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Classical Studies concentrations +

Advising

Students interested in the Department's concentration programs in Ancient Greek, Latin, Classical Languages and Literatures, Classical Archaeology, Classical Civilization, or Modern Greek Studies  should check with the Department office for the name of the current advisor. Students interested in obtaining a Teacher Certification in Latin should see Professor Deborah Ross. The Department recommends that interested students see the undergraduate advisors as early as possible in order to plan their programs and avoid unnecessary scheduling conflicts.

 

Classical Studies Honors concentrations +

Effective Date of Honors concentration requirements Fall 2006

The department offers Honors in each of the six concentrations. Interested students who have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 should contact their concentration advisor to discuss an Honors thesis no later than the winter term of their junior year at the latest.

It is the student's responsibility to find a suitable faculty advisor to oversee the thesis project. This project and its components are to be decided collectively by the student and the advisor at the end of the junior year. We encourage students to think creatively about the approach to their research and thesis project. Thesis advisors must sign off on a student's thesis project proposal.

Honors students may receive six credits during their senior year for research culminating in a thesis project by registering for one of the following courses: CLARCH 495, CLCIV 495, GREEK 495 or LATIN 495 depending on the concentration. At the end of the thesis project, the candidate must offer an oral defense of this work to a committee comprised of the thesis advisor and another faculty member, and present their research findings at the Classical Studies Honors Symposium.

Additional requirements for Honors candidates are specified with each concentration below.

Classical Civilization Concentration

Effective Date of concentration Fall 2012

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Classical Civilization is an exploration of the life and culture of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Students examine almost every aspect of ancient life – art, architecture, social/political problems and events, and the literature of these cultures. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required for this program, but highly recommended.

Prerequisites to Concentration.

A minimum of two courses from the following choices, for a total of 8 credits. One course must emphasize Greek culture and the other course must emphasize Roman culture: 

  • CLCIV 101, 102
  • HISTORY 200, 201
  • GTBOOKS 191

Concentration Program.

Requires a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) for approximately 29 credits including:

  1. at least five upper-level courses (minimum 15 credits) in Classical Civilization at the
    300– or 400–level, with at least two of these at the 400–level. These courses must include at least one course in literature and one course in religion/philosophy. One course in Latin or Ancient Greek may substitute for one of these Classical Civilization courses.
  2. One course (minimum 3 credits) in Classical Archaeology.
  3. One course (minimum 3 credits) in Ancient Greek or Roman history. This requirement is separate from any History course that may have been taken as a prerequisite to the concentration.
  4. In consultation with an advisor, at least one upper-level elective cognate course (minimum 3 credits) outside the division of Classical Civilization. LATIN 231, 232, 295 or GREEK 301, 302, 307, 308  may also count to meet this requirement.
  5. The "Capstone Seminar," either CLCIV 480 or CLCIV 481. Honors candidates may substitute CLCIV 494 and 495 in place of the Capstone Seminar
Honors Concentration.

In addition to the Honors concentration requirements stated above, Honors concentrators must achieve fourth-term language proficiency, as defined by the LSA language requirement, in either ancient Greek or Latin. Students must also take two upper-level cognate courses deemed relevant (at the discretion of the thesis advisor) to the subject of the Honors thesis.

Classical Civilization concentration (Fall 2005-Summer 2012) +

 Effective Date of concentration Fall 2005 through Summer 2012 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Classical Civilization is an exploration of the life and culture of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Students examine almost every aspect of ancient life - art, architecture, social/political problems and events, and the literature of these cultures. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required for this program, but highly recommended.

Prerequisites to Concentration.

A minimum of two courses from the following choices, for a total of 8 credits. One course must emphasize Greek culture and the other course must emphasize Roman culture: 

  • CLCIV 101, 102
  • HISTORY 200, 201
  • GTBOOKS 191

Concentration Program.

Requires a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) for approximately 29 credits including:

  1. at least five upper-level courses (minimum 15 credits) in Classical Civilization at the 300- or 400-level, with at least two of these at the 400-level. These courses must include at least one course in literature and one course in religion/philosophy. One course in Latin or Ancient Greek may substitute for one of these Classical Civilization courses.
  2. One course (minimum 3 credits) in Classical Archaeology.
  3. One course (minimum 3 credits) in Ancient Greek or Roman history. This requirement is separate from any History course that may have been taken as a prerequisite to the concentration.
  4. at least one upper-level elective cognate course (minimum 3 credits) outside the division of Classical Civilization. LATIN 231 or 232 may also count to meet this requirement.
  5. The "Capstone Seminar," either CLCIV 480 or CLCIV 481,

Honors Concentration.

In addition to the Honors concentration requirements stated above, Honors concentrators must achieve fourth-term language proficiency, as defined by the LSA language requirement, in either ancient Greek or Latin. Students are required to take two terms of CLCIV 495 in place of CLCIV 480/481 (Capstone Seminar). Students must also take two upper-level cognate courses deemed relevant (at the discretion of the thesis advisor) to the subject of the Honors thesis.

Classical Civilization concentration (Winter 2001-Summer 2005) +

effective date of concentration Winter 2001-Summer 2005 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Classical Civilization is an exploration of the life and culture of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Students examine almost every aspect of ancient life t art, architecture, social/political problems and events, and the literature of these cultures. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required for this program, but highly recommended.

Prerequisites to Concentration. A minimum of two courses from the following choices, for a total of 8 credits. One course must emphasize Greek culture and the other course must emphasize Roman culture: CLCIV 101, 102, HISTORY 200, 201, GTBOOKS 191.

Concentration Program. Requires a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) for approximately 29 credits including:

  1. at least two introductory or intermediate courses numbered between 200 and 380.
  2. at least five upper-level courses (numbered 380 and above) in the fields of: Classical Civilization, Ancient History, or Classical Archaeology. These five courses must be distributed in at least three of the following subject areas: ancient history, archaeology, religion, or philosophy.
  3. at least one upper-level course in a cognate field (e.g., Anthropology, English Language and Literature, History of Art, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Women's Studies), chosen in consultation with and approved by the concentration advisor.
  4. The "Capstone Seminar," taking either:

    • CLCIV 480, Studying Antiquity
    • CLCIV 481, Classical Tradition.

Classical Civilization concentration (Fall 1999-fall 2000) +

(Fall 1999-fall 2000)

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Prerequisites to Concentration. Classical Civilization 101-102, or an equivalent introductory sequence approved by the Classical Civilization concentration advisor.

Concentration Program. Students must:

  1. complete at least five courses in "classical civilization" chosen in consultation with and approved by the concentration advisor. Up to three courses in Latin and Greek above the level of Greek 102 or Latin 231 can be counted in the concentration.
  2. complete two courses in classical archaeology.
  3. complete the seminar for concentrators, Classical Civilization 480, Studying Antiquity.
  4. complete an upper-level cognate course approved by the concentration advisor in classical studies.

Advising. Prospective concentrators are encouraged to discuss their plans with the concentration advisor.


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