, you will need an override from Charlie Bright and a letter of permission from the RC Counseling Office.

After each Social Science course description given below there is indicated (in parentheses) the role played by the course in the RC Social Science Concentration. This role can be Gateway, Theory, Research, Quantitative; or it can be related to one or more of the "areas of focus" in the concentration: global issues (G), social and community issues (SC), environmental issues (E), and health and human development issues (HHD). Non-concentrators are of course welcome to take any of these courses.


RC Soc. Sci. 202. The Twentieth Century: A Global View.

Instructor(s): Charlie Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course, designed for sophomores, is to help students locate themselves in the world they inhabit. We will attempt to "map" the world of the late 20th century, developing an analytically precise and historically grounded description of the contemporary world so that it can be seen as the product both of continuous historical processes and of specific historically unique conjunctures. This will involve an investigation on three tiers: we will study the process of global integration, the circuits of finance and exchange, of information-flow and migration, that selectively bind the world together; we will examine how the global flow of material goods and ideas percolate into and get appropriated to local contexts and needs, producing contests over meaning, identity and everyday practice; and we will explore how the interactions of global and local worlds produce crisis and realignment in the "middle ground" of states, national policies, and national identities. The central problem is to understand how processes of global integration create disjunctures and fields of contestation that, in turn, make the proliferation of difference a key characteristic of an integrating world. There are no prerequisites for the class; students will be asked to read five books and a number of articles and to write two papers. (Gateway)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 290. Social Science Basic Seminar.

Instructor(s): Charles Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Basic Seminar is required of all students as they begin an RC Social Science concentration. Its purpose is to assist each student in developing a concentration plan. The format consists of individual meetings with a faculty mentor from the Social Science Program and with others in the RC and LS&A who may be of help in planning a concentration, as well as a few seminar meetings with other students who are working on their concentration plans. The main task is to write a concentration prospectus that lays out the problems to be studied, the intellectual rationale for the plan, and a list of courses that may prove relevant. Students should take the Basic Seminar in conjunction with the 200-level Social Science courses that are prerequisite for the concentration. The instructors of these courses can give you further guidance. (Gateway)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 295. Quantitative Approaches to Social Science Questions.

Instructor(s): Volker Krause (vkrause@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school algebra. (4). (MSA). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students in this course learn to formulate questions from a social science perspective, and then to seek answers to those questions using a variety of quantitative methods. This is very much a hands-on course: students don't just learn statistical formulas, they use them with real-world data to explore the relationships among many relevant and interesting concepts. Each student, working closely with the instructor, designs and completes an empirical research project exploring a topic of their own selection. Learning the language of statistics and empirical social science, and becoming adept at the logic of quantitative reasoning are major objectives of this course.

This course has two simultaneous components. On the one hand, students become competent in the use of several basic statistical methods through traditional means: lectures, textbook, computer manual, homework problems, and extensive in-class exercises. At the same time, as their skills and understanding develop, they select a general topic area, formulate a question, translate it into a data collection instrument (survey or use of previously published data) and prepare these data for computer analysis.

The final two weeks of the course take on a workshop format, with students analyzing their data and preparing it for presentation as an academic poster. Students often find that this opportunity to use statistical techniques in their own work draws together all the material in the course, giving them a new level of understanding and mastery. The major emphasis on the practice of social science research is the feature which distinguishes this course from other statistics courses on campus.

Students have weekly homework assignments requiring the use of a calculator and the use of SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The instructor provides extensive feedback and individualized teaching with the homework problems.

Students' evaluations are based on participation in the classroom exercises, homework, a mastery-exam, and their final project. Students whose homework is up-to-date have the option to re-take the exam to demonstrate adequate mastery of the course material. (Quantitative)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 315. International Grassroots Development.

Instructor(s): Helen Fox (hfox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hfox/igrd.html

What does "development" really mean in the Third World? Do people need Western education? Business know-how? Provision of basic services? Gender equality? A national consciousness? Something to believe in? Liberation? To just be left alone? In this course we will look at how different definitions of "the problem" drive different solutions proposed by governments, aid agencies, religious groups and grassroots organizations. Besides posing some heavy questions, this course will give you an idea of what it's really like to work in the field of international "development," either at home or abroad. Be prepared for lively discussion, a deep, personal examination of your own beliefs and values, lots of writing and lots of help with your writing. Some previous courses in economics, political science, third world area studies and/or lived experience will be very helpful, though not required. The instructor is a writer for Peace Corps and has been involved in international development in Asia, Africa, and the South Pacific and in training programs for foreign nationals in the U.S.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 344. The History of Detroit in the 20th Century.

Instructor(s): Charles Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS).

R&E Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore the history of Detroit and the southeast Michigan region during the 20th Century. It will treat the city as an industrial boom town, carried along by the rise and fall of the automobile industry in this area. We will be concerned, therefore, with the development of Fordist production and its impact upon the geography of neighborhoods, social structures, political power, and cultural practices. The focus will be on the interplay of industry and city, of city and suburban communities, of ethnic or racial cleavages and class conflict in shaping the urban landscape. During the first part of the term, we will follow familiar terrains in the evolution and concentration of the auto industry and in the development of organized labor, but we will also explore the geography of ethnic neighborhoods and enclaves in the 1920s and 1930s as well as the contradictory impact of labor struggles upon city politics during the 1930s and 1940s. The middle and latter part of the term will focus on the postwar period: the boom of the 1950s/60s and the sources of the economic crisis of the 1970s; the postwar consolidation of organized labor and the crisis of labor control during the 1970s; the patterns of racial conflict from the world war to the riots of 1967 and the ways these shaped white flight and the consolidation of Black political power in the city; the urban investment in suburban development before 1967 and the strategies of urban renewal and downtown revitalization devised by the Young administration during the 1970s/80s; and contemporary political struggles over urban planning, regional development, and community defense. The aim in exploring these themes is to understand the nature of the city's decline and the new regional political economy and urban culture that has been taking shape in recent years. SC

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 345. Community Strategies Against Poverty in the United States.

Instructor(s): Tom Weisskopf (tomw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS).

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Developed as a collaboration of the Residential College and the Center for Learning through Community Service, this course analyzes the changing context of poverty and anti-poverty strategy in the U.S., with an emphasis on community-level initiatives to improve standards of living. The first half of the course focuses on the nature and sources of urban poverty in the contemporary U.S. and on the evolution of efforts to combat poverty since World War II. The second half of the course addresses a variety of community-based initiatives in recent decades to overcome urban poverty. Throughout the course attention will be devoted to the complex inter-relationships between race, class, and gender in urban America, as they affect poverty and efforts to overcome it with examples drawn frequently from the experience of the Detroit metropolitan area.

The course will meet twice a week. The first weekly session (Tuesday 4-6 PM) will be devoted to a lecture presentation in many cases by guest lecturers with special expertise in the subject to be addressed. Guest lecturers will include faculty from various UM units, such as the College of LS&A, the School of Social Work and the School of Public Health, as well as outside experts on community-based approaches to social and economic change. For the second weekly session (Thursday 4-6 PM) the class will usually meet in discussion groups of 15-20 students each; but often a film will be shown to the full class in the first hour.

Students are expected to submit a series of short papers reacting to course readings, to play an active role in classroom discussion, and to participate in a computer-based course discussion conference. Students will also take a few short in-class quizzes, and they will write one research paper. A previous course in the social sciences is highly desirable.

N.B.: There will be opportunities in spring/summer 1999 for a small number of students who have taken this course to work in teams with experienced practitioners in a community-based organization or civic agency. Students will be carefully selected for such an opportunity on the basis of their potential for applying their knowledge and getting things done in the community; and stipends may be available for such students. SC

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 001 Excellence, Equity, and the Politics of Education

Instructor(s): David Burkam (dtburkam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the broad issue of educational equity, explored within the context of the many goals of American schooling. In particular, readings and discussions will assess: (1) the social distribution of educational resources, opportunities and outcomes; (2) the role of schooling in reproducing and reinforcing prevailing economic, political, and social relationships; and (3) the potential contradictions between the societal functions of schooling and the professed goals of educators. Class time will follow a seminar format with student requirements including (a) extensive readings and active participation/leadership in class discussions, (b) three or four short essays, and (c) a final research project with in-class presentation.

Readings will be drawn from such texts as:

(SC)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 003 Political Economy of the Global Environment

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Does the term "environment sustainability" have any clear meaning? Is it a useful concept in efforts to define what the goals of environmental policy or development policy more generally ought to be? What are the institutions, principles, and rules governing the global market economy? How do they affect the dynamics of the interface between human populations and their natural environment? In particular, what do they imply for levels of poverty and economic inequality, both within and among nations? And what (if any) connection exists between poverty, inequality, and environmental sustainability? How do various important collective actors the international financial institutions (World Bank, IMF), the most powerful nations (e.g., USA, EU), transnational corporations, unions, and environmental movements understand this interface and what (if any) changes in existing institutions and policies do they prescribe? Who (if any) is right, and whose vision of the appropriate model for the global political economy and its relation to the environment is likely to prevail? (E, G)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 004 The Theory and Practice of Civil Society

Instructor(s): Frank Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Developed by the RC Social Science Program with support from the UM Center for Learning through Community Service, this course analyses the notion of civil society with a focus on how problems arise and are (or are not) solved by citizens' voluntary collaborations in civic engagement and advocacy. Special attention will be devoted to the often neglected diversity of civil society along dimensions of race, ethnicity, gender, age, and class. Groups examined will include Teamsters for a Democratic Union (TDU) and Michigan Universal Health Care Access Network (MichUCAN).

The course includes an integrated survey of conceptions of civil society in the history of social thought and especially in recent social scientific studies, e.g., by Robert Putnam, James Coleman, Sidney Tarrow, Joshua Cohen, and Joel Rogers. No less importantly the course takes up especially salient case studies of some current components of American civil society, employing diverse examples from group and issue advocacy groups, labor organizations, and political associations. Thus more abstract levels of analysis are related to current examples of civil societal activity, thereby testing elaborated theories against evidence arising in contemporary social practice. These case studies offer as well examples of civic engagement for students who may continue into internships and field studies opportunities following on the course.

The course will meet three times a week. Monday and Wednesday sessions (12-1 pm) will usually be devoted to lecture presentations, often by guests with special expertise in particular topics. On Fridays the class will divide into small discussion sections (11-12 am, 12-1 pm) to facilitate productive interaction among all course participants. Some class sessions (and optional other times) will be devoted to video materials illustrating themes of the course.

Students will be expected to submit a series of short papers responding to course readings and presentations and to participate in discussions in class and via a course email group. There will be a few in-class quizzes and a term paper on a mutually agreeable topic will be required. Although the course has no formal prerequisites, previous social science course work will be quite helpful.

N.B.: In close conjunction with the course a limited number of opportunities will be made available for student participation in selected organizations actively engaged in advocacy in civil society. These opportunities, largely but not exclusively in the Detroit area, will include volunteer activities during "spring break" as well as internships following on the course. Students will be selected for these opportunities on the basis of course performance and the needs of participating organizations. Some stipends for internships will be available. (SC)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 460. Social Science Senior Seminar.

Section 001 U.S. Imperialism Across the Pacific. Meets with American Culture 496.005

Instructor(s): Gail Nomura (gmnomura@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From the mid-nineteenth century the United States began to expand its western borders across the Pacific eventually acquiring by 1900 Midway, American Samoa, Hawaii, Guam, Wake, and the Philippines and, after World War II, Micronesia. With the acquisition of these overseas possessions "American imperialism" became the subject of intense debate. This debate has not abated. For example, U.S. intervention in Vietnam rekindled analogies to U.S. involvement in the Philippines and expanded the debate on American imperialism. This seminar will study the expansion of the United States across the Pacific and its consequences for people "acquired." In particular, the U.S. acquisition of the Philippines and attempts at "benevolent assimilation" of the Filipinos in the face of Filipino resistance will be examined as well as the annexation of Hawaii and Native Hawaiian resistance to U.S. colonization. Students may also examine the Vietnam parallel. This seminar offers students the opportunity to do original research on the history of American imperialism across the Pacific through the utilization of the resources at the Bentley Historical Library, Clements Library, Ford Library, and special collections at Hatcher Library. (G)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 460. Social Science Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Research Projects in Detroit

Instructor(s): Charlie Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This research seminar is designed to provide social science concentrators with ways of doing the required senior project and other students an opportunity to pursue primary research work on topics to do with the city of Detroit. The bulk of the work for this course will be done in the spring half-term and all students enrolling should make a commitment to remain in the area during May and early June.

We ask that you sign up for the course in the Winter Term, in order to reduce tuition costs and to allow us to begin planning projects and shaping up research groups during the winter, so the best use can be made of limited time in the spring. We strongly urge students interested in doing this seminar to also enroll in either (or both) junior seminars dealing with the region and its issues: SSci 344 The History of Detroit (Bright) or/and SSci 345 Community Strategies against Poverty (Weisskopf), also during Winter Term. These courses will provide background and develop perspectives for doing primary research.

The work that students will do over the winter and during the spring term can be either individual research projects or collective efforts among several students (or the entire class) working on shared or related interests. Decisions as to the kinds of projects and the topics to be researched will emerge from discussions during Winter Term among those who have expressed an interest and made a commitment to be here during the Spring Term. Questions about this seminar, and how it might be made to work for individual interests, should be addressed to the instructor, Charles Bright (765-7414/cbright@umich.edu). (SC)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 460. Social Science Senior Seminar.

Section 003 Organizational Theory and Change. Prerequisite: Jr/Sr Standing. Meets with SNRE 449

Instructor(s): Steven Brechin (sbrechin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course focuses in depth on the extensive nature of formal, complex organizations related generally to our environmental predicament. It offers a broad-based look at organizational theories and the processes of change within and among organizations. For the most part, we will utilize a sociological approach, but we make use of other perspectives drawing on theories and concepts from psychology, political science, management science, and other disciplines from time to time. The course makes use of organizational theory, concepts, and illustrations to encourage a greater understanding of how various formalized structures implement environmental policy, organize environmental risk, and manage our natural resources. In sum, organizations are the implementors of environmental policy, and the carriers of environmental and natural resources management programs. If we are to more fully understand and act in behalf our societies efforts to effectively manage ourselves and protect our environment, we must have a sophisticated view of the conceptual and actual strengths and weaknesses found among our organizations; their interactions with other organizations and the larger social environment; how they change or adapt or not; and how they can best be shaped or utilized for those purposes. One of our principal goals will be to develop skills in organizational analysis. (E)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Soc. Sci. 461. Senior Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): K. Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 11:34 AM on Fri, Feb 5, 1999.