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A component of the Program in American Culture, Latina/o Studies is designed to give students an opportunity to develop cultural competence on the diverse groups that comprise the U.S. Latina/o populations, that is, Mexican-Americans or Chicano/as, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Central Americans, and other peoples of Spanish, Indian and African descent. Soon to become the largest minority group in this country, Latinas/os have not only made contributions to U.S. society with their work, values, cultural traditions and linguistic heritage, they have also participated in the making of this country's history. The Latina/o Studies Program offers a variety of courses, some focusing on particular national groups, others based on a particular discipline, and many others organized around specific comparative topics or issues. Examples of courses in Latina/o Studies include: "History of U.S. Latinos," "Latinas in the United States," "American Immigration," "The Politics of Language and Cultural Identity," "Schooling and Community," "Latino Performance Arts," "Latinos in the Media"," "Empowering Latino Families and Communities," "Migrant Bodies," "Hybrid Texts," "Puerto Rican Literatures: The Island and the Mainland," "Cuba and Its Diaspora," and others.

Latina/o Studies Major

Effective Winter 2014; course list update Fall 2014

Prerequisites to the Major

 AMCULT 213 / LATINOAM 213. Introduction to Latino Studies

Requirements for the Major

An interdisciplinary degree, the Latina/o Studies major consists of 27 credits beyond the introductory prerequisite. The objective of this major program is to engage students in a diversity of disciplinary approaches to the study of U.S. Latinas/os as well as to introduce them to the central intellectual questions and topics that have emerged in this field of inquiry. Given the interdisciplinary nature of Latino Studies, students interested in pursuing graduate study in a particular discipline should double concentrate in the respective department in order to have the needed background to enter graduate school. The major consists of:

  1. Latino Studies Major Second Language Proficiency Requirement: Given the importance of second language proficiency to the study of Latina/o populations in the United States, the Latina/o Studies Program requires all majors to satisfy their 4th term proficiency in Spanish, or another relevant language approved by the program advisor.
  2. Students will be required to take one 3 credit course, focusing on Latinos in the U.S.,in each of the following areas (Note: the courses listed below the distribution areas are courses that are regularly offered through Latina/o Studies. Students, however, can use courses not listed here to satisfy distribution area requirements, pending approval from the program advisor).
    • History and Society
      • AMCULT 205 / LATINOAM 205. Latina/o Religions & Cultures
      • AMCULT 315 / LATINOAM 315. History of U.S. Latinos
      • AMCULT 301. Topics in Chicana/o History
      • AMCULT 226 / LATINOAM 226. The Latin Tinge: Latin Music in Social Context in Latin America and the United States
      • AMCULT 304. American Immigration
      • AMCULT 313 / LATINOAM 313. Cuba and its Diaspora

    • Gender and Sexuality
      • AMCULT 243 / LATINOAM 243. Latinas in the United States
      • AMCULT 293. Women of Color
    • Language & the Arts
      • AMCULT 327 / LATINOAM 327. Latino/Latina Literature in the United States
    • Media & Popular Culture
      • AMCULT 381 / LATINOAM 381. Latinas/os and the Media
      • AMCULT 226 / LATINOAM 226. The Latin Tinge: Latin Music in Social Context in Latin America and the United States
      • AMCULT 380 / LATINOAM 380. Studies in Transnational Media
      • AMCULT 420 / LATINOAM 420. Latin American and Latino/a Film Studies
    • Community Service Learning:  
      Community-service learning courses must be in a Latino context. Courses may be chosen from among the following:
      • AMCULT 309
      • AMCULT 388
      • AMCULT 219
      • AMCULT 425
      • SPANISH 428
      • RCCORE 309.006
      • SOC 225 (or 389)
      • PSYCH 401
      • WOMENSTD 425
  3. Electives. Two 300- 400-level courses in Latina/o Studies.

  4. Cognates. Two courses outside the Latina/o Studies Curriculum including advisor-approved courses offered by other departments, one each from the following areas:
    1. Latin American culture, history, literature (may include courses in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures, Anthropology, History, Sociology, Political Science);
    2. Asian Pacific Islander American Studies; African American Studies (may include courses offered through CAAS); Native American Studies; or Arab American Studies.

Honors Plan. (Effective Fall 2010)

 

Latina/o Studies Major (Winter 2011-Fall 2013) +

Effective Winter 2011-Fall 2013

 

Prerequisites to the Major

 AMCULT 213 "Introduction to Latino Studies.

Program of study in a major

An interdisciplinary degree, the Latina/o Studies major consists of 27 credits beyond the introductory prerequisite. The objective of this major program is to engage students in a diversity of disciplinary approaches to the study of U.S. Latinas/os as well as to introduce them to the central intellectual questions and topics that have emerged in this field of inquiry. Given the interdisciplinary nature of Latino Studies, students interested in pursuing graduate study in a particular discipline should double concentrate in the respective department in order to have the needed background to enter graduate school. The major consists of:

  1. Latino Studies Major Second Language Proficiency Requirement: Given the importance of second language proficiency to the study of Latina/o populations in the United States, the Latina/o Studies Program requires all majors to satisfy their 4th term proficiency in Spanish, or another relevant language approved by the program advisor.

  2. Students will be required to take one 3 credit course, focusing on Latinos in the U.S.,in each of the following areas (Note: the courses listed below the distribution areas are courses that are regularly offered through Latina/o Studies. Students, however, can use courses not listed here to satisfy distribution area requirements, pending approval from the program advisor).

    • History and Society

      • AMCULT 205. Latina/o Religions & Cultures
      • AMCULT 315 or 312, History of U.S. Latinos
      • AMCULT 301. Topics in Chicana/o History
      • AMCULT 226. The Latin Tinge: Latin Music in Social Context in Latin America and the United States
      • AMCULT 304. American Immigration
      • AMCULT 313. Cuba and its Diaspora

    • Gender and Sexuality

      • AMCULT 243. Latinas in the United States
      • WOMENSTD 293. Women of Color

    • Language & the Arts

      • AMCULT 327. Latino/Latina Literature in the United States

    • Media & Popular Culture

      • AMCULT 381. Latinas/os and the Media
      • AMCULT 226. The Latin Tinge
      • AMCULT 380. Studies in Transnational Media
      • AMCULT 420. Latin American and Latino/a Film Studies

    • Community Service Learning 

      Community-service learning courses must be in a Latino context. Courses may be chosen from among the following:

      • AMCULT 309
      • AMCULT 388
      • AMCULT 219
      • AMCULT 425
      • SPANISH 428
      • RCCORE 309.006; SOC 389; PSYCH 401; or WOMENSTD 425

  3. Electives. Two 300- 400-level courses in Latina/o Studies.

  4. Cognates. Two courses outside the Latina/o Studies Curriculum including advisor-approved courses offered by other departments, one each from the following areas:

    1. Latin American culture, history, literature (may include courses in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures, Anthropology, History, Sociology, Political Science);
    2. Asian Pacific Islander American Studies; African American Studies (may include courses offered through CAAS); Native American Studies; or Arab American Studies.

Honors Plan. (Effective Fall 2010)

 

Latina/Latino Studies concentration (Fall 2010) +

Latina/o Studies

(Effective Fall 2010)

 

May be elected as an area concentration program

A component of the Program in American Culture, Latina/o Studies is designed to give students an opportunity to develop cultural competence on the diverse groups that comprise the U.S. Latina/o populations, that is, Mexican-Americans or Chicano/as, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Central Americans, and other peoples of Spanish, Indian and African descent. Soon to become the largest minority group in this country, Latinas/os have not only made contributions to U.S. society with their work, values, cultural traditions and linguistic heritage, they have also participated in the making of this country's history. As such, no understanding of the United States can be complete without accounting for the roles Latinos/as played. On the other hand, to understand the diverse Latina/o experiences in the United States, it is essential to have knowledge of the Latin American cultural, social, and political context that has fueled Latina/o migration to the United States. In this sense, the Latina/o Studies Program offers a variety of courses, some focusing on particular national groups, others based on a particular discipline, and many others organized around specific comparative topics or issues. Examples of courses in Latina/o Studies include: "History of U.S. Latinos," "Latinas in the United States," "American Immigration," "The Politics of Language and Cultural Identity," "Schooling and Community," "Latino Performance Arts," "Latinos in the Media"," "Empowering Latino Families and Communities," "Migrant Bodies," "Hybrid Texts," "Puerto Rican Literatures: The Island and the Mainland," "Cuba and Its Diaspora," and others.

Prerequisites to the Concentration. AMCULT 213 "Introduction to Latino Studies" (4 credits) and the Language Requirement (see below).

Concentration Program. An interdisciplinary degree, the Latina/o Studies concentration consists of 30 credits beyond the introductory prerequisite and language requirements. The objective of this concentration program is to engage students in a diversity of disciplinary approaches to the study of U.S. Latinas/os as well as to introduce them to the central intellectual questions and topics that have emerged in this field of inquiry. Given the interdisciplinary nature of Latino Studies, students interested in pursuing graduate study in a particular discipline should double concentrate in the respective department in order to have the needed background to enter graduate school. The concentration consists of:

1. Language Requirement. Latina/o Studies concentrators must prove competency in Spanish. They can do this either by enrolling in SPANISH 290 / AMCULT 224, "Spanish for U.S. Latina/os," (4 credits) or by proving equivalency at the SPANISH 275/276 level; or equivalency in PORTUG 232 or 415. Spanish native speakers who have enrolled in upper-level Spanish courses and complete them successfully may have this requirement waived by passing a proficiency interview and having a waiver form signed.

2. Required Courses:

a. AMCULT 312 or 315, "History of U.S. Latinos"

b. AMCULT 243, "Latinas in the United States".

c. AMCULT 327, "Latino/Latina Literature in the United States"

d. AMCULT 381, "Latinas/os and the Media"

e. One course that focuses on race and racialization in the Americas: AMCULT 399, 498, or 351

f. Three credits of community-service learning in a Latino context. Courses may be chosen from among the following: AMCULT 309, 219, 404, 425; SOC 404, 389; PSYCH 401; or WOMENSTD 425.

3. Electives. Two 300- 400-level courses in Latina/o Studies.

4.Cognates. Two courses outside the Latina/o Studies Curriculum including advisor-approved courses offered by other departments, one each from the following areas:

a. Latin American culture, history, literature (may include courses in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures, Anthropology, History, Sociology, Political Science);

b. Asian Pacific Islander American Studies; African American Studies (may include courses offered through CAAS); Native American Studies; or Arab American Studies

 

Honors Concentration. (Effective Fall 2010)

 

Latina/Latino Studies concentration (Spring 2007-Summer 2010) +

Latina/o Studies

(Effective Spring 2007 through Summer 2010)

May be elected as an area concentration program

A component of the Program in American Culture, Latina/o Studies is designed to give students an opportunity to develop cultural competence on the diverse groups that comprise the U.S. Latina/o populations, that is, Mexican-Americans or Chicano/as, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Central Americans, and other peoples of Spanish, Indian and African descent. Soon to become the largest minority group in this country, Latinas/os have not only made contributions to U.S. society with their work, values, cultural traditions and linguistic heritage, they have also participated in the making of this country's history. As such, no understanding of the United States can be complete without accounting for the roles Latinos/as played. On the other hand, to understand the diverse Latina/o experiences in the United States, it is essential to have knowledge of the Latin American cultural, social, and political context that has fueled Latina/o migration to the United States. In this sense, the Latina/o Studies Pro- gram offers a variety of courses, some focusing on particular national groups, others based on a particular discipline, and many others organized around specific comparative topics or issues. Examples of courses in Latina/o Studies include: "History of U.S. Latinos," "Latinas in the United States," "American Immigration," "The Politics of Language and Cultural Identity," "Schooling and Community," "Latino Performance Arts," "Latinos in the Media"," "Empowering Latino Families and Communities," "Chicano Literature," "Migrant Bodies," "Hybrid Texts," "Puerto Rican Literatures: The Island and the Mainland," "Cuba and Its Diaspora," and others.

Prerequisites to the Concentration. AMCULT 213, "Introduction to Latino Studies".

Concentration Program. An interdisciplinary degree, the Latina/o Studies concentration consists of 33 credits beyond the introductory prerequisites. The objective of this concentration program is to engage students in a diversity of disciplinary approaches to the study of U.S. Latinas/os as well as to introduce them to the central intellectual questions and topics that have emerged in this field of inquiry. Given the interdisciplinary nature of Latino Studies, students interested in pursuing graduate study in a particular discipline should double concentrate in the respective department in order to have the needed background to enter graduate school. The concentration consists of:

  1. Language Requirement. Latina/o Studies concentrators must prove competency in Spanish. They can do this either by enrolling in SPANISH 290 / AMCULT 224, "Spanish for U.S. Latina/os," (4 credits) or by proving equivalency at the SPANISH 275/276 level; or equivalency in PORTUG 232 or 415. Spanish native speakers who have enrolled in upper-level Spanish courses and complete them successfully may have this requirement waived by passing a proficiency interview and having a waiver form signed.
  2. Required Courses:
    1. AMCULT 312 or 315, "History of U.S. Latinos"
    2. AMCULT 243, "Latinas in the United States".
    3. AMCULT 327, "Latino/Latina Literature in the United States"
    4. AMCULT 381, "Latinas/os and the Media"
    5. One course in a Latina/o Studies course that focuses on race and racialization in the Americas: AMCULT 399, 498, or 351
    6. Three credits of community-service learning in a Latino context. Courses may be chosen from among the following: AMCULT 309, 219, 404, 425; SOC 404, 389; PSYCH 401; or WOMENSTD 425.
  3. Electives. Two 300- and 400-level courses in Latina/o Studies, including advisor-approved courses offered by other departments. Latin American culture, history, literature (may include courses taken as cognates through Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures, Anthropology, History, Sociology, Political Science: Asian Pacific Islander American Studies; African American Studies (may include courses offered through CAAS); Native American Studies

Honors Concentration Requirements (effective through Summer 2010)

 

Latina/Latino Studies concentration (effective through Winter 2007) +

Latina/o Studies (effective through Winter 2007)

May be elected as an area concentration program

A component of the Program in American Culture, Latina/o Studies is designed to give students an opportunity to develop cultural competence on the diverse groups that comprise the U.S. Latina/o populations, that is, Mexican-Americans or Chicano/as, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Central Americans, and other peoples of Spanish, Indian and African descent. Soon to become the largest minority group in this country, Latinas/os have not only made contributions to U.S. society with their work, values, cultural traditions and linguistic heritage, they have also participated in the making of this country's history. As such, no understanding of the United States can be complete without accounting for the roles Latinos/as played. On the other hand, to understand the diverse Latina/o experiences in the United States, it is essential to have a knowledge of the Latin American cultural, social, and political context that has fueled Latina/o migration to the United States. In this sense, the Latina/o Studies Program offers a variety of courses, some focusing on particular national groups, others based on a particular discipline, and many others organized around specific comparative topics or issues. Examples of courses in Latina/o Studies include: History of U.S. Latinos, Latinas in the United States, American Immigration, The Politics of Language and Cultural Identity, Women in Prison, Schooling and Community, Latino Performance Arts, Latinos in Film, La Latina, Empowering Latino Families and Communities, Chicano Literature, Migrant Bodies, Hybrid Texts, Puerto Rican Literatures: The Island and the Mainland, Cuba and Its Diaspora, and others.

Prerequisites to the Concentration. Seven credits in American Culture, including AMCULT 212 or 213, "Introduction to Latino Studies" (3 credits).

Concentration Program. An interdisciplinary degree, the Latina/o Studies concentration consists of 30 credits beyond the introductory prerequisites. The objective of this concentration program is to engage students in a diversity of disciplinary approaches to the study of U.S. Latinas/os as well as to introduce them to the central intellectual questions and topics that have emerged in this field of inquiry. Given the interdisciplinary nature of Latino Studies, students interested in pursuing graduate study in a particular discipline should double concentrate in the respective department in order to have the needed background to enter graduate school. The concentration consists of:

  1. Language Requirement. Latina/o Studies concentrators must prove competency in Spanish. They can do this either by enrolling in SPANISH 290 / AMCULT 224, "Spanish for U.S. Latina/os," (4 credits) or by proving equivalency at the SPANISH 275/276 level. Spanish native speakers who have enrolled in upper-level Spanish courses and complete them successfully may have this requirement waived by passing a proficiency interview and having a waiver form signed.

  2. Required Courses:

    1. AMCULT 312, "History of U.S. Latinos"
    2. AMCULT 243, "Latinas in the United States" or three credits on a gender-focused course in Latino Studies.
    3. One course or three credits in a Latina/o Studies course that focuses on race and racialization in the Americas. Courses in other departments may count with the approval of the advisor.
    4. Three credits of community-service learning in a Latino context. Courses may be chosen from among the following: AMCULT 310, "Schooling and Community," SOC 389.018, "Tutoring Latinos," PSYCH 401.001, "Community Practice in Spanish." Appropriate practicum courses offered under AMCULT 309 may also meet this requirement. Students may also complete this requirement through independent studies or through a combination of one-credit units of community service learning attached to specific courses.
  3. Electives and Cognates. One course each in two of the following fields:
    • Latin American culture, history, literature
    • African American Studies
    • Asian American Studies
    • Native American Studies
  4. Additional Electives. The remaining 12 credits can be elected from 300- and 400-level Latina/o Studies courses. Courses focusing on U.S. Latinos offered by other departments may also count toward electives if approved by concentration advisor.

 


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