Afroamerican and African Studies Minor

Effective Fall 2013

A minor in Afroamerican and African Studies is not open to students with a major in the Department of  Afroamerican and African Studies. 

Students wishing to pursue a minor in Afroamerican and African Studies must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the department's designated advisor. Appointments are scheduled at the DAAS Advising Office.

DAAS is an ideal unit for the student interested in a minor in one of the fields concerned with the study of Africa and its Diaspora. Students can use a DAAS minor to supplement and make more coherent their understanding of the knowledge in a traditional discipline. For instance, students concentrating in U.S. history could enhance and deepen their course work by taking a systematic course of study in AAS focusing not only on the many cross-listed courses between AAS and History but also on other non-cross-listed courses that the student might otherwise overlook if not affiliated with DAAS. A course in African politics after colonialism, for example, would work well for such a History concentrator.

Because of the plethora of disciplines, interdisciplinary faculty, and geographic connections designed into the AAS curriculum, a DAAS minor can become a valuable intellectual resource for majors in any field where DAAS has faculty strengths, including history, literature in English, anthropology, political science, sociology, education, psychology, art, and communications. Students in other disciplines, such as languages, could also find an asset in the range of AAS courses. A student of French language and literature would benefit from being able to take a series of courses related to Francophone Africa and the West Indies. Students in fairly regulated majors (such as chemistry) who have an interest in African history and culture would be able to pursue such an interest without jeopardizing the major.

Prerequisites to the Minor: None.

Requirements for the Minor. A minimum of 17 credits. Students interested in pursuing a minor in Afroamerican and African Studies must meet the following requirements:

  1. AAS 111.
  2. One course at the 200 level (3 credits). The following courses best satisfy this requirement:  AAS 200, 201, 202
  3. Two courses at the 300 or 400 level (6 credits). These courses must focus on two of three major geographic areas of the African Diaspora (Africa, the Americas, or the Caribbean) or they may be cross-area courses that focus on at least two geographic areas of the African diaspora.
  4. One senior seminar: AAS 495 (4 credits).

For further information, please contact: daasadvising@umich.edu

Afroamerican and African Studies Minor (Winter 2012-Summer 2013) +

Effective Winter 2012-Summer 2013

A minor in Afroamerican and African Studies is not open to students with a major in the Department of  Afroamerican and African Studies. 

Students wishing to pursue a minor in Afroamerican and African Studies must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the department's designated advisor. Appointments are scheduled at the DAAS Advising Office.

DAAS is an ideal unit for the student interested in a minor in one of the fields concerned with the study of Africa and its Diaspora. Students can use a DAAS minor to supplement and make more coherent their understanding of the knowledge in a traditional discipline. For instance, students concentrating in U.S. history could enhance and deepen their course work by taking a systematic course of study in AAS focusing not only on the many cross-listed courses between AAS and History but also on other non-cross-listed courses that the student might otherwise overlook if not affiliated with DAAS. A course in African politics after colonialism, for example, would work well for such a History concentrator.

Because of the plethora of disciplines, interdisciplinary faculty, and geographic connections designed into the AAS curriculum, a DAAS minor can become a valuable intellectual resource for majors in any field where DAAS has faculty strengths, including history, literature in English, anthropology, political science, sociology, education, psychology, art, and communications. Students in other disciplines, such as languages, could also find an asset in the range of AAS courses. A student of French language and literature would benefit from being able to take a series of courses related to Francophone Africa and the West Indies. Students in fairly regulated majors (such as chemistry) who have an interest in African history and culture would be able to pursue such an interest without jeopardizing the major.

Prerequisites to the Minor: None.

Requirements for the Minor. A minimum of 17 credits. Students interested in pursuing a minor in Afroamerican and African Studies must meet the following requirements:

  1. AAS 111.
  2. One course at the 200 level (3 credits). The following courses best satisfy this requirement:  AAS 200, 201, 202
  3. Two courses at the 300 or 400 level (6 credits). Students need at least two courses at the  300 and 400-level, excluding AAS 495.  One of these courses must be in African Studies and the other must be in either African American or Caribbean Studies.
  4. One senior seminar: AAS 495 (4 credits).

For further information, please contact: daasadvising@umich.edu

Afroamerican and African Studies Minor (Fall 2011) +

Effective Fall 2011 

An academic minor in Afroamerican and African Studies is not open to students with a concentration in the Departmetn of  Afroamerican and African Studies. 

Students wishing to pursue an academic minor in Afroamerican and African Studies must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the department's designated advisor. Appointments are scheduled at the DAAS Advising Office.

CAAS is an ideal unit for the student interested in an academic minor in one of the fields concerned with the study of Africa and its Diaspora. Students can use a DAAS academic minor to supplement and make more coherent their understanding of the knowledge in a traditional discipline. For instance, students concentrating in U.S. history could enhance and deepen their course work by taking a systematic course of study in AAS focusing not only on the many cross-listed courses between AAS and History but also on other non-cross-listed courses that the student might otherwise overlook if not affiliated with DAAS. A course in African politics after colonialism, for example, would work well for such a History concentrator.

Because of the plethora of disciplines, interdisciplinary faculty, and geographic connections designed into the AAS curriculum, a DAAS academic minor can become a valuable intellectual resource for concentrators in any field where DAAS has faculty strengths, including history, literature in English, anthropology, political science, sociology, education, psychology, art, and communications. Students in other disciplines, such as languages, could also find an asset in the range of AAS courses. A student of French language and literature would benefit from being able to take a series of courses related to Francophone Africa and the West Indies. Students in fairly regulated concentrations (such as chemistry) who have an interest in African history and culture would be able to pursue such an interest without jeopardizing the concentration.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor: AAS 111.

Academic Minor Program. A minimum of 17 credits. Students interested in pursuing an academic minor in Afroamerican and African Studies must meet the following requirements:

  1. One course at the 200 level (3 credits). The following courses best satisfy this requirement:  AAS 200, 201, 202
  2. Two courses at the 300 or 400 level (6 credits). These courses may focus on one of three major geographic areas of the African Diaspora (Africa, the Americas, or the Caribbean) or they may be cross-area courses that focus on at least two geographic areas of the African Diaspora.
  3. One senior seminar: AAS 495 (4 credits).

For further information, please contact: caasadvising@umich.edu

Afroamerican and African Studies Academic Minor (through Summer 2011) +

Effective through Summer 2011 

An academic minor in Afroamerican and African Studies is not open to students with a concentration in the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies.

Students wishing to pursue an academic minor in Afroamerican and African Studies must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the Center's designated advisor. Appointments are scheduled at the CAAS Advising Office.

CAAS is an ideal unit for the student interested in an academic minor in one of the fields concerned with the study of Africa and its Diaspora. Students can use a CAAS academic minor to supplement and make more coherent their understanding of the knowledge in a traditional discipline. For instance, students concentrating in U.S. history could enhance and deepen their course work by taking a systematic course of study in CAAS focusing not only on the many cross-listed courses between CAAS and History but also on other non-cross-listed courses that the student might otherwise overlook if not affiliated with CAAS. A course in African politics after colonialism, for example, would work well for such a History concentrator.

Because of the plethora of disciplines, interdisciplinary faculty, and geographic connections designed into the CAAS curriculum, a CAAS academic minor can become a valuable intellectual resource for concentrators in any field where CAAS has faculty strengths, including history, literature in English, anthropology, political science, sociology, education, psychology, art, and communications. Students in other disciplines, such as languages, could also find an asset in the range of CAAS courses. A student of French language and literature would benefit from being able to take a series of courses related to Francophone Africa and the West Indies. Students in fairly regulated concentrations (such as chemistry) who have an interest in African history and culture would be able to pursue such an interest without jeopardizing the concentration.

Academic Minor Program. Students interested in pursuing an academic minor in Afroamerican and African Studies must meet the following requirements:

  1. CAAS 111 (4 credits), to be completed by the sophomore year.

  2. The 200-Level Requirement (3 credits). Students need at least one 200-level course in one of the three areas (African, African American, or Caribbean), or they can select a cross-area course to meet this requirement.

  3. Upper-Level Area Requirements (6 credits). Students need at least two courses at the 300 and 400 level, excluding CAAS 495. One of these courses must be in African Studies and the other must be in either African American or Afro-Caribbean/Latin American Studies.

  4.  CAAS 495, Senior Seminar (4 credits).

    All students are required to take a Senior Seminar. As a capstone course, CAAS 495 invites students to reflect on and synthesize their studies by participating in a seminar format, by working on a particular problem of interest to the student, and through the production of a major research paper.

    CAAS minors are expected to complete a paper of approximately 12 pages as a written requirement for this course.

 


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