Major: Greek (Modern) Language and Culture


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Classical Studies concentrations +

Advising

Students interested in the Department's concentration programs in Ancient Greek, Latin, Classical Languages and Literatures, Classical Archaeology, Classical Civilization, or Modern Greek Studies  should check with the Department office for the name of the current advisor. Students interested in obtaining a Teacher Certification in Latin should see Professor Deborah Ross. The Department recommends that interested students see the undergraduate advisors as early as possible in order to plan their programs and avoid unnecessary scheduling conflicts.

 

Classical Studies Honors concentrations +

Effective Date of Honors concentration requirements Fall 2006

The department offers Honors in each of the six concentrations. Interested students who have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 should contact their concentration advisor to discuss an Honors thesis no later than the winter term of their junior year at the latest.

It is the student's responsibility to find a suitable faculty advisor to oversee the thesis project. This project and its components are to be decided collectively by the student and the advisor at the end of the junior year. We encourage students to think creatively about the approach to their research and thesis project. Thesis advisors must sign off on a student's thesis project proposal.

Honors students may receive six credits during their senior year for research culminating in a thesis project by registering for one of the following courses: CLARCH 495, CLCIV 495, GREEK 495 or LATIN 495 depending on the concentration. At the end of the thesis project, the candidate must offer an oral defense of this work to a committee comprised of the thesis advisor and another faculty member, and present their research findings at the Classical Studies Honors Symposium.

Additional requirements for Honors candidates are specified with each concentration below.

The field of Modern Greek consists of ... +

The field of Modern Greek consists ofthe study of global Hellenism over the last five centuries, including its intersection with the classical tradition in other cultures. Students pursuing the concentration in Modern Greek Studies study modern Hellenism, with a special emphasis on Greece and the Greek communities of the U.S. They also familiarize themselves with Hellenism's ancient and medieval origins. In addition to acquiring an in-depth knowledge of contemporary Greek language, culture, and history, students gain exposure to a number of disciplines and become aware of distinct methods (literary, historical, anthropological, theoretical/philosophical, etc.) used in the study of civilizations. The concentration requires detailed learning of the language and firm grounding in the knowledge of culture but also offers familiarity with broader issues of our times such as identity, tradition, transnationalism, globalism, and orientalism. Thus the concentration provides a broad-based liberal arts education and contributes to the development of critical thinking and related skills, both linguistic and interpretive. The concentration builds on the great strengths of the Department of Classical Studies and the Program in Comparative Literature, as well as on traditional West European, Balkan, and Mediterranean strengths across the College.

Modern Greek courses cover language, literature, and culture, offering a systematic introduction to the Greek world of the last ten centuries, and especially to its contemporary social reality and intellectual achievement. As part of a broad liberal arts education, they promote the contextual study, both local and global, of contemporary Greek culture, placing particular emphasis on literary studies, critical theory, cultural politics, ethnicity, and diaspora (especially Greek-American). The Modern Greek Studies program offers both a concentration and an academic minor; interested students should contact Professor Vassilios Lambropoulos.  

 

Greek (Modern) Language and Culture Major

May be elected as a departmental major

Effective Winter 2015

The field of Modern Greek consists of the study of global Hellenism over the last five centuries, including its intersection with the classical tradition in other cultures. Students pursuing the major in Modern Greek Studies study modern Hellenism, with a special emphasis on Greece and the Greek communities of the U.S. They also familiarize themselves with Hellenism's ancient and medieval origins. In addition to acquiring an in-depth knowledge of contemporary Greek language, culture, and history, students gain exposure to a number of disciplines and become aware of distinct methods (literary, historical, anthropological, theoretical/philosophical, etc.) used in the study of civilizations. The major requires detailed learning of the language and firm grounding in the knowledge of culture but also offers familiarity with broader issues of our times such as identity, tradition, transnationalism, globalism, and orientalism. Thus the major provides a broad-based liberal arts education and contributes to the development of critical thinking and related skills, both linguistic and interpretive. The major builds on the great strengths of the Department of Classical Studies and the Program in Comparative Literature, as well as on traditional West European, Balkan, and Mediterranean strengths across the College.

Modern Greek courses cover language, literature, and culture, offering a systematic introduction to the Greek world of the last ten centuries, and especially to its contemporary social reality and intellectual achievement. As part of a liberal arts education, they promote the contextual study, both local and global, of contemporary Greek culture, placing particular emphasis on literary studies, critical theory, cultural politics, ethnicity, and diaspora (especially Greek-American). The Modern Greek Studies program offers both a major and a minor; interested students should contact Professor Vassilios Lambropoulos.

Prerequisites to the major

GREEKMOD 101 and 102 (or MODGREEK 101 and 102).

Requirements for the Major

Minimum of ten courses, distributed as follows:

  1. Modern Greek Language:
    Four (4) terms of Modern Greek language at the 200-level and above: GREEKMOD 201, 202, 301, and 302 (or MODGREEK 201, 202, 301, and 302); (205 and 305 are excluded).
  2. Modern Greek Literature and Culture:
    Three courses in Modern Greek literature and culture at the 300-level and above.
  3. Structure courses: three courses, selected in consultation with, and approved by, the department advisor. At least one course must be selected in three of three of the areas listed below:
    1. Classical Civilization
    2. Byzantine History and Art
    3. Anthropology
    4. Political Science

Honors Plan

Students holding a cumulative GPA of 3.5 and Modern Greek Studies Major GPA of 3.5, who have demonstrated superior ability in the language and serious interest in a project of research, may be admitted to a program of advanced study at the beginning of the senior year, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Modern Greek Studies. In addition to the normal requirements for the major, students must complete an Honors Thesis and a reading list in their senior year.

 

Advising

Major advising is provided by Professors Vassilios Lambropoulos and Artemis Leontis. Information about scheduling appointments is available from the department office.

Modern Greek Studies Major (Winter 2010 - Fall 2014) +

Modern Greek Studies

May be elected as a departmental major

Effective Winter 2010 - Fall 2014

The field of Modern Greek consists of the study of global Hellenism over the last five centuries, including its intersection with the classical tradition in other cultures. Students pursuing the major in Modern Greek Studies study modern Hellenism, with a special emphasis on Greece and the Greek communities of the U.S. They also familiarize themselves with Hellenism's ancient and medieval origins. In addition to acquiring an in-depth knowledge of contemporary Greek language, culture, and history, students gain exposure to a number of disciplines and become aware of distinct methods (literary, historical, anthropological, theoretical/philosophical, etc.) used in the study of civilizations. The major requires detailed learning of the language and firm grounding in the knowledge of culture but also offers familiarity with broader issues of our times such as identity, tradition, transnationalism, globalism, and orientalism. Thus the major provides a broad-based liberal arts education and contributes to the development of critical thinking and related skills, both linguistic and interpretive. The major builds on the great strengths of the Department of Classical Studies and the Program in Comparative Literature, as well as on traditional West European, Balkan, and Mediterranean strengths across the College.

Modern Greek courses cover language, literature, and culture, offering a systematic introduction to the Greek world of the last ten centuries, and especially to its contemporary social reality and intellectual achievement. As part of a liberal arts education, they promote the contextual study, both local and global, of contemporary Greek culture, placing particular emphasis on literary studies, critical theory, cultural politics, ethnicity, and diaspora (especially Greek-American). The Modern Greek Studies program offers both a major and a minor; interested students should contact Professor Vassilios Lambropoulos.

Prerequisites to the major

MODGREEK 101 and 102.

Program of study in a major

Minimum of ten courses, distributed as follows:

  1. Modern Greek Language:
    Four (4) terms of Modern Greek language at the 200-level and above:  MODGREEK 201, 202, 301, and 302 (205 and 305 are excluded).
  2. Modern Greek Literature and Culture:
    Three courses in Modern Greek literature and culture at the 300-level and above.
  3. Structure courses: three courses, selected in consultation with, and approved by, the department advisor. At least one course must be selected in three of three of the areas listed below:
    1. Classical Civilization
    2. Byzantine History and Art
    3. Anthropology
    4. Political Science

Honors Plan

Students holding a cumulative GPA of 3.5 and Modern Greek Studies Major GPA of 3.5, who have demonstrated superior ability in the language and serious interest in a project of research, may be admitted to a program of advanced study at the beginning of the senior year, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Modern Greek Studies. In addition to the normal requirements for the major, students must complete an Honors Thesis and a reading list in their senior year.

Study Abroad

Opportunities exist for study abroad in Greece or Cyprus for the summer or an academic term. Students should work closely with the department advisor on both the selection of the foreign schools and the transfer of credit to ensure that their major program will be appropriately enriched.

Advising

Major advising is provided by Professors Vassilios Lambropoulos and Artemis Leontis. Information about scheduling appointments is available from the department office.

Modern Greek Studies concentration (Fall 2003-Fall 2009) +

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Effective Fall 2003 through Fall 2009 

Prerequisites to the concentration.

MODGREEK 101 and 102.

Concentration Program.

Minimum of ten courses, distributed as follows:

  1. Modern Greek Language: Three terms of Modern Greek language courses at the 200-level and above.
  2. Modern Greek Literature and Culture:

    Three courses in Modern Greek literature and culture at the 300-level and above.

  3. Structure courses: Four courses, selected in consultation with, and approved by, the concentration advisor. At least one course must be selected in each of three of the areas listed below:

    1. Classical Civilization
    2. Byzantine History and Art
    3. Anthropology
    4. Political Science

Custom Tag

Honors concentration.

Students holding a cumulative GPA of 3.5 and Modern Greek Studies Concentration GPA of 3.5, who have demonstrated superior ability in the language and serious interest in a project of research, may be admitted to a program of advanced study at the beginning of the senior year, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honors in Modern Greek Studies. In addition to the normal concentration requirements, students must complete an Honors Thesis and a reading list in their senior year.

Study Abroad.

Opportunities exist for study abroad in Greece or Cyprus for the summer or an academic term. Students should work closely with the concentration advisor on both the selection of the foreign schools and the transfer of credit to ensure that their concentration program will be appropriately enriched.

Advising.

Concentration advising is provided by Professors Vassilios Lambropoulos and Artemis Leontis. Information about scheduling appointments is available from the department office.


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