Concentrations & Minors

Russian

The Russian major aims to combine, in the best traditions of a liberal arts degree, practical language learning with the study of culture through literature and culture. It provides extensive language training and demanding courses in literary history and analysis. Moreover, the Department firmly believes that serious language study offers broad intellectual benefits in and of itself.

Major RequirementsRussian

Prerequisites to Concentration: Russian 101, 102, 201, and 202, (or Russian 103 and 203 or Russian 123 and 223) or the equivalent. Interested students are encouraged to begin Russian during their first year.

Concentration Program:
Russian Language and Literature

  1. Core Courses: Russian 301 (or RCLANG 323) and 302 or Russian 303; Russian 451 or 499; Russian 347 and 348; and at least one course in Russian literature after 1900 (e.g., Russian 361, 450, 467, 468, 469, 470, 471, 472, 475)
  2. Upper-level Russian language and literature electives: at least two courses (in addition to those listed above) from Russian 401, 402, 410, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 418, 419, 420, 453, 454, 455, 456, 460, 461, 462, 463, 464, 465, 466, 476, and 485.
  3. Cognate for Russian Language and Literature: three or more credits in advanced courses (300-level or above) in:
  • cognate courses studying some other aspect of Russia (special attention is called to the courses listed under Russian and East European Studies), or;
  • another Slavic language (Czech, BCS, Ukrainian, or Polish), or;
  • another foreign language.

 

B. Culture track (sub-plan)

  1. Core Courses: Russian 231 or Slavic 270; Russian 301 (or RCLANG 323), and 302; Russian 401 and 402; Russian 499 or 451.
  2. Upper-level electives for Culture Subplan: At least two of Russian 322, Russian 477, Slavic 313, Russian 358, Slavic 481, Russian 347 or 348.
  3. Cognate requirement for Russian Language and Literature.

C. Heritage Speakers track (sub-plan)

  1. Prerequisites for Heritage Speakers Subplan: Russian 225 or 202, or equivalent, or placement in an upper level course; and Russian 231.

  2. Core Courses for Heritage Speakers Subplan: Russian 325 or 302, or equivalent; Russian 401, 402, 501, and 502; two of Russian 451, Russian 499, RCLANG 323.
  3. Upper-level electives for Heritage Speakers Subplan: At least two of Russian 347, 348, 361, 450, or other literature courses with permission of advisor.
  4. Cognate requirement for Russian Language and Literature.

Minor RequirementsRussian

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor: Russian 201 or equivalent.

Academic Minor Program: Russian 202 or 203 or 223 or RCLANG 293, and 12 additional credits in courses selected from among the following, with at least 6 credits elected at the upper level.

  • RUSSIAN 231, 301, 302, 303, 322, 346, 347, 348, 357, 358, 361, 450, 451, 453, 462, 463, 464, 466, 469, 474, 478, 479, 499
  • SLAVIC 240, 313, 315, and 316

Typical Courses OfferedRussian

Russian
Course No. Typically Offered Course Title
101.001 Fall First Year Russian
101.002 Fall First Year Russian
102.001 Fall; Winter First Year Russian
102.002 Winter First Year Russian
103 F Int First Year Russian
201 F; W Second Year Russian
202 W Second Year Russian
203.001 W Intro: Second Year, Recitation
203.002 W Intro: Second Year, Lecture
225 F Russian Heritage
301 F Third Year Russian
302 W Third year Russian
316 F; W Russian Service Learning
322 F Russia Today
325 W Russian Heritage II
347 F Survey of Russian Literature
348.001 W Survey Russian Lit, Lecture
348.002   Survey Russian Lit, Discussion
348.003   Survey Russian Lit, Discussion
348.004   Survey Russian Lit, Discussion
357   Russian Drama in Context
358 F Central Asia/Russian Eyes
365 W Russian Fantasy and Science Fiction
401 F Fourth Year Russian
402 W Fourth Year Russian
410 F Teaching Russian
430 F; W Supervised Reading
435 W Cultural History Russian Jews
461 W Pushkin
463 W Chekhov
469 F 20th Century Russian Authors
471 F Modern Poetry
479 W Nabokov & Lit II
491 F Senior Honors
492 W Senior Honors
499 W Adv Seminar Russian
519 F Fifth-Year Russian
520 W Fifth Year Russian
552 F Literature-18th Century
558 F Russia/Central Asian Culture
576 W Structure Russian
616 F; W Russian Service Learning
651 F Supervised Reading & Literature
652 W Supervised Reading & Literature
852 F 19th C. Literature
854 W Early 19 C.  Literature
855 W Chekhov
862 F Seminar: 20th C. Literature
990 F Dissertation Pre-Candidate
995 F; W Dissertation Candidate

Polish

Our Polish program has been exceptionally successful over the past decade, and it continues to grow. Language courses are the core, with offerings including First, Second, Third, and Fourth Year Polish. U-M is the only American university to offer four levels of Polish every year.

Major RequirementsPolish

Prerequisites to Concentration: Polish 121, 122, 221, and 222, or the equivalent.

Concentration Program: (27 credits). At least 15 of the 27 credits must be upper-level (300 or above).

  1. Polish Language: 6-12 credits of POLISH 321, 322, 421, 422; or equivalent
  2. Polish Literature: 6-9 credits of POLISH 325, 326, 432
  3. Polish Culture: 6-9 credits of POLISH 214, 215, 314, 450, SLAVIC 490*
  4. Electives. 3-9 credits of:
    •   SLAVIC 225, 240, 270, 312, 396, 490* (Polish topics);
    •   HISTORY 330, 331
    •   REEES 396

* (appropriate sections of SLAVIC 490 include “Rocks Kill Communism” and “Revolution in the Attic”)

Up to two terms of another Slavic language (Bosnian / Croatian / Serbian, Czech, Russian, Ukrainian) can also be counted as electives; see department for additional course options.

Residence Requirement.  At least 15 of the 27 required credits must be taken in residence or through a study abroad program affiliated with the University of Michigan. 

Study Abroad credit my count toward the concentration.  Please consult with the Polish advisor prior to studying abroad.

Minor RequirementsPolish

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor. POLISH 121, 122, and 221, or equivalent.

Academic Minor Program. 16 credits of courses; at least 6 of which must be taken at the upper level (300 or above):

  1. Polish language: POLISH 222, or equivalent
  2. Polish literature and culture: 6 credits in POLISH 214, 215, 314, 325, 326, 432, 450, SLAVIC 490*
  3. Electives:
  • 6 credits in SLAVIC 225, 240, 270, 312, 396, 423, 490 (appropriate sections*)
  • HISTORY 330, 331
  • Up to three credits of Third-Year Polish (POLISH 321 and 322) may be counted.

See department for additional course options

*(appropriate sections of SLAVIC 490 include “Rocks Kill Communism” and “Revolution in the Attic”)

Residence Requirement. At least 8 of the 16 required credits must be taken in residence or through a study abroad program affiliated with the University of Michigan.

Study Abroad credit my count toward the academic minor. Please consult with the Polish advisor prior to studying abroad.

Typical Courses OfferedPolish

Polish
Course No. Typically Offered Course Title
121 F First Year Polish
122 W First Year Polish
214 W Rock Poetry and Political Protest in Poland
215 F Heart of Europe: Poland Today
221 F Second Year Polish
222 W Second Year Polish
314 W Polish Cinema
321 F Third Year Polish
322 W Third Year Polish
325 W (offered every other year) Polish Literature in English to 1890
326 W (offered every other year) Polish Literature in English Since 1890
421 F Fourth Year Polish
422 W Fourth Year Polish
450 F; W Directed Reading
525 F Early Polish Literature
526 W 20th Century Polish Literature
621 F Directed Reading: Polish Literature
622 W Directed Reading: Polish Literature

 

Czech

Czech studies have a long tradition at Michigan and have grown over the years. Faculty members doing teaching and research in this field include Professors Herbert Eagle, who specializes in Czech film, Jindrich Toman, who specializes in Czech Modernism, and Ewa Malachowska-Pasek who specializes in Czech language. Literature courses include Czech 484, Modern Czech Literature, taught by Professor Toman. The course teaches twentieth century Czech literature in translation, but includes film and visual arts as well

Minor RequirementsCzech

Program Requirements:

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor: Czech 241 or equivalent.

Academic Minor Program: 16 credits of courses, including Czech 242 (4 credits) and 12 credits in courses selected from among the following two categories, with at least 6 credits coming from category B.

Category A: Courses on Central European Slavic Culture
No more than 6 credits from this category

  • Slavic 225 (Arts & Cultures of Central Europe)
  • Slavic 312 (Central European Cinema)
  • Slavic 423 (Central European Literature in the Twentieth Century)

Students may count up to 3 credits of Third-Year Czech (Czech 341/342)

Category B: Courses on Czech culture, literature, and cinema
At least 6 credits are required from this category

  • Czech 480 (Supervised Czech Reading)
  • Czech 483 (Czech Literature from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment)
  • Czech 484 (Modern Czech Literature)
  • Slavic 470 (The Avant-Gardes)
  • Slavic 490 (Issues of the Cultures of Eastern Europe)

Typical Courses OfferedCzech

Czech
Course No. Typically Offered Course Title
141 F First Year Czech
142 W First Year Czech
241 F Second Year Czech
242 W Second Year Czech
315 F Czech Cinema
480 F; W Supv. Czech Reading
484 W Modern Czech Literature

Ukrainian

U-M is the only North American University to offer a minor in Ukrainian Studies. The academic minor in Ukrainian is a multi-faceted program  that integrates Ukrainian studies into broader intellectual and policy agendas while promoting research and scholarly work on contemporary Ukraine in the United States.

Minor RequirementsUkrainian

Program Requirements:

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor: UKR 251 (with a grade of “C” or better) or equivalent as determined by the Departmental placement examination.

Academic Minor Program: 16 credits of courses, including UKR 252 (4 credits) and 12 credits in courses selected from the following two categories, with at least 6 credits coming from category A.

Category A: Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture
At least 6 credits from this category

  • UKR 351 (3rd Year Ukrainian I)
  • UKR 352 (3rd Year Ukrainian II)
  • UKR 421 (Directed Readings in Ukrainian Literature)
  • UKR 320 (An Introduction to Ukrainian Poetry)
  • UKR 470 (Cultures of Ukraine)
  • SLAVIC 490 (Topic: Introduction to Ukrainian Culture)

Category B: Eastern European Slavic Culture
No more than 6 credits from this category

  • HISTORY 432 (Medieval and Early Modern Russia)
  • SLAVIC 240 (Slavic Folklore)
  • SLAVIC 270 (Contact and Conflict: Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe)
  • SLAVIC 313 (Russian and Ukrainian Cinema)
  • SLAVIC 395 (Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States)
  • RUSSIAN 435 (Cultural History of the Russian Jew)
  • SLAVIC 490 (Topics: Rock Kills Communism; Revolution the Attic)
  • (Up to 3 Credits) Study Abroad, Summer Internships in Ukraine and/or Field Work in Ukrainian Communities in Metro Detroit. The Department offers to help in negotiating summer internships with companies in Ukraine or within local Ukrainian communities.

Typical Courses OfferedUkrainian

Ukrainian
Course No. Typically Offered Course Title
151 F First Year Ukrainian
152 W First Year Ukrainian
251 F Second Year Ukrainian
252 W Second Year Ukrainian
320/520 W Ukrainian Poetry
421 F; W Directed Reading: Ukrainian Literature
470 F Cultures of Ukraine

Bosnian / Croatian / Serbian

The department teaches the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Slavic nations. The curriculum provides the language training prerequisite to specialization in a variety of careers (e.g., government, diplomacy, international trade, teaching), and offers an enriching cultural and linguistic background to non-concentrators, especially those interested in the ethnic heritage of the Slavic peoples.

Minor RequirementsBosnian/Croatian/Serbian

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor. BCS 131, 132, and 231, or equivalent, as determined by the departmental placement examination.

Academic Minor Program. 16 credits of courses, including BCS 232 (4 credits) and 12 credits in courses selected from the following two categories, with at least 6 credits from Category A and no more than 6 credits from Category B:

Category A: BCS Courses Language, Literature, and Culture. Courses in Category A encourage students to continue their language study through literary classes and individualized work with an instructor, concentrating on BCS culture, literature and history.

  • BCS 350 / JUDAIC 350 / REEES 350. Legacy of the Holocaust in Yugoslav Culture: How and Why We Need to Narrate the Holocaust
  • BCS 436. Modern Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Literature
  • BCS 437. Yugoslav Literature of Exile: Nowhere People-Exiles from the State of Ideology
  • BCS 439. Directed Reading of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Literature
  • HISTORY 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878
  • SLAVIC 471. Seminar in Cultural Studies of Central, Eastern and Southern Europe, section entitled “Technologies of Memory”

Category B: Courses on Central/Eastern European Slavic Culture. Category B courses place the cultural space of the Western Balkans (the area where BCS is spoken) into a larger Central European political, cultural and historical context.

  • POLISH 215. Heart of Europe: Poland Today
  • SLAVIC 225. Arts and Cultures of Central Europe
  • SLAVIC 312 / RCHUMS 312. Central European Cinema
  • SLAVIC 423. Central European Literature in the Twentieth Century
  • SLAVIC 490. Issues in the Cultures of Eastern Europe  (appropriate topics)
  • REEES 405. Topics in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (appropriate topics)

 

Typical Courses OfferedBosnian / Croatian / Serbian

Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian
Course No. Typically Offered Course Title
131 F (even years) First Year BCS
132 W First Year BCS
231 F (odd years) Second Year BCS I
232 W Second Year BCS II
350 W Legacy of the Holocaust in Yugoslav Literature
436 W Modern BCS Literature (Topics)
437 F Yugoslav Literature of Exile
439 F; W Directed Reading of BCS

Cultures and Literatures of East Europe

This program has been designed specifically for students who have either become interested in Slavic Studies later in their academic careers and are thus unable to complete a language requirement; or are in a demanding concentration program that does not include flexibility to take on an extensive course of language study but are interested in the literatures and cultures of Eastern Europe. A student completing this minor will have acquired detailed knowledge in at least one area of the Department's specializations, while also having been exposed to the diversity of cultures found between the Danube and the Pacific Ocean.

Minor RequirementCultures and Literatures of East Europe

Program Requirements:

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor: None. No knowledge of the languages of Eastern Europe is required.

Academic Minor Program: At least 15 credits elected in the following courses in Eastern European Literatures and cultures, of which only one course may be below the 300-level. Students may take as many courses as they like in one of the two groups, but must elect a minimum of 6 credits in the other group.

Group A:

  • Polish 214, 215, 314, 325, 326
  • Czech 315, 484
  • BCS 436
  • Slavic 225, 240, 270, 312, 470, 481, 488, 490
  • UKR 470

Group B:

  • Slavic 313, 315, 316
  • Russian 231, 322, 346, 347, 348, 356, 358, 361, 444, 450, 453, 454, 460, 462, 463, 464, 466, 467, 468, 469, 473, 474

Typical Courses OfferedCultures and Literatures of East Europe

BCS 350 - Legacy of the Holocaust in Yugoslav Culture: How and Why We Need to Narrate the Holocaust
BCS 436 – Modern BCS Literature; topics vary by semester/check course guide for topics


CZECH 315 - The Czech New Wave and Its Legacy
CZECH 484 – Modern Czech Lit


POLISH 214 – Rock Poetry and Political Protest in Poland
POLISH 215 – Heart of Europe: Poland Today
POLISH 314 - Polish Cinema - Typically offered in Winter
POLISH 325 – Polish Literature in English to 1890
POLISH 326/526 – Polish Literature in English: 1890 to Present - Typically offered in Winter, every other year


RUSSIAN 322- Russia Today: Culture & Identity in a “Multi-national” State - Typically offered in Fall/Spring
RUSSIAN 347- Survey of Russian Literature - Typically offered in Fall
RUSSIAN 361- Russian Modernism: Decadence, Symbolism, and the Avant-garde in Russia
RUSSIAN 357 - Russian Drama in Context: From the Enlightenment to Post-Modernism
RUSSIAN 348 - Survey of Russian Literature  - Typically offered in Winter
RUSSIAN 435 - Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and the Arts
RUSSIAN 474 - Late 20th-Century Russian Literature
RUSSIAN 461 - Pushkin
RUSSIAN 463 – Chekhov
RUSSIAN 479 - Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years
RUSSIAN 499 – Advanced Seminar, Russian


SLAVIC 225 – Art & Culture: Central Europe
SLAVIC 270 – Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe through Art, Film and Literature
SLAVIC 290 (1 credit minicourse) – Studies in E. European Culture
SLAVIC 312 – Central European Cinema
SLAVIC 313 – Russian/Ukrainian Film
SLAVIC 316 – RUSLAN Service Learning
SLAVIC 395 – Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States
SLAVIC 396 – Survey of Central and Eastern Europe and the Enlarged European Union
SLAVIC 470 – Culture of Eastern Europe; topics vary by semester/check course guide for topics
SLAVIC 471 – Seminar in Cultural Studies; topics vary by semester/check course guide for topics
SLAVIC 490 (1 credit minicourse) – Cultures of E. Europe; topics vary by semester/check course guide for topics
UKR 470 - Cultures of Ukraine