Winter '99 Course Guide

First-Year Seminars for Winter Term 1999

The First-Year Seminar Program offers entering LS&A students a small group learning experience. Students participate in groups of approximately 18-25 and explore subjects of particular interest in collaboration with a faculty member who has chosen to work with first-year students in a seminar setting. It is hoped that students who take a seminar will find in it a sense of intellectual and social community that will make the transition from high school to a large university easier.

First-Year Seminars are taught through the University Courses division of the College (Division 495) or individual departments and programs. Course descriptions can be found later in this Course Guide. First-Year Seminars are 3- or 4-credit courses which may be used toward fulfillment of the Area Distribution requirement in Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Mathematical and Symbolic Analysis; the Quantitative Reasoning requirement; or the Introductory Composition requirement.

The following First-Year Seminars will be offered by departments and programs in the Fall Term, 1998. Course descriptions appear in the departmental listings of this Course Guide.

Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All other students need permission of instructor.

This list is subject to change.


Amer. Cult. 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Alternate Americas Science Fiction As History.

Instructor(s): June Howard

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

History is not only about the past, and science fiction is not only about the future. Both forms offer narratives about what has been, what might have been, and what might be. This course will explore many different visions of America, mostly through reading science-fictional "alternative history." We will also cross generic and national boundaries to read complementary works, including mainstream fiction, historical essays, and essays about the idea of the nation, history writing, and story-telling. Possible texts: Ray Bradbury, A Sound of Thunder; Kim Stanley Robinson, The Lucky Strike; Philip K. Dick, The Man in the High Castle; Octavia Butler, Kindred; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Geoff Ryman, Was; Orson Scott Card, Pastwatch. Format: discussion. Assignments: several short writing assignments, collaborative presentations, self-designed term projects. This class is part of the first-year seminar series and will encourage participation, critical thinking, and independent research.

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Asian St. 150. First Year Seminar in Asian Studies: Civilizations of Asia.

Section 001 Public and Private Lives: Traditional Chinese Writers and Their World. Meets with Chinese 150.

Instructor(s): Anna Shields (ashields@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Asian Languages required. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated with permission of instructor.

First-Year Seminar, Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

This course explores familiar questions: How does your work affect your personal life? Does public failure mean personal failure too? Can you or should you separate these two parts of your life? Although these questions may seem modern and American, they lay at the heart of the Chinese scholar-official's search for self-definition. In this course, we will explore the writing and lives of five important traditional Chinese writers, and we will see how differently they balanced the demands of their public and private lives. In Chinese culture, the two options were essentially "engagement" or "reclusion." We will spend the first weeks defining these options as they are laid out in Confucian and Taoist texts such as the Analects, the Mencius, the Chuang-tzu, and the Lao-tzu. Then we will turn to the five writers, whose lives span 2,000 years of Chinese history: Ssu-ma Ch'ien (Han dynasty), T'ao Ch'ien (Eastern Chin dynasty), Tu Fu (T'ang dynasty), Su Shih (Sung dynasty), and Yuan Mei (Ch'ing dynasty). We will discover that each writer managed to establish his own position (or positions) somewhere between the two poles of engagement and reclusion. Readings will include poetry and prose from each writer as well as historical and biographical material. The format of the course is lecture and discussion. There will be two short papers, one longer paper, and a final.

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Asian St. 150. First Year Seminar in Asian Studies: Civilizations of Asia.

Section 002 Other Hearts and Other Minds: Poetries of Asia.

Instructor(s): Peter Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Asian Languages required. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated with permission of instructor.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

This course will introduce first-year students to traditions of poetic theory and practice in times and places distant from their own: the poetries of India, Persia, China, Korea, Japan, and Indonesia. The primary objective of the course is to explore a range of different conceptions of what poetry is, of how it should form (or transform) the ways in which people interpret their lives, and of what relation it should have to other parts of social life. As this is a seminar, an equally important objective is to assist students in developing techniques and habits of reading and research. At least once during the course each student will give the class a half hour biographical/historical introduction to a poet or set of poets. The instructor and visiting faculty lead discussion of poetry and poets in more abstract terms. Shorter written assignments build on the interplay of a specific poet or poem and general questions explored by the course. (Translation or transcreation will be an option for some of these assignments.) There will be one hour exam and one longer paper. On completing this cross-cultural exploration the student should also have a more informed and more articulate conception of the poetry he or she has grown up with.

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Asian St. 150. First Year Seminar in Asian Studies: Civilizations of Asia.

Section 003 Languages of Asia.

Instructor(s): William Baxter

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Asian Languages required. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated with permission of instructor.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

Through hands-on exercises and investigations, students in this course will explore aspects of language and its place in Asian societies. Topics will include the relationships of Asian languages to each other, linguistic clues to early history and prehistory, Asian scripts and their development, Asian languages in the computer age, and the interaction of language and culture. Emphasis will be on direct investigation of actual examples from a wide variety of Asian languages, including minority languages.

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Asian St. 251/Chinese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture.

Section 001 Culture in Times of Crisis: Literature from China's "Middle Ages," 220-589.

Instructor(s): Anna Shields (ashields@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

This course will introduce you to literature from the four centuries that separated the Han and Tang dynasties. During this period, many kingdoms rose and fell, new styles of writing flourished throughout China; it was one of the most exciting eras of Chinese history. From the dangerous politics of the Three Kingdoms through the "decadent" salons of the Southern Dynasties, we will read a variety of literary texts, including poetry, essays, witty conversations, "tales of the strange". and religious scriptures. In our reading, we will explore the ways in which writers responded to the challenges of their times, whether through satire, criticism, reclusion, drunkenness, or a search for nirvana or transcendence. The format is lecture and discussion. The texts will include The Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature, a course pack, and reserve readings. There will be three short papers and a final exam.

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Asian St. 253/S&SEA 250. Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture.

Section 001 Religion in Modern India.

Instructor(s): Pashaura Singh (psingh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of any Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

This course is about the diversity of religious life in modern India. It will begin with the examination of the following three points, namely, (1) that ancient layers of India's religious life are alive and well in contemporary India; (2) that the hybrid discourse of the "secular state" is itself a religious discourse in modern India; and (3) that India's unique agony over religion is instructive for rethinking some of our most general notions about "religion" and "secularization." In this course we will discuss the overall periodization of the various layers of India's religious life, namely, (1) the Indus Valley (c. 3000 1500 BCE), (2) the Indo-Brahmanical (c. 1500 600 BCE), (3) the Indo-Sramanical (c. 600 BCE 300 CE), (4) the Indic (Hindu-Buddhist-Jain) (c. 300 1200), (5) the Indo-Islamic (c. 1200 1757), and (6) the Indo-Anglian (c. 1757 present). We will then apply the overall analysis to the five salient religious crises in contemporary India: the Sikhs in the Punjab, the Muslim issue in Kashmir, the Shah Banno case and the Muslim Women's bill, the Mandal Commission Report on Other Backward Classes, and the controversy in Ayodhya. We will also examine the role of ethnic and racial conflicts that led to these crises. Course requirements include: presentation and participation in tutorial discussions, an essay of 3,000 words, a midterm and a final exam.

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Asian St. 253/S&SEA 250. Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture.

Section 002 Bhagavad-Gita: The Activist View of Hinduism.

Instructor(s): Madhav Deshpande (mmdesh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of any Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

This course introduces Hinduism to students through an intensive study of this single most important scriptural text, the Bhagavad-Gita. We spend half the time going over the text-in-translation, chapter by chapter. The other half of the class time is devoted to critical issues relating to the text, i.e., history of the text, its transmission, its location within the history of Hinduism, its connections with political/cultural history, its ancient and modern interpretations. The grade is based on class participation, two papers, and two in-class examinations.

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Chinese 250/Asian Studies 251. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001 Culture in Times of Crisis: Literature from China's "Middle Ages," 220-589 .

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

See Asian Studies 251.001.

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S&SEA 250/Asian Studies 253. Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture.

Culture Courses

Section 001 Religion in Modern India.

Instructor(s): Pashaura Singh (psingh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of any Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

See Asian Studies 253.001.

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S&SEA 250/Asian Studies 253. Undergraduate Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Culture.

Culture Courses

Section 002 Bhagavad-Gita: The Activist View of Hinduism.

Instructor(s): Madhav Deshpande (mmdesh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of any Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

See Asian Studies 253.002.

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Astro. 125. Observational Astronomy.

Instructor(s): Patrick Seitzer (seitzer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Astro. 120. (4). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Cost: 2
Waitlist Code 4

Course Homepage:

This course will teach how astronomical discoveries are made, from what naked eye observations tell us about the solar system and the universe (example: why is the night sky dark?) through what modern telescopes on the ground and in space tell us. We will use all available optical telescopes on campus to explore the different types of telescopes and how they are used to explore the universe. Through this, students will learn how modern astronomical research is conducted. The course will involve lectures, assigned readings, written assignments, and one evening laboratory session per week.

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Biol. 120. First Year Seminar in Biology.

Instructor(s): John Lehman (jtlehman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

The purpose of the first-year seminar is to permit a small group of undergraduates to meet regularly with a full professor during their first year. This is a discussion format, not a lecture, and students are expected to participate by asking questions and sharing opinions. Reading assignments outside of class time will come from library sources and will require the use of electronic search tools that you will learn about. The main point is to gain an understanding of the types of scientific knowledge that are needed to solve environmental problems, and to develop an appreciation of problem-solving skills. Included at no extra cost will be some practical philosophy about science and about undergraduate education at large research universities. No assigned textbook.

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Biol. 120. First Year Seminar in Biology.

Section 002 Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases.

Instructor(s): Reinarz

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

During the age of discovery of antibiotics, medical scientists often expressed confidence in winning the "War on Disease." Microbes have prevailed, however, and recent news is filled with accounts of recurring and previously unknown threats. This seminar will examine clinical victories and failures to contain infectious diseases. Models will include polio, influenza, HIV infections, multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, and Ebola. This course is limited to 20 first-year students. The class will be primarily discussion format and will include oral presentations by students. The grade will be based on class discussion, group presentation, and written assignments.

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Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 Gender and Popular Culture. Meets with Women's Studies 150.002.

Instructor(s): Sally Robinson (sallyr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

Romance fiction, that most "feminine" of genres, is often derided as the lowest of low culture: trashy, trivial, even dangerous. In this seminar, we'll approach this broad topic by exploring the gender of, as well as the gender in, romance. What kinds of femininity and masculinity do romances construct as ideal? As monstrous? We'll look at "straight" examples of romance (perhaps Austen's Pride and Prejudice, a mass-market Harlequin, The Bridges of Madison County, Disney's Beauty and the Beast); and parodies or revisions of the genre (Bridget Jones's Diary, Faye Weldon's The Life and Loves of a She-Devil, Margaret Atwood's Lady Oracle, the film True Lies, perhaps); some critical essays on romance. Seminar members will be responsible for presenting work to the class, and will do research via the Internet, popular magazines, self-help books, television, or film, to broaden the class's investigation. Vigorous participation, two short papers, one longer paper.

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Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 003 Of Human Bonding: The Art of Friendship.

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

The course is intended as an introduction to the University as a community of discussion. The course is a seminar, a structure which asks active participation both orally and in writing. Our discussion will focus this term on "Arts" of friendship, those works which define and explore personal bondings formed by choice. These works will raise issues of social class, of economic rank, of age, gender, and taste as either helps or impediments to friendship. Authors or artists whose works will form the basis of discussion will include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Michelangelo, Montaigne, Bacon, Whitman, Douglas, Woolf, and Toni Morrison. Writing: informal writing each week; more formal writing every other week throughout the term. Each student will make a seminar presentation; there will be a seminar-style final examination.

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Geol. Sci. 147(271). Natural Hazards.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators
Section 001.

Instructor(s): Larry Ruff

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students (including first-year students with sophomore standing) may pre-register for this course. All other students need permission of instructor. Those with credit for GS 107 or 205 may only elect GS 147 for 2 credits. Those who have credit for both GS 107 and 205 may only elect 147 for 1 credit. (3). (NS). (BS).

No Description Provided.

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History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Cuba and the United States: Ties of Singular Intimacy.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Scott

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

How and why has an island in the Caribbean mattered so much to the government and people of the United States; and how and why has a northern neighbor mattered so much to the island of Cuba? This seminar will examine the intertwined histories of the United States and Cuba, focusing on questions as urgent as race and social movements, and topics as important to both cultures as music and baseball. We will draw on some primary documents in translation, and secondary works by Louis A. Perez, Jr., Alejandro de la Fuente, Thomas Paterson, and others.

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History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 The British Empire.

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswamy

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

This first-year seminar focuses on the establishment of British colonial rule in the Americas, Asia, and Africa from the 16th through the 20th centuries. We will consider the political, economic, and cultural forces at work during this period. Themes of the seminar include: race, gender, and sexuality; travel and exploration; ideologies of colonial rule; the economics of empire; and resistance to imperialism and criticisms of empire that emerged in both Britain and its colonies by the 20th century. We will explore such themes through novels and nationalist memoirs; women's writings; travel literature; and films.

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Hist. Art 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 Rome: From the Babylonian Captivity to the Age of Galileo.

Instructor(s): Stephen Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Cost: 2
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

Following the collapse of the Roman Empire, the subsequent fortunes of its capital city despite recurrent political and social upheaval were interpreted in terms of prophetic myth and a sense of historical destiny. This course picks up the story of Rome during the crisis-ridden period of its temporary abandonment by the Papacy during the fourteenth century, and will investigate subsequent "moments" of its transformation into a cosmopolitan Renaissance and Baroque city with multiple, overlapping identities: the spiritual destination of pilgrims and tourists, the seat of a priest/monarch claiming universal dominion, the ruinous symbol of past and present decadence and its castigation, and, above all, the "theater of the world" where a cultural and ethnic heterogeneity unparalleled in any other European urban center was permanently on display. We will primarily be focusing on one hand on monumental works of art and schemes of urbanization which propagate the myth of Rome's eternity and portentous destiny, and on the other on the lived experience of urban life primarily as it was witnessed and described by visitors and outsiders. Classes will be organized around particular historical episodes, individual experiences, or monumental works, e.g.,: cult images and processions, the Sistine Chapel, the visit of Marten van Heemskerck, the Sack of 1527, the rebuilding of St. Peter's, Caravaggio and his patrons, the trial of Galileo.

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Hist. Art 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 002 Signs and Symbols in the Lands of the Bible.

Instructor(s): Beth Dusinberre

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

Why do people use signs and symbols? How does a symbol take on particular meaning? Why can certain works or objects evoke a range of ideas in our minds? Is the use of symbolic representation particularly important in such areas as religion and magic? Where else do we see it? What is the potential for the same symbols to be used for different specific messages in different contexts? This seminar will explore signs and symbols in the lands of the Bible, the ancient Near East and Egypt, from prehistoric into Christian times. We will concentrate on artistic symbols, working with objects in the Kelsey Museum as well as with illustrations in books.

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Honors 150/Chinese 150. Chinese Civilization.

Section 001 Public and Private Lives: Traditional Chinese Writers and Their World. Meets with Asian Studies 150.

Instructor(s): Anna Shields (ashields@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (Excl).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

See Asian Studies 150.001.

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Inst. Hum. 101. First Year Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies.

Section 001 Who Says You Can't Draw?.

Instructor(s): Sadashi Inuzuka

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

This first-year seminar will re-examine students' perception of art, how they see themselves as both artist and viewer. We will share experiences of how art is taught in the school system with the purpose of developing a positive individual approach to making art. The focus of this course is to encourage students to become comfortable and inspired to use art as a means of expression and inquiry. This course will be a combination seminar discussion and hands-on practice. Our goal is to cultivate a flexible and creative mind, which can be applied in any field, and to broaden students' perception of art.

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Ling. 102. First Year Seminar (Humanities).

Section 001 Languages & Peoples of Eastern Europe, Russia, and Caucasus.

Instructor(s): Vitalij Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

This course is a brief acquaintance with 150 languages and peoples of Eastern Europe, Russia, and Caucasus "a mountain of languages". Topics will include: Spread of the Russian language in Siberia. Caucasus, and Central Asia. as compared with the expansion of English in America; Russification policy in the former Soviet Union; Languages of Eastern Europe and Russia under dictatorship; Language as a weapon: forbidden books, songs, and anecdotes as a tool which ultimately brought down the Communist system in Eastern Europe and Russia; Cultural differences between peoples speaking different languages; National character as seen through the language: differences in the meaning of the words FREEDOM, FRIENDSHIP, EMOTION in Russian and in English; Russian and East European languages today: a massive borrowing from American English; Recent achievements in language study in Russia and Eastern Europe.

Specialists in the area as well as singers of native songs will be invited. Several videofilms will be shown.

Students will be evaluated by their discussion in class, as well as by their written homework.

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Math. 127. Geometry and the Imagination.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school mathematics including a geometry course. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed a 200- (or higher) level mathematics course. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (4).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 2

Course Homepage:

This course introduces students to the ideas and some of the basic results in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. Beginning with geometry in ancient Greece, the course includes the construction of new geometric objects from old ones by projecting and by taking slices. The next topic is non-Euclidean geometry. This section begins with the independence of Euclid's Fifth Postulate and with the construction of spherical and hyperbolic geometries in which the Fifth Postulate fails; how spherical and hyperbolic geometry differs from Euclidean geometry. The last topic is geometry of higher dimensions: coordinatization the mathematician's tool for studying higher dimensions; construction of higher-dimensional analogues of some familiar objects like spheres and cubes; discussion of the proper higher-dimensional analogues of some geometric notions (length, angle, orthogonality, etc. This course is intended for students who want an introduction to mathematical ideas and culture. Emphasis on conceptual thinking students will do hands-on experimentation with geometric shapes, patterns, and ideas. Grades based on homework and a final project. No exams. Text: Beyond the Third Dimension (Thomas Banchoff, 1990).

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Philo. 196. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 Free Will.

Instructor(s): Arpaly

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 4

Course Homepage:

In this course, we shall explore the philosophical problem of free will, determinism, and moral responsibility. Could we have moral responsibility if our actions are causally determined by environment and heredity, and hence by circumstances ultimately beyond our control? If so, how? We will look at various philosophical answers to these questions. Emphasis will be on class discussion more than on lecture, and evaluation will be based on research papers rather than exams.

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Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Health & Healing Mind & Body.

Instructor(s): Anne Murphy (jamurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 2
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

This seminar will explore conceptions of health and healing within a broad range of traditions, from conventional allopathic medicine to shamanism. We will study the mind/body relation within these traditions as well as consider current scientific studies that may elucidate how the mind-body connection impacts on health. Given the variety of traditions we will examine, this seminar will encourage a broadening of our conception of health to include physical, mental as well as spiritual well-being. We will also examine our own personal beliefs and understanding of health. Classes will involve discussion of readings, personal theories, as well how we view medicine in modern day society. Grades will be based on short written commentaries on reading assignments, small self-designed projects, and papers. There will be some choice in determining the basis for the grade.

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Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 Psychology & Law.

Instructor(s): Robert Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 2
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

This seminar studies issues in which law and psychology interact. We will examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press (e.g., the Simpson, Bobbit, and Menendez trials), as well as some fictional accounts (e.g., Grisham's A Time to Kill and Dershowitz's The Advocate's Devil).

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Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Understanding Public Opinion: Polls and What They Tell Us.

Instructor(s): Norbert Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 2
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

This seminar provides an introduction to public opinion and public opinion polling: What is "public opinion"? What are some of the main currents of public opinion pertaining to issues like trust in government, abortion, and race relations? And most importantly: How do we know? How does one conduct an opinion poll? What distinguishes good polling practices from bad ones? The key goal is to enable students to use and critically evaluate the results of public opinion polls. The seminar includes exercises like writing a questionnaire, conducting an interview, and using data sources available on the web.

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Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 005 Psychology and Nonordinary Experience.

Instructor(s): Richard Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

This seminar will explore the experimental, anecdotal, and theoretical work that suggests that we humans are capable of intuition and knowledge that seriously challenge the prevailing conceptions of human potential and sensory-based reality. Experiences of non-ordinary reality are accepted as valid across a wide range of cultures and under varied conditions. However, it is only recently that such phenomena as remote viewing and holistic mind-body connections have begun to cross the boundary into the scientific community, stimulating both research and strenuous efforts to debunk what has been reported in the literature. We will review this literature and its critics. We will explore the possibility of replicating or extending some of these studies. And we will review efforts to make theoretical sense of what has been found to date.

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Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 006 Late Life Potential.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 2
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

This freshman seminar will focus on late life potential. Late life usually is considered a time of inevitable loss. However, there is growing evidence about ways to limit these losses, and also possible gains and in late life. Over the term we will examine theory and research on development and aging, as well as read biographical material on late life greatness, study examples of late life accomplishments, and talk with vital old people. By the end of the seminar students should understand the nature of late life potential, as well as some of the conditions that facilitate it. From this understanding we will also consider appropriate roles for the elders of our society. The seminar will mainly involve discussion. Students will be evaluated by short weekly papers and a final exam.

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Italian 150. First Year Seminar in Italian Studies.

Courses Taught in English Translation (without language prerequisites)

Section 001 Witchcraft in Renaissance Italy. Taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required.

Instructor(s): Meg Gallucci (gallucci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Cost: 2
Waitlist Code 4

Course Homepage:

In this interdisciplinary course we will examine the phenomenon of witchcraft in Italy in literature, theology, law, and art during the period 1450-1650. We will read plays, poetry, and short stories, as well as primary sources such as Inquisition manuals and actual trial transcripts. We will ask some general questions which have perplexed scholars of European witchcraft: What was the difference between witchcraft and magic? Why were women stereotypical witches? Did mass hysteria lead to a witch hunt? We will use English and American models (Salem) for comparative studies. We will conclude with images of witches in the popular imagination, especially in Hollywood films.

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Port. 150. First Year Seminar in Brazilian Studies.

Section 001 Breaking Gender and Racial Barriers in Brazil.

Instructor(s): Niedja Fedrigo (niedja@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

R&E First-Year Seminar, Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

This interdisciplinary seminar critically examines contemporary Brazilian women condition, their struggle to gain cultural, economic, and socio-political equality. Our focus will be on questions and perspectives concerning both the literary and socio-economic aspects of gender, racial, and class inequality, resistance, transformation, and options for self-empowerment. The format includes group discussions and activities, regularly assigned readings and papers. E-mail group discussions, in-class presentations, film screenings, and Internet/library research supplement class discussions.

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Soc. 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 001 Population and Health in Transitional Societies.

Instructor(s): Barbara Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

This seminar examines and discusses major changes and challenges in population processes and health in societies in a process of substantial social, political, and economic transition, with a focus on China, the countries of the former Soviet Union, and South Africa. A special focus is the situation of for the poor and for members of different ethnic groups.

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UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 001 Inventing Race.

Instructor(s): Vanessa Agnew (vagnew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar, Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

This seminar deals with the emerging concept of race in late 18th- and early 19th-century Europe. Focusing on the work of key Enlightenment thinkers Linne, Buffon, Kant, and Montesquieu as well as the contribution made by travel writers and ethnographers, the seminar examines the way in which race was invented as a category. Study of the material highlights the tension between Enlightenment universalism and relativism and brings out the shifting criteria for the constitution of racial difference. The seminar goes on to examine the process whereby racial topologies were naturalized within the context of nascent anthropological, biological, and medical discourses and traces some of the social and political implications thereof. In confronting the issue of the social and historical constructedness of race, the seminar concludes with a brief examination of contemporary "race" thinking. Students will read texts by Appiah, Goldberg, Hooks, Fanon, and Wright and examine issues concerning the politicization of racial difference multiculturalism, identity politics, and xenophobia. The seminar emphasizes student participation. Students will be encouraged to discuss the material and to relate the readings to their own experiences. In addition to assigned readings, the seminar will include the use of visual media discussion of films, paintings, and museum exhibits. Assessment will take the form of oral presentations, class participation, written responses to assigned readings and a longer essay. The instructor will be available to consult with students about their work and about the seminar in general.

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UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 002 The Literature of Colonialism in Asia.

Instructor(s): Rhoads Murphey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

We will read novels and stories set in colonial or semi-colonial Asia, by both Western and Asian writers, that can give perspective from both sides. Readings will include Kipling's stories; A Passage to India by Forster; The Guide by R.K. Narayan; Burmese Days by Orwell; The Quiet American by Greene; Stories by Lu Hsun; The Good Earth by Pearl Buck; The Chinese Bell Murders by Robert Van Gulick; The Ginger Tree by Oswald Wynd; and When I Whistle by Shusako Endo. Some use will also be made of films, including those based on some of the books or stories we will read. Total reading is modest, but fun.

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UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 003 Fictional World of Ernest Hemingway.

Instructor(s): Edward Shafter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

"All stories, if continued long enough, end in death, and he is no true storyteller who would keep that from you." This stark observation by Ernest Hemingway pinpoints his basic pessimism regarding the human condition. For him, the harsh realities of that condition are violence, suffering, absurdity, disorder and, finally, death. Nevertheless, despite its tragic nature, life still can often be a delight love and friends are especially rewarding. You will enter this compelling Hemingway world through the reading of short stories plus such longer works as The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms. Since this course is discussion and not lecture, your active oral participation at each meeting is a non-negotiable expectation. There will be frequent short papers and a final examination.

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UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 001 Why Grandpa Went To War: The Psychology of Obedience & Drives Toward World War.

Instructor(s): Donald Brown (donrobro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

What were the social, economic, geopolitical and personal psychological conditions in 1942 that would result in an 18-year-old freshman leaving college and going off to spend the next three years fighting with the U.S. Army in Europe and liberating Dachau? What led up to 1942 and how did these series of historical events become a part of the life of American youth and continue to affect that generation's (your grandparents) behavior after World War II and through today? What do we know from 30 years of research on the nature of obedience that resulted in both self-sacrifice and the Holocaust? These questions will be explored using the resources of historical works, novels, films, and personal documents. Each student will interview a member of that generation, preferably a grandparent or surrogate, with armed services experience during the war and write a psycho-history of their subject's experiences and its consequences for their lives and times.

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UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 002 Public Education for Blacks and Other Minorities: An Historic Perspective.

Instructor(s): Warren Palmer (palmerwg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar, Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

The purpose of the seminar will be to trace the development of elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education of Blacks and other minorities in the South from the Emancipation Proclamation to May 17, 1954. Particular emphasis will be focused on watershed judicial litigation, from the Supreme Court decision of Plessy vs. Ferguson, from which the doctrine of "separate but equal" evolved, to the historic Brown vs. Topeka, Kansas Board of Education in 1954 and beyond. Of special importance will be seminar discussions revealing how Blacks and other minorities were successful in achieving an education in spite of the barriers confronting them. Students will be expected to read a number of the classic writings by authors such as W.E.B. DuBois, E. Franklin Frazier, Booker T. Washington, and John Hope Franklin. The writings of contemporary Blacks and minorities will be explored as well as books such as Gunnar Myrdal's An American Dilemma. Students will be expected to prepare readings, participate in seminar discussions, and develop a research topic preferably centered around one of the Southern states under investigation in the seminar.

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UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 006 Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships.

Instructor(s): Allen Menlo (almenlo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

This course is designed to assist members toward an understanding of the personal and situational forces that help and hinder persons in their relationships with each other and in their efforts to work and live together. It will also assist members to transform these social psychological understandings into constructive actions for handling the problems and difficulties that inevitably arise when people are together. There will be opportunity to refine one's competencies at reflective listening, giving and seeking feedback, interpersonal observation, and mindfulness in thinking about issues. The class sessions are interactive and informal with brief information-giving, focused discussions, interpersonal learning exercises, and videotapes. Reading assignments are mainly through course handouts and other suggested sources. To stimulate personal reflection on interpersonal issues, class members maintain an observation log and a reading log and do a term paper on a relevant, self-selected topic. This work is also used as the source of evaluation and grading in the course.

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UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 007 The Ethical Treatment of Cancer.

Instructor(s): Jill A. Macoska (jcoska@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

Medicine continues to advance in the treatment of cancer, but is far from being able to "cure" all cancers. This presents several ethical dilemmas that are encountered by physicians and other health professionals who treat patients with cancer. This course will evaluate potential ways to resolve these dilemmas by introducing students to some of the ethical issues involved in cancer detection, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and outcome, and in physician/patient interactions. The topics to be discussed include: (1) a basic introduction to ethical theory; (2) information and truth in the patient-physician relationship, i.e. disclosure of diagnosis versus prognosis and how much to tell; (3) the roles of realism and hope in the cancer equation; (4) the decision to "end" treatment, especially how much therapy is "enough" and what are the alternatives, e.g. hospice and euthanasia; (5) clinical trials, in particular the ethics of randomization and the use of patients as experimental subjects; (6) cancer screening, i.e. using genetic testing and other means to identify people at risk for developing cancer or with asymptomatic (non-clinical) cancers. This course will evaluate potential ways to resolve these dilemmas through lectures, oral presentations and written reports intended to engender thoughtful analysis and lively debates among the class participants.

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UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 008 Epidemics: Mass Disease in American History.

Instructor(s): Martin Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: 1
Waitlist Code No Data Given.

Course Homepage:

From smallpox to AIDS, dramatic disease outbreaks both shaped and were shaped by American culture. This course explores how medicine and culture intersected to influence the causes, experiences of, and responses to epidemics in America; and it uses epidemics to illuminate the history of American society from colonization to the present. Lectures introduce new topics and summarize discussions. Discussions explore past perceptions and compare past and present; we will not discuss the present apart from the past. Readings (4-5 hours weekly) include modern histories, plus old newspapers, films, and medical journals. Readings available only for purchase cost about $30; other required readings available on reserve or for purchase cost about $125 more. Written assignments are two 5-page book review papers, a short weekly journal, and an individual research project with parts due throughout the term. They will introduce you to the medical, graduate, and undergraduate libraries.

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Women's St. 150. Humanities Seminars on Women and Gender.

Section 002 Gender and Popular Culture. Meets with English 140.002.

Instructor(s): Sally Robinson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

See English 140.002.

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Women's St. 151. Social Science Seminars on Women and Gender.

Section 001 Women in War and Peace.

Instructor(s): Ann Larimore

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar, Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

To begin to understand women's long search for peace and the abolition of war, this seminar uses three perspectives. After a brief consideration of how women have fared in various wars, we will learn about the persistence of the international women's peace movement during the 20th century, about outstanding women peace activists such as Jane Addams, Eleanor Roosevelt, Rigoberta Menchú and other Nobel peace prize winners. Next, we will focus on the protracted Israeli-Palestinian dispute over national territory and the varying roles women have taken in that struggle. Third, we will investigate women's peace-making activities within peace movements of different scopes: national, regional, global. These efforts have all taken place in a gendered context so that we will necessarily be considering the actions of men as well. A primary goal is to clarify our own thoughts and develop a position about our individual relationships to increasing peace in the world and decreasing wars.

This course will focus on library research and writing. It will be taught using collaborative pedagogical methods. We will use STORY SPACE, a hypertext software writing tool for the Macintosh, to write analysis, exposition, and narration. Three papers drawn from hypertext writing and effective class participation are required.

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Women's St. 151. Social Science Seminars on Women and Gender.

Section 002 Introduction To Feminist Legal Theory.

Instructor(s): Tracy Edwards

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar, Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Cost: No Data Given.
Waitlist Code 1

Course Homepage:

Presupposing that American law is gendered, this course on Women and Gender focuses upon the first and fourteenth amendment (liberty and equality) and how they pertain to women. In particular, we will examine sexual harassment law, pornography, reproductive rights, and civil rights legislation including subtopics such as affirmative action and equal education opportunity. Materials include abridged cases and films. Course requirements for this seminar are class participation, several short homework assignments throughout the term, two papers, and a comprehensive take home final examination.

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