Winter '99 Course Guide

Minicourses for Winter Term 1999

A mini-course is a one-credit course not associated with any other course (i.e., a one-credit lab is not a minicourse) that either meets for part of the term, or one hour a week for the entire term.

Two-credit short courses occasionally are offered, meeting for only part of the term.

If the course meets for only part of the term, the meeting dates are indicated in the Section Title of the course.

Open and Available designates minicourses which are open and may be registered for by students who meet the prerequisites for that class.

Winter Term 1999 Course Guide homepage

Minicourses for Winter Term 1999 WITHOUT Descriptions


CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Performance & Politics in Africa: The Arts in the Making and Dismantling of Dictatorships. (1 credit). January 26 through February 23, 1999. Drop/Add deadline: February 8

Instructor(s): Nkanga

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will analyze the ways in which artists and performers have contributed to making opressive regimes and how, in other contexts, they contributed to undermining those regimes. Through their works, artists and performers developed signs and rhetorical images aimed at the powerholders whose image they promoted at first. This change of attitude can be seen in more or less hidden messages addressed to the people subject to the hardships imposed by dictatorial regimes such as that of Mobutu Sese Seko in former Zaire.

Through selected films, visual materials, and readings, the students and instructor will look at the ways performance and other art works evolved and contributed to the making and dismantling of dictatorships. Beyond pondering the semiological questions raised by such an approach, the students and instructor will examine the validity, the pertinence, and the impact of such forms of communication. Other forms of social communication will be considered during the course. In addition to viewing films and visual works, the class will read plays by Wole Soyinka and a variety of texts on civil society, resistance, literature, and other topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 002 The Development of Psychological Research in Africa. (1 credit). Meeets with Psychology 401.003. Meets March 8-April 14. Drop/Add deadline: March 12

Instructor(s): Denis Chima Ugwuegbu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Prof. Ugwuegbu is a Social Psychologist and visiting professor in Psychology & CAAS. The former head of the Department of Psychology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, he is engaged in research on several subjects including:

The primary objective of this course is to equip students with the necessary knowledge, skils, and techniques that will enable them to carry out psychological research on African topics and in Africa. The courses is aimed at upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in psychology, Afroamerican & African studies, and related social science disciplines.

The course begins with an examination of the status of psychology and of psychological and social research in Africa impediments to the development of psychological and social research in African settings; ethical standards and abuses of early research privileges by researchers in Africa. This is followed by a comparative analysis of African traditional approaches to gaining knowledge and Western psychological and social science approaches. The student will furthe learn how to plan psychological and social research in Africa, the use of scientific sampling techniques in African settings, how to recruit and train field workers or interviewers, and how to obtain data that are reliable, valid, and generalizable from a non-Western population such as in Africa.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 Asian Pacific Americans & the Law. (1 Credit). Mini Course Runs February 16 March 23. Drop/Add deadline: February 23

Instructor(s): Hwang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an overview of how federal and state laws have affected the Asian Pacific American (APA) experience and presence in the U.S. The course will cover the APA historical timeline, exclusion laws, alien land laws, World War II internment of Japanese Americans, affirmative action as it applies to APAs, civil rights and racial hate crime violence, bilingual issues in education and the workplace, and the drive for native Hawaiian recognition and separation, among other topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Asian St. 491. Topics in Japanese Studies.

Section 001 Japanese Cinema

Instructor(s): Mikiro Kato

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is being taught through the Center for Japanese Studies by Mikiro Kato, Associate Professor of the University of Kyoto. It will be an intensive study of the national cinema in a historical, sociocultural context with emphasis on deconstructive analysis. The course focuses on questions of style and meaning of particular Japanese filmmakers such as Hiroshi Shimizu, Heinosuke Gosho, Kenji Mizoguchi, Mikio Naruse, Yasujiro Ozu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Astro. 127. Naked Eye Astronomy.

Section 001, 003 Mini-Course Meets Jan 6 To Feb 24

Instructor(s): Julia Plummer (plummerj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.astro.lsa.umich.edu/Course/Plummer127/

The purpose of this course is to examine and understand the observational phenomena that everyone has observed and become familiar with. Students will learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, and the stars. Students will come to understand astronomical phenomena such as the motion of these objects on the sky and their implications: seasons, phases of the moon, solar and lunar eclipses, and the perplexing motions of the planets. Another important topic is the changing stellar sky, including the identification of the brighter stars and constellations during the different seasons. Transient objects such as comets and meteors will be discussed, and a meteorite shower will be observed. The course will conclude with a discussion of ancient observatories and the historical efforts by humanity to measure important astronomical phenomena. A planetarium will be one of the primary teaching facilities, but students will make their own observations and also work with computer programs, such as "The Sky." There will be homework assignments and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Astro. 127. Naked Eye Astronomy.

Section 002, 004 Mini-Course Meets Mar 8 To Apr 19. Drop/Add deadline: March 19

Instructor(s): Joel Bregman (jbregman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to examine and understand the observational phenomena that everyone has observed and become familiar with. Students will learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, and the stars. Students will come to understand astronomical phenomena such as the motion of these objects on the sky and their implications: seasons, phases of the moon, solar and lunar eclipses, and the perplexing motions of the planets. Another important topic is the changing stellar sky, including the identification of the brighter stars and constellations during the different seasons. Transient objects such as comets and meteors will be discussed, and a meteorite shower will be observed. The course will conclude with a discussion of ancient observatories and the historical efforts by humanity to measure important astronomical phenomena. A planetarium will be one of the primary teaching facilities, but students will make their own observations and also work with computer programs, such as "The Sky." There will be homework assignments and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Biol. Chem. 573. Enzyme Kinetics and Ligand Binding.

Section 001 January 6 February 8, 1999

Instructor(s): Martha Lugwig (ludwig@umich.edu), Bruce Palfey (brupalf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. Chem. 570 or equivalent. Physical chemistry is strongly recommended. (1). (Excl). (BS).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. Chem. 574. Catalysis.

Section 001 Meets February 10 March 19. Drop/Add deadline: February 16

Instructor(s): Michael Marletta (marle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. Chem. 570 and 573. Physical chemistry is strongly recommended. (1). (Excl). (BS).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Comp. Sci. 284/EECS 284. Introduction to a Programming Language or System.

Instructor(s): Ghassan Shahine (fadwa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Some programming knowledge is required. No credit granted for the C minicourse to those students who have completed CS 280. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/courses/eecs284

A mini course covering the fundamentals of a high level programming language or a system such as UNIX. Programming problems will be assigned. Specific languages or systems to be offered will be announced in advance. Credit will not be given for the C mini course to students who have taken EECS 280. I and II.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Comp. Sci. 285/EECS 285. A Programming Language or Computer System.

Section 001 Java

Instructor(s): Sandra Bartlett (bartlett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~bartlett/w99java.html

A course covering a complex computer system or programming language. Programming problems will be assigned. Specific languages or systems to be offered will be announced in advance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of this century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable. Coursework includes one 8 page essay and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Geol. Sci. 100. Coral Reefs.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered Jan. 7 To Feb. 25 with Final Exam on Feb. 25 or Arranged.

Instructor(s): Kyger Lohmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 156 (or 260). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/~kacey/ugrad/courses.html

Coral Reefs will be an in-depth tour of the biological and physical processes active in modern reef systems to provide a detailed understanding of the ecology of the individual organisms and the complex nature of their interactions within the reef community. Evolution of the reef community will be examined, ranging from the crude framework structures formed over one billion years ago by primitive algae to the luxuriant and diversified reefs of the modern-day oceans, to define the evolutionary strategies of reef building organisms. By tracking these evolutionary strategies through geologic time, the implications of man's intervention with the Earth's hydrosphere and atmosphere on the character of future reef communities will be considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Geol. Sci. 104. Ice Ages, Past and Future.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Will Be Offered Jan. 7 To Feb. 25 With Final Exam on Feb. 25 or Arranged

Instructor(s): John Hoaglund (hoaglund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 151 (or 275). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course looks at the effects of present and past glaciations on the landscape and on life, humans in particular. Glaciers are examined as dynamic, climatically controlled systems of moving ice. Climatic and environmental changes concurrent with glaciation, in both continental and oceanic realms, are reviewed. The causes of the ice ages that have dominated the Earth for the past two million years and predictions of future ice ages are examined in the light of current geological and climatic research. The course consists of lectures, one hour exam, and one final exam. Required Course Materials: Course Pack. Recommended Textbook: Ice Age Earth, Late Quaternary Geology and Climate, Dawson, A.G., 1992, Routledge, New York, NY ISBN 0-415-01567-7

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Open and Available

Geol. Sci. 104. Ice Ages, Past and Future.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 002 Will Be Offered March 9 To April 20 With Final Exam on April 20 or Arranged. Drop/Add deadline: March 22

Instructor(s): John Hoaglund (hoaglund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 151 (or 275). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course looks at the effects of present and past glaciations on the landscape and on life, humans in particular. Glaciers are examined as dynamic, climatically controlled systems of moving ice. Climatic and environmental changes concurrent with glaciation, in both continental and oceanic realms, are reviewed. The causes of the ice ages that have dominated the Earth for the past two million years and predictions of future ice ages are examined in the light of current geological and climatic research. The course consists of lectures, one hour exam, and one final exam. Required Course Materials: Course Pack. Recommended Textbook: Ice Age Earth, Late Quaternary Geology and Climate, Dawson, A.G., 1992, Routledge, New York, NY ISBN 0-415-01567-7

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Geol. Sci. 106. Fossils, Primates, and Human Evolution.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered Jan. 7 To Feb. 25 With Final Exam on Feb. 25 or Arranged

Instructor(s): Philip Gingerich (gingeric@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 125. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Anatomical and behavioral characteristics of living primates are reviewed, and the fossil record is used to document the course of human evolution through the past 60 million years. No special background is required. Students seeking a more detailed course with laboratory exercises may follow this with Geology 438 (Evolution of the Primates). Course consists of 12 lectures, and a one-hour final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Open and Available

Geol. Sci. 107. Volcanoes and Earthquakes.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered March 9 to April 20 with Final Exam on April 20 or Arranged. Drop/Add deadline: March 22

Instructor(s): Rebecca Lange (becky@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 205, 146, or 147 (or 270 or 271). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is a study of the earth in action and includes the following topics: geography of earthquakes and volcanoes; catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism; volcanic rocks; volcanic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; volcanism and geothermal energy; manmade earthquakes; and earthquake prediction and control. Instruction by lecture, evaluation on basis of quizzes and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Open and Available

Geol. Sci. 115. Geologic Time.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered March 9 To April 20 With Final Exam on April 20 or Arranged. Drop/Add deadline: March 22

Instructor(s): Eric Essene (essene@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 135 or 145 (or 269). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Until the middle of the 18th century the Earth was generally thought to be less than 10,000 years old, and according to many, close to its apocolyptic end. We now know that the Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago and that the entire history of mankind is nothing but the latest tiny fraction of Earth history. The formation of rocks, continental drift, volcanoes, and earthquakes is evaluated in the framework of geologic time and plate tectonics. The discovery of time from the Renaissance to the latest high tech developments in radioactive dating is reviewed. Finally, the history of planet Earth will be described including its accretion out of dust and giant impacts, the origin of the Moon, the formation of the atmosphere and oceans, the development of life and the building of continents. The course will draw upon examples meaningful to the student to illustrate the principles. Lectures twice weekly for half the term. Course pack provides most of the diagrams. A final one hour examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3, 4

Honors 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 001 Complexity and Emergence. (2 credits). Meet January 26 through February 25. Drop/Add deadline: February 8

Instructor(s): John Holland

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many of our most perplexing problems inner city decay, trade balances, control of epidemics, and effective education, to name a few arise when a large number of individuals interact and, in the process, adapt to each other. Such systems are called complex adaptive systems. Simple reduction, where we sum up the activity of the parts to get the behavior of the whole, does not work for these systems. The whole is genuinely more than the sum of the parts for complex adaptive systems, a phenomenon called emergence.The object of this course is to give a broad understanding of complex adaptive systems, both the form of the problems that attend such systems and the ways of approaching such problems. Along the way we will look into the creative process, particularly as it occurs in the "two great P's of human intellectual endeavor, Poetry and Physics.".eadings: Roughly 200 pages selected from HIDDEN ORDER and EMERGENCE (both books authored by Professor Holland and published by Addison-Wesley).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 001 Jewelry Making and Metal Working. Drop/Add deadline: February 11

Instructor(s): Annie O'Kane

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

LHSP encourages all of you to develop your artistic talents, especially if you're not in the School of Art. Because studio art classes at the University are restricted to art majors, we offer you the following professionally taught courses in your own art room. Our studio art classes are open to all students and require absolutely no previous training or experience in art.

Have you ever wanted to design your own necklace? Or give a good friend a ring you made especially for her/him? Or sculpt an object in metal?

In this class you will learn the basics of metal working by designing and constructing your own pieces of jewelry or metal objects. You will receive instruction in designing, forming, joining, and stone setting using copper, brass, nickel, silver, and semi-precious stones. LHSP will provide some start-up materials for its members, but all students are responsible for providing their own art supplies. This class begins on February 4, 1999.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 002 Creative Drama and Performance Art. Class begins January 19, 1999. Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Drop/Add deadline: February 1

Instructor(s): Decky Alexander

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Creative drama/improvisation are theatrical approaches which use group centered spontaneous games and exercises in order to increase one's own social and emotional development. Students in this course will have an opportunity to participate, design and observe such activities as a means of strengthening individual identity, increasing public speaking skills and presence and developing critical thinking strategies through small group work. In short, this is a non-presentational drama class, where students will be encouraged to play, to risk and to reflect. Dress comfy.

Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 003 Introduction to Fiction Writing. Class begins January 20, 1999. Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Drop/Add deadline: February 9

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsly

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing fiction is like no other game in town. There are no limits. Some would argue there aren't even rules. But there ARE some requirements at least if it's to be any good. This course will examine those requirements and provide students with a working knowledge of the "limits" within which they have all the freedom in the world. We'll be reading selected works of short fiction by modern and contemporary writers, as a way of seeing what some of these limitless options are. It'll be work, of course, but in ways you've never dreamed.

Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 004 Introduction to Photography: Devloping and Printing. Class begins January 21, 1999. Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Drop/Add deadline: February 10

Instructor(s): Lisa S. Powers

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Learn the basics of how to use a darkroom to print from photo negatives, as well as learn how to develop film. Alternative printing techniques such as solarization, photograms, and other special effects also covered.

Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 005 In Your Face: A Comedy Class. Class begins January 25, 1999. Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Drop/Add deadline: February 5

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Steiger

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class, you will explore comedy as a means to challenge yourself and each other. By examining your own perceptions and beliefs about alcohol, politics, studying, student life, sex, and race, you will help create a show that challenges an audience to do the same. We will play improv games, discuss literature, and write in journals, taking the most dangerous discoveries to perform. Our final show, performed in Alice Lloyd on the last day of class, will be a culmination of all of our work. But don't be scared it's just comedy. You're required to keep of a journal, help write a script, and attend a live performance.

Restricted to Students Enrolled in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Physics 105. Origin, and Fate of Life, Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe.

Section 001 Meets March 9 April 20. Drop/Add deadline: March 22

Instructor(s): Fred Adams (fca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will cover the birth, evolution, and death of astrophysical systems including planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe as a whole. Particular emphasis will be given to the long-term fate of these systems and their corresponding effects on life in the universe. Two lectures per week will be given. Students will read articles from selected books and journals and will be evaluated on both class participation and a final ten-page paper. This course has no prerequisites and will be presented with a minimum of mathematics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Transportation and Society. (1 credit). Meets with Urban Planning 670/SNRE 670

Instructor(s): Jonathan Levine (jlevine@umich.edu), Burton Barnes (bvb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an interdisciplinary seminar designed to address how the emerging transportation system can be designed and implemented so as to help address some of the larger social concerns in the country. In what ways has transportation created social and environmental problems, and how can transportation be a solution to problems? Outside experts lecture with each session focusing on a single topic. Participation by interested faculty, auditors, transportation professionals and interested community members is welcomed. A buffet lunch is served.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 The Development of Psychological Research in Africa. (1 credit). Meeets with CAAS 490.002. Meets March 8-April 14. Drop/Add deadline: March 12

Instructor(s): Denis Chima Ugwuegbu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 490.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 404. Field Practicum.

Section 052 Social Psychology of Intergroup Relations. Staff Housing Course. Starts Feb. 9. (2 Credits). Drop/Add deadline: February 22

Instructor(s): Patricia Gurin (pgurin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-12).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course for residence hall staff will focus on issues of intergroup relations in living communities. Participants will focus on their roles in facilitating learning as a transformative process for students living in residence halls. The course will build teams of skilled learning facilitators who can address issues of intergroup relations in multicultural contexts within living communities, including intergroup conflict, intergroup communication, exploration of identity, and the use of power and privilege within systems. Student development, social justice, and identity development theories will provide a context for students to develop the knowledge and skills needed for providing leadership, support, and facilitation of learning in residential settings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of Instructor

Psych. 501. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Developmental Research Convention. (2 Credits). Meets on 1-26, 2-2, 2-9, 2-16, 2-23, 3-9, 3-23, 4-6, & 4-20. Requires Attendance At SRCD Convention. Drop/Add deadline: February 8

Instructor(s): John Hagen (jwhagen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to prepare students to attend and take maximum advantage of the Society for Research in Child Development (SCRD) meetings in Albuquerque, New Mexico, from April 15-18, 1999. SCRD is the major professional society in the field of child development. More than 5,000 scholars and students attend this meeting, which is held only once every two years. Over 2,000 presentations will be made by leading researchers and practitioners over a wide range of topics and issues. Students will learn about various methods for research as well as the latest progress and trends in developmental research through readings, brief lectures, and discussions. Students will be asked to choose research topics of particular interest to investigate at the meetings. Requirements include a log and a term paper that, along with the participation, will be used in determining the grade in the class. The class meets from 3:00-5:00 on the following Tuesdays: January 26th, February 2nd, 9th, 16th, 23rd, March 9th, 23, April 6th and 20th. Students will be responsible for the cost of transportation, hotel, registration, and food. The hotel should cost about $30-40 per night with two or three people to a room. Registration will be less expensive via a membership to SRCD, which students are encouraged to obtain. The cost for undergraduate student affiliates is $20 per year. Contact either Professor Hagen (998-6578 or jwhagen@umich.edu) or Brent Lignell (764-2443) for more information.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001 Students Seeking Two Hours of Credit, See Instructor. Section 001 Prerequisite: Intermediate Ability in Playing an Orchestral/Band Instrument

Instructor(s): Maria Barna (barkar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No audition is required. All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles can enroll for one or two hours of credit. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of strings and winds; brass quintet; string quartet; woodwind quintet, and some other duos and trios, including piano and harpsichord.

Requirements for one credit hour consist of participation in two ensembles; for 2 credits one must participate in the large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week and participation in one or more concerts per term, if appropriate. Course may be used to meet the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 Women's Choral Ensemble

Instructor(s): Wendy Looker (wlooker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music from the vast Women's Chorus Repertoire. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 002 Mixed Choral Ensemble

Instructor(s): Wendy Looker (wlooker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Four-part works from a variety of musical styles are rehearsed and prepared for performance in concert. Meets twice weekly. Vocal skills, sight singing, musicianship and ensemble singing are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 351. Creative Musicianship Lab.

Music

Section 001 Required for those taking 350; Others Welcome

Instructor(s): Jane Heirich

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 350. (1-2). (CE).

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a required lab course to be taken with Humanities 350, however, it can be taken by itself. It will deal with the three basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony) through music reading, notation, singing, use of ear-training tapes, and computer lab programs. The class will be divided into three or four sections according to ability and experience levels. Each section meets together as a group, and students will also work individually and with a lab partner. It may be elected for either one or two credits, depending on the amount of work one chooses to do. Attendance at both Tuesday and Thursday class sessions is necessary whether you are taking the lab for one or two credits. Advanced students may be exempted from taking this lab on permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Interdiv. 350. Special Topics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in an associated course. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


REES 405. Topics in Russian and East European Studies.

Section 001 The Czech New Wave. (1 credit). Meets January 19, 26 and February 2, 9, 16, 23. Meets With Slavic 490.003. Films Will Be Screened 7-9 P.M. Drop/Add deadline: February 1

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

ARTS Mini/short course

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The fresh approaches of the Czech New Wave directors surprised the world in the mid-1960's. A new generation of filmmakers displayed an impressive range of styles from the gentle comic grotesque of Jiri Menzel (Closely Watched Trains Academy Award, Best Foreign Film 1967), the menacing absurdism of Jan Nemec and the dadaist satire of Vera Chytilova to the pseudo-cinema-verite of Milos Forman (Loves of a Blonde) and the nuanced psychological realism of Jan Kadar (Shop on Main Street Academy Award, Best Foreign Film 1965). The films were not only artistically innovative, they were often subversive with respect to the bureaucratic Communism of the Novotny regime. The filmmakers exposed the constant repression, the loss of moral and civic values, the lack of meaningful prospects for youth, the subservience of women to a patriarchal order, and the regime's fostering of antisemitism. The films worked in clever allegorical ways, skirting the Communist censorship.The movement in film was a harbinger of the Prague Spring, the reform movement led by Alexander Dubcek. And the Czech New Wave directors suffered the same fate as the political reformers (repression and blacklisting) after the Soviet-led invasion in August 1968. Menzel's Larks on a String, the final masterpiece of the Czech New Wave, was banned from distribution until after the fall of Communism in 1989.We will view and discuss six films with an eye to artistic innovations as well as with attention to the social and political realities to which the films allude. One short (5-6 page) paper due at the end of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

REES 410. Polish Culture.

Section 001 Polish Cinema. Meets March 9, 16, 23, 30, and April 6, 13. Meets With Slavic 490.004. Films Will Be Shown from 7-9 P.M. Drop/Add deadline: March 15

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($10) required. May be repeated for a total of two credits.

ARTS Mini/short

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since the 1950's, Polish filmmakers have distinguished themselves through challenging cinema, in spite of the Communist Party censorship. After WWII, the film industry was nationalized and rapidly rebuilt, with a State Film School established at Lodz. Within a few years, the school's first wave of graduates (which included Wajda, Munk, and Polanski) had garnered international prizes at Cannes and elsewhere. Although directors were expected to adhere to the principles of "Socialist Realism" (which required an idealized Communist version of the past and present), these filmmakers were able to use intricate symbolism, absurdist allegory, and subtle satire to condemn the loss of decency and civic values in Communist society.Throughout the 1970's and 1980's, Wajda and a new generation of innovative filmmakers (among them Zanussi, Holland, Has, and Kieslowski) continued to break new ground. Wajda's films and Zanussi's contrasted the hypocrisy and opportunism of the establishment with youth's idealism; Has used surrealism to translate to the screen classic works of fiction; Holland brought gender issues to the fore. Kieslowski consistently tackled tough moral problems, and was the first to critique post-Communist Poland, in his celebrated White. We will view and discuss six films with an eye to artistic developments and trends, as well as with attention to the social and political events and situations to which the films refer. One short (5-6 page) paper due at the end of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Slavic 490. Culture and Politics in Russia Today.

Section 003 The Czech New Wave. Meets January 19, 26 and February 2, 9, 16, 23. Meets With REES 405.001. Drop/Add deadline: February 1

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

ARTS Mini/short

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 405.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Slavic 490. Culture and Politics in Russia Today.

Section 004 Polish Film. Meets March 9, 16, 23, 30, and April 6, 13. Meets With REES 410.001. Films will be shown from 7-9 P.M. Drop/Add deadline: March 15

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

ARTS Mini/short

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 410.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Slavic 490. Culture and Politics in Russia Today.

Section 005 Poetics of the Verse Text: Technique of Analysis and Interpretation. Taught in Russian. Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays: March 9, 11, 16, 18, 23, 25, and 30. Drop/Add deadline: March 12

Instructor(s): Boris Gasparov

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Mini/short

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will discuss:

  1. Immanent poetics and intertextual poetics. The former describes "simple" poems; the later, "complex" ones; the former presupposes analysis; the latter, interpretation.
  2. A chapter from the history of Russian poetics: B.I. Iarkho (1899-1942) and his outline of literary criticism as an exact science. The levels of construction; sounds and verse; language and style; images and ideas. Computing the units of every level. Composition at every level, and the overall composition of a work as a whole.
  3. Practical strategy of analysis: how to begin; how to go on; how to face possible difficulties (material for study; "simple" poems by Pushkin and Fet).
  4. Practical strategy of interpretation: how to begin, how to proceed, and where to stop (material for study: "complex" poems by Briusov (of the later period), Mandelstam, and Pasternak).
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 103. 21st Century Program Seminar: Academic Decision Making.

Section 001 Students Must be Enrolled in the 21st Century Program. Mini course meets Jan 13 March 3

Instructor(s): Marita Inglehart

Prerequisites & Distribution: 21st Century Program participant. (1). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


UCourses 290. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 Everyday Life and the Russian Imagination. 1-Credit Language Across the Curriculum Mini-Course Will Meet on the Following Dates: January 25 & 27, February 1, 3, 8, 10, & 15. Prerequisite: Russian 202. Drop/Add deadline: February 5

Instructor(s): Joseph Peschio (jpeschio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Russian word byt refers generally to the behaviors and material milieu of "everyday life" that are included in descriptions of a given people's way of life. There is, however, also a vast ideological component to everyday life; everything around us contributes to our world view. This course will explore the historical and contemporary interface of these objects, behaviors and beliefs using a wide array of Russian discourse from the last 250 years films, literary texts, television commercials, anthropological investigations, and historical works. The course's emphasis is on expanding students' Russian skills, so classes and classwork will be conducted mostly in Russian.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 390. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 America Through Russian Eyes. 1-Credit Language Across the Curriculum Mini-Course Will Meet on the Following Dates: March 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24 & 29. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Russian 202. Drop/Add deadline: March 12

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Most of us are familiar with the images and stereotypes of Russians which have evolved throughout this century in American film, literature and mass media. But what about the ways that Russians view us? What kinds of things have Russians been saying about America and Americans in the past century? How have their views of America changed in conjunction with the political and cultural transformations of the past hundred years in Russia and the Soviet Union? In this course we'll look at a variety of materials, including film, art, literature and mass media, in an attempt to locate and understand the images of America which Russians have created and lived by. We'll chart the evolution of Russians' portrayal of America from pre-revolutionary times, through the Cold War, Perestroika and up to the present. The majority of class materials and discussions will be in Russian, and class sessions will be designed to help students learn and practice the vocabulary and grammar needed to have meaningful discussions of this topic in Russian. Students will be expected to submit brief written responses to the readings in Russian, as well as a short final essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Women's St. 111. Women in Popular Culture.

Section 001 Good Mother, Bad Mother: Representations of Mothers in TV and Film. Mini-Course Meets Jan. 7 To Feb. 18

Instructor(s): Stitt

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Theme Semester ARTS Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This mini-course examines mothers in their many manifestations in film and television. The class will start with two early black and white films, Stella Dallas (1937) and Mildred Pierce (1945) which question the possibilities for women working outside the home and working class women to be good mothers. Moving on to 50s television favorites such as I Love Lucy, Leave it to Beaver, Ozzie and Harriet, and The Donna Reed Show, we will look at who counts as a good mother and why. We will then compare these earlier works to television shows of the 1960s and 70s such as the Brady Bunch, The Partridge Family, Julia, Good Times, and One Day at a Time which feature single mothers or blended families. We will also look at the ultimate in bad mother films: Mommie Dearest. This film raises questions about the ways in which representing Mom can be source of revenge. Finishing with more contemporary shows such as The Cosby Show, Roseanne, and Mad About You, we will look at what aspects of mothering on TV have changed over the years and what has stayed the same. Our final class will focus on the 1998 TV special The Wedding produced by Oprah Winfrey and starring Halle Berry. What does this made-for-television film have to say about questions of mothering within interracial families? Topics to be addressed include: mothers of color, bad and good mothers, single mothers, working class mothers, mothers and sexuality, rebellious children, and feminist critiques of visual representations of mothering.

Students will be encouraged to examine representations of mothering in their own communities, as well as to engage with the issues raised by being children of television. Class requirements include six short journal reactions and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Women's St. 112. Issues for Women of Color.

Section 001 African American Women's Health and Social Issues. Mini Course Meets Jan 7 To Feb 18

Instructor(s): Carla Stokes

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Theme Semester Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

African-American women are confronted with a multitude of physical and emotional health challenges. This mini course will explore interrelated social, political, cultural, and economic factors contributing to the poor health status of African-American women.Course discussions and readings will address various health issues including HIV/AIDS, infant mortality, life expectancy, stress, and access to health care. Material will be drawn from the health and social sciences, and major emphasis will be on the impact of poverty, racism, sexism, and economic inequality on African-American women. Students will also examine how images of African-American women influence this population's health outcomes. Special attention will be given to African-American women's strengths, solidarity, and ability to persist despite social inequality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.