Latin Language and Literature Concentration

 Effective Date of Honors change Fall 2005

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

The skills taught in Latin and Greek are useful in many ways. The critical thinking and analytical skills (gleaned from a thorough knowledge of Latin and Greek) will benefit you in any class you take at the university. Students interested in subjects in the sciences and engineering will find the development of these skills invaluable. All students can benefit from improved English skills, particularly those students interested in Communications, Journalism, Law, and all the Humanities. Many students find Latin and Greek so helpful and fascinating that they choose these languages as a concentration or academic minor. Learning Latin and Greek is no more difficult than learning Spanish or French. We teach time-saving language learning strategies and skills in a highly structure format.  As these are ancient languages, we focus primarily only on reading texts. Our department provides free "drop-in" tutoring available to all students in the Elementary Latin and Greek courses. See Ancient Greek Language and Literature and Latin Language and Literature, below.

Prerequisites to Concentration.

LATIN 194 or 232 or special placement examination.

Concentration Program.

Requires a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) including:

  1. Seven courses in LATIN at the 300-level or above; at least 4 of these courses must be at the 400-level or above and must include: (a) LATIN 401 or 402; (b) LATIN 409 or 410; (c) another course from (a) or (b) or another course at the 400-level or above.
  2. Two courses selected from CLARCH 222, CLCIV 102 and 302, or HISTORY 201.

Three credits of Independent Study (LATIN 499) may be used with written approval of the undergraduate advisor.

Honors Concentration.

In addition to the Honors concentration requirements stated above, Honors candidates must take one course, above course level 420, in Latin.

Teaching Certificate (Effective Fall 2012).

Students interested in a secondary school teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Latin must have Professor Deborah Ross approve their program of study.

Teaching Major in Latin.

Thirty credits which must include:

  1. Fifteen credits in LATIN beyond 232, of which 12 must be at the 400-level or above; neither LATIN 499 nor 599 may be counted toward the teaching major without permission of the teaching certificate advisor;
  2. One course in Latin composition;
  3. One course in Classical Archaeology;
  4. One course in Roman history;
  5. One course in Linguistics.

Teaching Minor in Latin.

Twenty credits which must include:

  1. Twelve credits in LATIN beyond LATIN  232, of which 9 must be at the 400-level or above. Neither LATIN 499 nor 599 may be counted toward the teaching minor without permission of the teaching certificate advisor;
  2. One course in Roman history;
  3. One course in Linguistics.

Professor Deborah Ross has the authority to modify departmental requirements for a teaching major or minor in special cases and in keeping with the general requirements for the teaching certificate.


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