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Chemistry department undergraduate programs +

The curricula in Chemistry serve those preparing for careers in chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, chemical engineering, pharmacy, and allied fields as well as those seeking a general knowledge of chemistry as part of a liberal arts education. Beyond the first-year courses, there is an emphasis on development of technical knowledge and laboratory experience needed in chemistry and related scientific fields. The undergraduate majors prepare students for work in research and testing laboratories, as well as for business positions in which a chemistry background is desirable. Graduate work is necessary for those planning to do college and university teaching or industrial research.

The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to :

  1. Academic Minors in Biochemistry, Chemical Sciences, Chemical Physics, Polymer Chemistry, and Chemical Measurement Science
  2. a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree (B.S. Chem. degree, 124 credits);
  3. a B.S. Chem. degree with Honors in Chemistry. The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (B.S. Chem.) degree requires a more rigorous and more specialized program of study. The program leading to Honors in chemistry is available to qualified students.
  4. a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Chemical Science (B.S. degree, 120 credits);
  5. a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Chemical Sciences
  6. a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in Biomolecular Science
  7. The department participates in and administers an interdepartmental major Biochemistry.

It is possible to incorporate a teaching certificate into any of these program options.

 

In addition there is a five-year joint degree program with the College of Engineering which leads to a B.S. Chem. and a Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Chemical Engineering).

Information about the program leading to the joint degree with the College of Engineering and general information about teaching certificate requirements are described elsewhere on this website; departmental requirements for these programs are described below.

BS Chemistry degree: This is the most rigorous degree in pure chemistry offered by the department, and should be the degree of choice for students who plan to pursue Ph.D. studies in one of the traditional sub-areas of the field (Organic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, and Analytical Chemistry) or students who plan to seek careers in the Chemical Industry. Students are required to take several lecture and lab courses in all of these core areas, and are also required to complete 4 credits (two semesters) of undergraduate research.

BS Major in Chemical Science: This degree also exposes students to all sub-disciplines in Chemistry, but provides more flexibility in course selection than the BS Chemistry degree. Undergraduate research is an option, but not a requirement for this degree. The BS Major in Chemical Sciences is directed towards students who have interdisciplinary interests and are not planning to either attend a traditional graduate program in chemistry or to find immediate employment as a Chemist. Instead, this degree is geared towards students who plan to attend graduate school in an interdisciplinary field where chemical knowledge will be beneficial, and this should also be an attractive option to students that plan to pursue post-graduate degrees in the Health Sciences.

BS Major in Biochemistry: This degree program is ideal for students who are interested in learning about life from a chemical perspective. Students will gain a solid foundation in chemistry through traditional sub-discipline courses, but will also take a number of chemistry courses that are focused on the role of chemistry in biological systems. Students will also have the option to take elective courses in molecular biology, and also may pursue undergraduate research in lieu of one of the traditional laboratory courses. Students that pursue this degree will be well equipped for graduate studies in biochemistry, chemical biology, and many other fields of inquiry in the life sciences. The degree will also provide excellent preparation for students intending to pursue professional careers in the Biotechnology Industry as well as the Health Sciences.

BS Major in Biomolecular Sciences: The Biomolecular Sciences major is designed to provide students with the core knowledge necessary to understand the chemical principles underpinning biology and the option to explore aspects of the subject of interest to them through a limited set of electives drawn from course offerings in chemistry, biophysics, and molecular, cellular and developmental biology. Biomolecular Sciences is a less extensive major than Biochemistry, and is primarily aimed at those planning a career outside of the chemical sciences. Instead, this should be an attractive degree option for students who plan to pursue post-graduate studies in Biomedical or Health Sciences. Students who are intending to pursue graduate studies or an industrial career in biochemistry or related areas are strongly encouraged to elect the Biochemistry major.

BS Major in Interdisciplinary Chemical Sciences: The Interdisciplinary Chemical Sciences (ICS) major allows students the flexibility to supplement a core study of chemistry with courses in complementary fields. This major can be effective preparation for graduate study in the sciences, graduate studies in an interdisciplinary area that might benefit from a strong science background, for medical, law, and business schools, or for direct entry into the job market. Because students pursuing the ICS degree have a wide variety of career goals, advising from a chemistry departmental advisor is especially important.

 

 

It is strongly recommended that students who are thinking of degrees in chemistry should arrange an appoint with a Chemistry advisory via the online advising system as soon as possible, preferably before the end of the freshman year but certainly before the end of the sophomore year. The online appointment scheduling system can be found here: http://www.umich.edu/~michchem/undergrad/index.html.

Special Departmental Policies. The department requires that a student earn a grade of at least C- in all CHEM courses and mathematics and physics courses which are prerequisite for subsequent elections. A major program grade point average of at least 2.0 is required; this includes chemistry courses, mathematics and physics prerequisites and advanced electives which are part of a plan for the major. Prerequisites must be taken for a grade. Students must request any change in a grade before the end of the next regular academic term.

Teaching Certificate

Those seeking a B.S. or B.S. Chem. degree with a teaching certificate in Chemistry must fulfill departmental as well as School of Education requirements. Students who plan to earn a teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Chemistry should contact the School of Education Teacher Education Office.

 

Chemistry Advising +

Chemistry Advising

Students develop a plan for the major in consultation with a program advisor. Those interested in a B.S. degree with a major in Chemical Science (120 credits) or the specialized program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry (124 credits) are urged to consult a program advisor during the freshman and/or sophomore years. Prospective majors are advised that further study in chemistry requires adequate performance in early chemistry courses (preferably B- or better) as well as in the mathematics and physics prerequisites. Students interested in an Honors degree should see the Chemistry Honors advisor. Appointments are scheduled online at www.lsa.umich.edu/chem/undergraduate/advising. Students interested in the joint program with the College of Engineering should make an appointment with John Stratman [Academic Advising Center, 1255 Angell Hall, 734.764.0332] and then make an appointment to see a chemistry department advisor online.

 

 

May be elected as an interdepartmental major

Effective Date: Fall 2012

Exclusions: Students who elect a major in Biochemistry may not elect the following majors: Biology, General Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; CMB:Biomedical Engineering; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Microbiology; or Neuroscience. They may also not elect a minor in Biology, or any of the Chemistry minors.

The biochemistry major is intended for students interested in the chemical basis of biological phenomena. This degree program is ideal for students who are interested in learning about life from a chemical perspective. The major is intellectually demanding and is intended to prepare students for further education (graduate school or medicine). Students will gain a solid foundation in chemistry through traditional sub-discipline courses, but will also take a number of chemistry courses that are focused on the role of chemistry in biological systems. Students will also have the option to take elective courses in molecular biology, and also may pursue undergraduate research in lieu of one of the traditional laboratory courses. A B.S. degree in biochemistry is also a useful means of preparing for jobs in academic medical centers, the pharmaceutical industry, and in biotechnology companies. Students that pursue this degree will be well equipped for graduate studies in biochemistry, chemical biology, and many other fields of inquiry in the life sciences. The degree will also provide excellent preparation for students intending to pursue professional careers in the Biotechnology Industry as well as the Health Sciences. Because the major is highly structured, it is essential that prospective majors follow the guidelines set forth below.

Prerequisites to the Major

  • BIOLOGY 171 and 172
  • CHEM 210/211, 215
  • MATH 115, 116, 215 (or the equivalent)
  • PHYSICS [135 or 140]/141 and [235 or 240]/241.

In cases where a student is transferring to Biochemistry from outside the University or is entering later, from another major, the student may be awarded an override for Genetics after completion of only one of either BIOLOGY 171 or 172, and where taking the other would be a burden for timely graduation. The override request must come from a Biochemistry department advisor along with the assurance that the student has been informed of the material from BIOLOGY 171 or 172 that he or she needs to review prior to enrolling in the Genetics course.

Program of study in a major

Must include:

  1. Core: BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 260, [302 or 303 or 241 or 245], [216 or 242 (or 246 and 247)] 351*, 352, 451, 452, 453.
         *Students are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 351 but could substitute this course requirement with MCDB 310 or BIOLCHEM 415.
  2. Electives: A total of at least six credits chosen from:
    • CHEM 417/BIOPHYS 417/PHYSICS 417 (3) Dynamic Biophysics
    • CHEM 420 (3) Advanced Organic Chemistry
    • CHEM 440/BIOPHYS 440 (3) Biophysics of Disease
    • CHEM 447 (3) Physical Methods of Analysis
    • CHEM 454 (3) Biophysical Chem II: Macromolecular Structure, Dynamics
    • CHEM 455 (3) Special Topics in Biochemistry
    • CHEM 461 (3) Physical Chemistry I
    • CHEM 467/AOSS 467/EARTH 465/ENSCEN 467/ENVIRON 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • CHEM 521/BIOPHYS 521 (3) Biophysical Chemistry II
    • CHEM 528/BIOLCHEM 528/MEDCHEM 528 (2) Enzyme Mechanisms, Ligand Binding,
    • CHEM 673/BIOLCHEM 673 (2) Enzyme Kinetics
    • AOSS 467/CHEM 467/EARTH 465/ENSCEN 467/ENVIRON 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • BIOLCHEM 528/CHEM 528/MEDCHEM 528 (2) Enzyme Mechanisms, Ligand Binding,
    • BIOLCHEM 530/CHEMBIO 530 (3) Structural Biology
    • BIOLCHEM 541 (3) Molecular Genetics
    • BIOLCHEM 550 (3) Macromolecular Structure and Function
    • BIOLCHEM 576/PHYSIOL 576/PHRMACOL 576 (1) Signal transduction
    • BIOLCHEM 640 (2) Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation
    • BIOLCHEM 650 (3) Mechanisms of Eukaryotic Gene Expression
    • BIOLCHEM 673/CHEM 673 (2) Enzyme Kinetics
    • BIOLCHEM 675/CDB 675/MICRBIOL 675 (2) Advanced Topics in Protein Trafficking and Localization
    • BIOPHYS 417/CHEM 417/PHYSICS 417 (3) Dynamical Processes in Biophysics
    • BIOPHYS 435 (3) Biophysical Modeling
    • BIOPHYS 440/CHEM 440 (3) Biophysics of Disease
    • BIOPHYS 521/CHEM 521 (3) Biophysical Chemistry II
    • CDB 675/BIOLCHEM 675/MICRBIOL 675 (2) Advanced Topics in Protein Trafficking and Localization
    • CHEMBIO 530/BIOLCHEM 530 (3) Structural Biology
    • EARTH 465/CHEM 467/AOSS 467/ ENSCEN 467/ENVIRON 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • ENSCEN 467/CHEM 467/AOSS 467/EARTH 465/ENVIRON 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • ENVIRON 467/CHEM 467/AOSS 467/EARTH 465/ENSCEN 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • MCDB 405 (3) Molecular Basis of Development
    • MCDB 411 (3) Protein Biochemistry)
    • MCDB 417 (3) Chromosome Structure and Function
    • MCDB 418 (3) Endocrinology
    • MCDB 427 (3) Molecular Biology
    • MCDB 428 (3) Cell Biology
    • MCDB 431 (3) Plant Biochemistry
    • MCDB 435 (3) Intracellular Trafficking
    • MCDB 436 (3) Introductory Immunology
    • MCDB 437 (3) Microbial Communities & Development
    • MCDB 441 (3) Cell Biology of Disease
    • MCDB 471 - Advanced Methods in Biochemistry
    • MEDCHEM 528/BIOLCHEM 528/CHEM 528 (2) Enzyme Mechanisms, Ligand Binding,
    • MICRBIOL 675/BIOLCHEM 675/CDB 675 (2) Advanced Topics in Protein Trafficking and Localization
    • PHRMACOL 576/BIOLCHEM 576/PHYSIOL 576 (1) Signal transduction
    • PHYSICS 417CHEM 417/BIOPHYS 417 (3) Dynamic Biophysics
    • PHYSIOL 576/BIOLCHEM 576/PHRMACOL 576 (1) Signal transduction
  3. An advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are MCDB 429,  CHEM 482 or 483; or four credits of undergraduate research elected as any combination of either CHEM 398 or BIOLCHEM 398, by permission of the department advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

Honors Plan

Qualified students may elect an Honors Plan. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.4 and at least a 3.4 in the field of the major, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

 

 

Biochemistry Major (B.S.) (Fall 2012-Fall 2013) +

May be elected as an interdepartmental major

Effective Fall 2012 through Fall 2013

Exclusions: Students who elect a major in Biochemistry may not elect the following majors: Biology, General Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; CMB:Biomedical Engineering; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Microbiology; or Neuroscience. They may also not elect a minor in Biology, or any of the Chemistry minors.

The biochemistry major is intended for students interested in the chemical basis of biological phenomena. This degree program is ideal for students who are interested in learning about life from a chemical perspective. The major is intellectually demanding and is intended to prepare students for further education (graduate school or medicine). Students will gain a solid foundation in chemistry through traditional sub-discipline courses, but will also take a number of chemistry courses that are focused on the role of chemistry in biological systems. Students will also have the option to take elective courses in molecular biology, and also may pursue undergraduate research in lieu of one of the traditional laboratory courses. A B.S. degree in biochemistry is also a useful means of preparing for jobs in academic medical centers, the pharmaceutical industry, and in biotechnology companies. Students that pursue this degree will be well equipped for graduate studies in biochemistry, chemical biology, and many other fields of inquiry in the life sciences. The degree will also provide excellent preparation for students intending to pursue professional careers in the Biotechnology Industry as well as the Health Sciences. Because the major is highly structured, it is essential that prospective majors follow the guidelines set forth below.

Prerequisites to the Major

  • BIOLOGY 171 and 172
  • CHEM 210/211, 215
  • MATH 115, 116, 215 (or the equivalent)
  • PHYSICS [135 or 140]/141 and [235 or 240]/241.

In cases where a student is transferring to Biochemistry from outside the University or is entering later, from another major, the student may be awarded an override for Genetics after completion of only one of either BIOLOGY 171 or 172, and where taking the other would be a burden for timely graduation. The override request must come from a Biochemistry department advisor along with the assurance that the student has been informed of the material from BIOLOGY 171 or 172 that he or she needs to review prior to enrolling in the Genetics course.

Program of study in a major

Must include:

  1. Core: BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 260, [302 or 303 or 241 or 245], [216 or 242 (or 246 and 247)] 351*, 352, 451, 452, 453.
         *Students are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 351 but could substitute this course requirement with MCDB 310 or BIOLCHEM 415.
  2. Electives: A total of at least six credits chosen from:
    • CHEM 417/BIOPHYS 417/PHYSICS 417 (3) Dynamic Biophysics
    • CHEM 420 (3) Advanced Organic Chemistry
    • CHEM 440/BIOPHYS 440 (3) Biophysics of Disease
    • CHEM 447 (3) Physical Methods of Analysis
    • CHEM 454 (3) Biophysical Chem II: Macromolecular Structure, Dynamics
    • CHEM 461 (3) Physical Chemistry I
    • CHEM 467/AOSS 467/EARTH 465/ENSCEN 467/ENVIRON 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • CHEM 521/BIOPHYS 521 (3) Biophysical Chemistry II
    • CHEM 528/BIOLCHEM 528/MEDCHEM 528 (2) Enzyme Mechanisms, Ligand Binding,
    • CHEM 673/BIOLCHEM 673 (2) Enzyme Kinetics
    • AOSS 467/CHEM 467/EARTH 465/ENSCEN 467/ENVIRON 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • BIOLCHEM 528/CHEM 528/MEDCHEM 528 (2) Enzyme Mechanisms, Ligand Binding,
    • BIOLCHEM 530/CHEMBIO 530 (3) Structural Biology
    • BIOLCHEM 541 (3) Molecular Genetics
    • BIOLCHEM 550 (3) Macromolecular Structure and Function
    • BIOLCHEM 576/PHYSIOL 576/PHRMACOL 576 (1) Signal transduction
    • BIOLCHEM 640 (2) Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation
    • BIOLCHEM 650 (3) Mechanisms of Eukaryotic Gene Expression
    • BIOLCHEM 673/CHEM 673 (2) Enzyme Kinetics
    • BIOLCHEM 675/CDB 675/MICRBIOL 675 (2) Advanced Topics in Protein Trafficking and Localization
    • BIOPHYS 417/CHEM 417/PHYSICS 417 (3) Dynamical Processes in Biophysics
    • BIOPHYS 435 (3) Biophysical Modeling
    • BIOPHYS 440/CHEM 440 (3) Biophysics of Disease
    • BIOPHYS 521/CHEM 521 (3) Biophysical Chemistry II
    • CDB 675/BIOLCHEM 675/MICRBIOL 675 (2) Advanced Topics in Protein Trafficking and Localization
    • CHEMBIO 530/BIOLCHEM 530 (3) Structural Biology
    • EARTH 465/CHEM 467/AOSS 467/ ENSCEN 467/ENVIRON 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • ENSCEN 467/CHEM 467/AOSS 467/EARTH 465/ENVIRON 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • ENVIRON 467/CHEM 467/AOSS 467/EARTH 465/ENSCEN 467 (3) Biogeochemical Cycles
    • MCDB 405 (3) Molecular Basis of Development
    • MCDB 411 (3) Protein Biochemistry)
    • MCDB 417 (3) Chromosome Structure and Function
    • MCDB 418 (3) Endocrinology
    • MCDB 427 (3) Molecular Biology
    • MCDB 428 (3) Cell Biology
    • MCDB 431 (3) Plant Biochemistry
    • MCDB 435 (3) Intracellular Trafficking
    • MCDB 436 (3) Introductory Immunology
    • MCDB 437 (3) Microbial Communities & Development
    • MCDB 441 (3) Cell Biology of Disease
    • MCDB 471 - Advanced Methods in Biochemistry
    • MEDCHEM 528/BIOLCHEM 528/CHEM 528 (2) Enzyme Mechanisms, Ligand Binding,
    • MICRBIOL 675/BIOLCHEM 675/CDB 675 (2) Advanced Topics in Protein Trafficking and Localization
    • PHRMACOL 576/BIOLCHEM 576/PHYSIOL 576 (1) Signal transduction
    • PHYSICS 417CHEM 417/BIOPHYS 417 (3) Dynamic Biophysics
    • PHYSIOL 576/BIOLCHEM 576/PHRMACOL 576 (1) Signal transduction
  3. An advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are MCDB 429,  CHEM 482 or 483; or four credits of undergraduate research elected as any combination of either CHEM 398 or BIOLCHEM 398, by permission of the department advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

Honors Plan

Qualified students may elect an Honors major. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.4 and at least a 3.4 in the field of the major, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

 

Teaching Certificate

Those seeking a B.S. or B.S. CHEM. degree with a teaching certificate in Chemistry must fulfill departmental as well as School of Education requirements. Students who plan to earn a teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Chemistry should contact the School of Education Office of Academic Services.  

Biochemistry major (B.S.) (Fall 2011-Summer 2012) +

May be elected as an interdepartmental major

Effective Date: Fall 2011-Summer 2012

Exclusions: Students who elect a major in Biochemistry may not elect the following majors: Biology, General Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; CMB:Biomedical Engineering; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Microbiology; or Neuroscience. They may also not elect a minor in Biology, or any of the Chemistry minors.

The biochemistry major is intended for students interested in the chemical basis of biological phenomena. The major is intellectually demanding and is intended to prepare students for further education (graduate school or medicine). A B.S. degree in biochemistry is also a useful means of preparing for jobs in academic medical centers, the pharmaceutical industry, and in biotechnology companies. Because the major is highly structured, it is essential that prospective majors follow the guidelines set forth below.

Prerequisites to Major:

  • BIOLOGY 171 and 172
  • CHEM 210/211, 215
  • MATH 115, 116, 215 (or the equivalent)
  • PHYSICS [135 or 140]/141 and [235 or 240]/241.

In cases where a student is transferring to Biochemistry from outside the University or is entering later, from another major, the student may be awarded an override for Genetics after completion of only one of either BIOLOGY 171 or 172, and where taking the other would be a burden for timely graduation. The override request must come from a Biochemistry department advisor along with the assurance that the student has been informed of the material from BIOLOGY 171 or 172 that he or she needs to review prior to enrolling in the Genetics course.

Program of study in a major. Must include:

1.   Core: BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 260, [302 or 303 or 241 or 245], [216 or 242 (or 246 and 247)] 351*, 352, 451, 452, 453.

     *Students are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 351 but could substitute this course requirement with MCDB 310 or BIOLCHEM 415.

2.   Electives: A total of at least six credits chosen from:

  • MCDB 417, 427, 428;
  • CHEM 419 or 420, 447, 454, 461, 485/500;
  • MEDCHEM 410;
  • BIOLCHEM 550, 576, 640, 650, 673, 675.

3.   An advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are MCDB 429, CHEM 480;  or four credits of undergraduate research elected as any combination of either CHEM 398 or BIOLCHEM 398, by permission of the department advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

Honors Plan. Qualified students may elect an Honors major. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.4 and at least a 3.4 in the field of the major, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

Advising. Appointments are scheduled online at Chemistry website.

Teaching Certificate. Those seeking a B.S. or B.S. CHEM. degree with a teaching certificate in Chemistry must fulfill departmental as well as School of Education requirements. Students who plan to earn a teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Chemistry should contact the School of Education Office of Academic Services.  

Biochemistry concentration (B.S.) (Fall 2010-Summer 2011) +

May be elected as an interdepartmental concentration program

Effective Date: Fall 2010-Summer 2011 

Exclusions: Students who elect a concentration in Biochemistry may not elect the following concentrations: Biology, General Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; CMB:Biomedical Engineering; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Microbiology; or Neuroscience. They may also not elect an academic minor in Biology, or any of the Chemistry academic minors.

The biochemistry concentration program is intended for students interested in the chemical basis of biological phenomena. The concentration program is intellectually demanding and is intended to prepare students for further education (graduate school or medicine). A B.S. degree in biochemistry is also a useful means of preparing for jobs in academic medical centers, the pharmaceutical industry, and in biotechnology companies. Because the concentration program is highly structured, it is essential that prospective concentrators follow the guidelines set forth below.

Prerequisites to Concentration:

  • BIOLOGY 171 and 172
  • CHEM 210/211, 215
  • MATH 115, 116, 215 (or the equivalent)
  • PHYSICS [135 or 140]/141 and [235 or 240]/241.

In cases where a student is transferring to Biochemistry from outside the University or is entering later, from another concentration, the student may be awarded an override for Genetics after completion of only one of either BIOLOGY 171 or 172, and where taking the other would be a burden for timely graduation. The override request must come from a Biochemistry concentration advisor along with the assurance that the student has been informed of the material from BIOLOGY 171 or 172 that he or she needs to review prior to enrolling in the Genetics course.

Concentration Program. Must include:

1.   Core: BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 260, [241 or 302 or 303], [216 or 242] 351*, 352, 451, 452, 453.

     *Students are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 351 but could substitute this course requirement with MCDB 310 or BIOLCHEM 415.

2.   Electives: A total of at least six credits chosen from:

  • MCDB 417, 427, 428;
  • CHEM 419 or 420, 447, 454, 461, 485/500;
  • MEDCHEM 410;
  • BIOLCHEM 550, 576, 640, 650, 673, 675.

3.   An advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are MCDB 429, CHEM 480; or , or four credits of undergraduate research elected as any combination of either CHEM 398 or BIOLCHEM 398, by permission of the concentration advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

Honors Concentration. Qualified students may elect an Honors concentration. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.4 and at least a 3.4 in the field of concentration, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

Advising. Appointments are scheduled online at Chemistry website.

Teaching Certificate. Those seeking a B.S. or B.S. CHEM. degree with a teaching certificate in Chemistry must fulfill departmental as well as School of Education requirements. Students who plan to earn a teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Chemistry should contact the School of Education Office of Academic Services.  

Biochemistry concentration (B.S.) [Fall 2009 through Summer 2010] +

 

May be elected as an interdepartmental concentration program

Effective Date: Fall 2009 through Summer 2010 

Exclusions: Students who elect a concentration in Biochemistry may not elect the following concentrations: Biology, General Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; CMB:Biomedical Engineering; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Microbiology; or Neuroscience. They may also not elect an academic minor in Biology, or any of the Chemistry academic minors.

The biochemistry concentration program is intended for students interested in the chemical basis of biological phenomena. The concentration program is intellectually demanding and is intended to prepare students for further education (graduate school or medicine). A B.S. degree in biochemistry is also a useful means of preparing for jobs in academic medical centers, the pharmaceutical industry, and in biotechnology companies. Because the concentration program is highly structured, it is essential that prospective concentrators follow the guidelines set forth below.

Prerequisites to Concentration:

  • BIOLOGY 171 and 172
  • CHEM 210/211, 215
  • MATH 115, 116, 215 (or the equivalent)
  • PHYSICS [135 or 140]/141 and [235 or 240]/241.

In cases where a student is transferring to Biochemistry from outside the University or is entering later, from another concentration, the student may be awarded an override for Genetics after completion of only one of either BIOLOGY 171 or 172, and where taking the other would be a burden for timely graduation. The override request must come from a Biochemistry concentration advisor along with the assurance that the student has been informed of the material from BIOLOGY 171 or 172 that he or she needs to review prior to enrolling in the Genetics course.

Concentration Program. Must include:

1.   Core: BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 260, [241 or 302], [216 or 242] 351*, 352, 451, 452, 453.

     *Students are strongly encouraged to take CHEM 351 but could substitute this course requirement with MCDB 310 or BIOLCHEM 415.

2.   Electives: A total of at least six credits chosen from (no substitutions):

  • MCDB 417, 427, 428;
  • CHEM 420, 447, 454, 461, 485/500;
  • MEDCHEM 410;
  • BIOLCHEM 550, 576, 640, 650, 673, 675.

3.   An advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are MCDB 429, CHEM 480, or two terms of CHEM 398 (2 credits each) of an advanced undergraduate research project by permission of the concentration advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

Honors Concentration. Qualified students may elect an Honors concentration. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.4 and at least a 3.4 in the field of concentration, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

Advising. Appointments are scheduled in 1500 Chemistry, (734) 647-2858.

Teaching Certificate. Those seeking a B.S. or B.S. CHEM. degree with a teaching certificate in Chemistry must fulfill departmental as well as School of Education requirements. Students who plan to earn a teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Chemistry should contact the School of Education Office of Academic Services.  

Biochemistry concentration (B.S.) [ Fall 2008-Summer 2009 ] +

May be elected as an interdepartmental concentration program

Effective Date: Fall 2008 through Summer 2009 

Exclusions: Students who elect a concentration in Biochemistry may not elect the following concentrations: Biology, General Biology; Cell and Molecular Biology; CMB:Biomedical Engineering; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Microbiology; or Neuroscience.   They may also not elect an academic minor in Biology, or any of the Chemistry academic minors.

Prerequisites to Concentration: BIOLOGY 162 or [171 and 172], CHEM 210/211, 215/216, MATH 115, 116, 215 (or the equivalent), PHYSICS [135 or 140]/141 and [235 or 240]/241.

In cases where a student is transferring to Biochemistry from outside the University or is entering later, from another concentration, the student may be awarded an override for Genetics after completion of only one of either BIOLOGY 171 or 172, and where taking the other would be a burden for timely graduation. The override request must come from a Biochemistry concentration advisor along with the assurance that the student has been informed of the material from BIOLOGY 171 or 172 that he or she needs to review prior to enrolling in the Genetics course.

Concentration Program. Must include:

  1. Core: BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 241/242, 260, 302, 451, 452, 453, 454.
  2. Electives: One courses chosen from (no substitutions): MCDB 427, 428; CHEM 420, 447, 461, 485/500; MEDCHEM 409, 410.
  3. An advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are BIOLCHEM 416, MCDB 429, CHEM 480, or two terms of CHEM 398 (2 credits each) of an advanced undergraduate research project by permission of the concentration advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

     

     

 

Honors Concentration. Qualified students may elect an Honors concentration. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.4 and at least a 3.4 in the field of concentration, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

 

Biochemistry concentration (B.S.) [Fall 2007 through Summer 2008] +

 

May be elected as an interdepartmental concentration program

Effective Date: Fall 2007 through Summer 2008 

 

Prerequisites to Concentration: BIOLOGY 162 or [171 and 172], CHEM 210/211, 215/216, MATH 115, 116, 215 (or the equivalent), PHYSICS [135 or 140]/141 and [235 or 240]/241.

In cases where a student is transferring to Biochemistry from outside the University or is entering later, from another concentration, the student may be awarded an override for Genetics after completion of only one of either BIOLOGY 171 or 172, and where taking the other would be a burden for timely graduation. The override request must come from a Biochemistry concentration advisor along with the assurance that the student has been informed of the material from BIOLOGY 171 or 172 that he or she needs to review prior to enrolling in the Genetics course.

Concentration Program. Must include:

  1.  

  2. Core: BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 241/242, 260, 302, 451, 452, 453, 454.

     

  3. Electives: One courses chosen from (no substitutions): MCDB 427, 428; CHEM 420, 447, 461, 485/500; MEDCHEM 409, 410.

     

  4. An advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are BIOLCHEM 416, MCDB 429, CHEM 480, or two terms of CHEM 398 (2 credits each) of an advanced undergraduate research project by permission of the concentration advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

     

     

     

Honors Concentration. Qualified students may elect an Honors concentration. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.4 and at least a 3.4 in the field of concentration, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

Advising. Appointments are scheduled in 1500 Chemistry, (734) 647-2858.

Teaching Certificate. Those seeking a B.S. or B.S. Chem. degree with a teaching certificate in Chemistry must fulfill departmental as well as School of Education requirements. Students who plan to earn a teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Chemistry should contact the School of Education Office of Academic Services.

Biochemistry concentration (B.S.) (Fall 2003 through Summer 2007) +

 

May be elected as an interdepartmental concentration program

Effective Date: Fall 2003 through Fall 2007

Prerequisites to Concentration.

  • BIOLOGY 162
  • CHEM 210/211, 215/216

  • MATH 115, 116, 215 (or the equivalent)

  • PHYSICS 140/141 and 240/241.

 

It is recommended that students interested in pursuing graduate work acquire a reading knowledge of French, German, or Russian. The prerequisite work in the basic sciences and in meeting the language requirement should be completed before the junior year.

Concentration Program. Must include:

  1. Core: BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 241/242, 260, 302, 451, 452, 453, 454.

  2. Electives: One courses chosen from (no substitutions): MCDB 427, 428; CHEM 420, 447, 461, 485/500; MEDCHEM 409, 410.

  3. An advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are BIOLCHEM 416, MCDB 429, CHEM 480, or two terms of CHEM 398 (2 credits each) of an advanced undergraduate research project by permission of the concentration advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

     

Honors Concentration. Qualified students may elect an Honors concentration. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.4 and at least a 3.4 in the field of concentration, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

Advising. Appointments are scheduled in 1500 Chemistry, (734) 647-2858.

Teaching Certificate. Those seeking a B.S. or B.S. Chem. degree with a teaching certificate in Chemistry must fulfill departmental as well as School of Education requirements. Students who plan to earn a teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Chemistry should contact the School of Education Office of Academic Services.

Biochemistry concentration (B.S.) [Fall 2002-Summer 2003] +

 

Biochemistry (B.S.)

May be elected as an interdepartmental concentration program

Prerequisites to Concentration. BIOLOGY 162; CHEM 210/211, 215/216; MATH 115, 116, 215, and 216 (or the equivalent); PHYSICS 140/141 and 240/241. It is recommended that students interested in pursuing graduate work acquire a reading knowledge of French, German, or Russian. The prerequisite work in the basic sciences and in meeting the language requirement should be completed before the junior year.

Concentration Program. Must include BIOLOGY 305; CHEM 241/242, 260, 302, 461/462 and 463 or 447; CHEM 451 and 452; and an advanced laboratory or undergraduate research course. Recommended options for the advanced laboratory course are BIOLCHEM 416, MCDB 429, CHEM 480, or two terms (2 credits each) of an advanced undergraduate research project by permission of the concentration advisor. Students electing the undergraduate research option must execute an extended research project under the supervision of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project.

Courses recommended, but not required are: One advanced BIOLCHEM 500-level module, MCDB 427, 428, and CHEM 417. Requirements are flexible enough to accommodate a range of diverse interests in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

Honors Concentration. Qualified students may elect an Honors concentration. This program requires a thesis which describes and analyzes independent experimental work. The research topic and advisor must be approved by the Honors advisor in Biochemistry. Students in this program are expected to maintain an overall grade point average above 3.2 and at least a 3.3 in field of concentration, including prerequisite courses. CHEM 398 (4 credits) and the thesis course, CHEM 498, replaces the requirement for an upper-level laboratory course outlined above.

Advising. Appointments are scheduled in 1500 Chemistry, (734) 647-2857.

Teaching Certificate. Those seeking a B.S. or B.S. Chem. degree with a teaching certificate in Chemistry must fulfill departmental as well as School of Education requirements. Students who plan to earn a teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Chemistry should contact the School of Education Office of Academic Services.


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