Current Graduate Students

To see where our graduates have landed, look here.

Robyn d'Avignon, robdavig@umich.edu
Program in Anthropology and History
Current research: politics of development, informal economies and histories of natural resource extraction in Francophone West Africa. I am currently conducting ethnographic and historic research in Senegal on contestations over access to land, labor and knowledge in the remote region of Kedougou, the site of an industrial and artisanal gold mining boom. I formerly worked for Peace Corps Senegal as an agriculture volunteer. I have also conducted research on African migration to Belgium and on the history of labor on contract chicken farms in the American South.

Matthew Burton, mcburton@umich.edu
School of Information

Current research: scientific data production in the earth and environmental sciences.

**Ayse G. Buyuktur, abuyuktu@umich.edu
School of Information
Program research: cyberinfrastructure and values in design.

Melissa Chalmers, mechalms@umich.edu
School of Information
Current research:

Anoff Cobblah, acobblah@umich.edu
School of Information
Current research:

Danielle Czarnecki, dczar@umich.edu
Department of Sociology
Current research: Reproductive politics in the U.S.,Christianity, infertility, assisted reproductive technologies.

Morgan Daniels, mgdaniel@umich.edu
School of Information
Current research: scientific data sharing and reuse; cyberinfrastructure.

Tara Diener, tddiener@umich.edu
Program in Anthropology and History

Current research: historical ethnography of a maternity hospital in Freetown, Sierra Leone from 1892 to 2012. My research focuses on maternal child health and mortality, nurses and nursing, visuality, practice - clinical and otherwise - and "expert" knowledge.

Kevin Donovan, kevinpd@umich.edu
Program in Anthropology and History
Current research: the conceptualization and use of science and technology by development and humanitarian organizations working in 20th century sub-Saharan Africa. Previous research has explored the role of information technology on the continent, especially mobile phones and biometric identification. See also
http://blurringborders.com.

Kristin Fraser, kwfraser@umich.edu
Department of English
Current research: space and place in modern literature, intersubjectivity and epistemology, relations between scientific discourse and understanding of environment in the early 20th century.

Andrew Haxby, druhaxby@umich.edu
Department of Anthropology

Current research: the loan and legal practices surrounding a housing bubble and bust in the Kathmandu Valley, and the ways by which local households attempt to control their economic futures in states of of extreme risk. Interests include economic anthropology, property, actor-network theory, semiotics, and the anthropology of justice.

**Daniel Hirschman, dandanar@umich.edu
Department of Sociology

Program research: history of macroeconomic statistics, sociology of economics and economists, the emergence of "the economy" as an object of knowledge in the 20th century.
http://danhirschman.com/

Geoffrey Hughes, gfhugh@umich.edu
Department of Anthropology
Current research: the political economy of weddings and marriage in Jordan.  The STSS component focuses on the bureaucratic procedures that render populations visible and manageable through statistics, demography and urban planning.

Adam Fulton Johnson, afjhnsn@umich.edu
Department of Histor
y
Current Research: 19th century anthropology, anthropological training through field experience, theories of "prehistory" and civilization, 19th century justifications for and arguments against settler colonialism, theories of the global and development, global/big/deep history.

Joshua Kupetz, jkupetz@umich.edu
Department of English
Current research: disability theory, specifically the relationship of contemporary American fiction with anatomical discourse, evolutionary theory, prosthetics, and the posthuman.

Brian S. Matzke, bmatzke@umich.edu
Department of English
Current research: American literature, popular culture, and the history of science. I am particularly interested in the construction of expertise in popular fiction. My dissertation, "All Scientific Stuff: Science, Expertise, and Everyday Reality in 1926," was completed in August 2013. It explores the 1920s as a key period in the development of science as a part of everyday reality as expressed in American science fiction, hardboiled detective fiction, and realist novels.

Emily Merchant, eklanche@umich.edu
Department of History

Current research: demographic transition theory as an organizing principle of twentieth-century population studies and politics. Dissertation: "Prediction and Control: Global Population, Population Science, and Population Politics in the Twentieth Century." http://www-personal.umich.edu/~eklanche/

**Wendy L. Michael, wlmich@umich.edu
American Culture
Program research: the Ford Rouge Tour.

Nicole Novak, novakn@umich.edu
Epidemiological Science, SPH
Current research: social epidemiology, stress biomarkers, history of public health.

Davide Orsini, dorsini@umich.edu
Program in Anthropology and History

Current research: Cold War technopolitics, radio-ecology, nuclear risk perceptions, and environmental politics in Western Europe/Italy.

Emma Park, emlopa@umich.edu
Department of History
Current research:

Johnathan Puff, jspuff@umich.edu
School of Architecture
Current research: the impact of 19th century human sciences on the building professions; fire safety in American buildings; uneven access to infrastructure; disproportionate vulnerability to infrastructural failures.

Kate Schnur, krschnu@umich.edu
Department of English
Current research:

Alex Sklyar, asklyar@umich.edu
Department of Anthropology
Current research:

Nicholas Stone, nastone@umich.edu
Engineering
Current research:

Caitlin Townsend, cgtowns@umich.edu
Department of History
Current research: Early modern experimentalism; medicine, especially medical ethics; science as a knowledge system in contrast with religion.


** = Certificate completed.