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Offerings of Earth and Environmental SciencesInnovative and flexible majors provide an interesting path for you to follow on your way to an LSA degree. From Camp Davis in Wyoming, to lab work on campus, you have an opportunity to explore the geological sciences in exciting ways...

Our innovative and flexible majors provide an interesting path for students to follow on their way to an LSA degree. From our field camp at Camp Davis in Wyoming, to lab work on campus, Michigan students have an opportunity to explore the geological sciences in exciting ways.

The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences offers:

 

 

Earth and Environmental Sciences Advising and Advance Approval of Elections

A plan for the major in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences is developed in consultation with a department advisor. A proposed plan must be approved in its entirety by the appropriate advisor prior to registration for the first term of major. Thereafter, progress through the plan and future elections must be reviewed, and approved in advance, whenever a change is proposed and in any case no less frequently than at the beginning of each new academic year of residence. Certification must also be obtained from an advisor, on an official LSA Major Release Form, immediately prior to submission of the application for the degree.

Information about appointments with department advisors is available  on the web at: www.lsa.umich.edu/earth/undergraduate/advising

Students wishing to pursue a minor in the department must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the department's designated advisor. Appointments are scheduled online www.lsa.umich.edu/earth/undergraduate/advising

Upper-Level Writing Requirement

The College requires that every student satisfy an upper-level writing requirement before graduation. Students in majors in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences must satisfy this requirement by completion of EARTH 333 or  380 or by a program of writing that is explained in detail on the Earth and Environmental Sciences website:  www.lsa.umich.edu/earth/undergraduate.

 

Teaching Certificate

 The Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences offers prospective secondary school science teachers an opportunity to earn a bachelor's degree from the College with a major in the department while satisfying the requirements for a provisional secondary school teaching certificate with a teaching major in earth science or general science. An outline with specific information about the teaching major and minor in earth science, general science, and the other teaching certificate requirements should be obtained from the School of Education Office of Academic Services. Interested students should consult the teaching certificate advisor as early as possible.

Earth and Environmental Sciences Major

Effective Winter 2014

May be elected as a departmental major

The Earth and Environmental Sciences major trains students to receive a broad foundation in natural and physical sciences related to environmental and Earth sciences. Students are required to learn material from several core areas of the Earth sciences. The program also includes a field requirement that takes students off campus to study and apply their knowledge. Finally, students are encouraged, but not required, to complete a specialization in a subject area of their choosing. Students in this program of study can earn either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. A Bachelor of Science degree requires students complete at least 60 credits in science and math courses.

Prerequisites to the Major

Prerequisites to the major provide students with background knowledge in topics related to Earth and environmental science and in core natural science areas. These should be completed as soon as possible.

  1. Earth and Environmental Science Requirements.
    Choose one from each of the following two categories:
    • Category I: An introductory geoscience course with a laboratory (EARTH 116, 119&118, 120, or 201), or an introductory geosciences course without a laboratory (EARTH 119, 284 or 205+206) combined with a laboratory course (EARTH 118 or 207).
    • Category II: An introductory course in global change, oceanography, or environmental science (EARTH 171, 222&223, 201, 202, 284 or 320).
  2. MATH 115 (Calculus I)
  3. Choose at least 2 out of the following 4 options for chemistry, physics, and biology courses:
    • Option I:  CHEM 130 (General Chemistry) with CHEM 125+126  (lab + discussion) highly recommended
    • Option II: PHYSICS 140 and 141 (Physics I and lab)
    • Option III: BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172 (Introductory Cell Biology or Ecology)
    • Option IV: Choose one from
      • MATH 116 (Calculus II),
      • MATH 214 or 216 (Differential Equations),
      • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or 210/211 (Organic Chemistry and Lab), or
      • PHYSICS 240/241 (Physics II and Lab).

Recommended Prerequisites

Recommended introductory field experience. Students are encouraged in their first year of declaring the major to participate in a departmental international or domestic field trip over spring break or summer.

Students interested in continuing on to graduate school or professional work in the geosciences are encouraged to choose their prerequisites in consultation with a department advisor. See also the other recommendations listed below.

Requirements for the Major

The  requirements for the major are:

  1. Core Courses
    Core courses in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Major are designed to provide students with training in the physical, chemical, and biologic processes relevant to the present form, and evolution of the Earth.

    Students should choose four courses from the following eight Core Course Options:
    • EARTH 305 Earth's Surface and Sediments
    • EARTH 310 Geochemistry of the Solid Earth
    • EARTH 313 Geobiology
    • EARTH 314 Global and Applied Geophysics
    • EARTH 315 Earth Materials
    • EARTH 325 Environmental Geochemistry
    • EARTH 331 Climate and Climate Change
    • EARTH 351 Earth Structure

  2. Field Experience Requirement
    A fundamental aspect of studying the Earth sciences is exposure to hands-on approaches for data collection and problem solving. For this reason, the Earth and Environmental Sciences major requires students to complete a field-based course at Camp Davis, Wyoming, where students learn how to collect and interpret Earth and Environmental science data.

    Students must choose one course from EARTH 450 (or prior to Spring 2014, EARTH 341) or 440. Students interested in completing EARTH 440 are strongly recommended to complete EARTH 305, 310, and 351 prior to taking EARTH 440. Students interested in a career in Oceanography may elect to take, with approval from a department advisor, a marine based field course.

  3. Geoscience Electives
    Nine EARTH credits at the 300 or higher level. Earth and Environmental Sciences majors are required to take these additional EARTH credits at the 300 or higher level to develop additional expertise in a specialization or area of their choosing. Students may wish to consider a specialization in an area listed in the core courses, or create their own specialization in consultation with a department advisor. 

    Remaining core courses listed above may be elected as well as other department course offerings. Students interested in graduate school and/or professional employment in the geosciences are encouraged to take as many 400-level courses as possible.

    A maximum of one credit of research or independent study (EARTH 299, 489, 490, 494, 498, 499) can be used for these electives.  

Sample specializations

Students who choose the Earth and Environmental Sciences major are encouraged to build a specialization that suits their own interests by taking additional upper-level courses in the  department. They may elect to use additional relevant courses from other departments as well. Students should build their specialization in close consultation with their department advisor. 

The following includes titles of a few example specializations that students may consider pursuing. Recommended courses associated with each of these specializations are available on the department website. These are only examples, and other specializations may be considered in consultation with a department advisor.

  • Geology
  • Environmental Geoscience
  • Energy and Mineral Resources
  • Geochemistry
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Paleontology and Geobiology

Other recommendations

Students interested in graduate school or a career in geological and environmental sciences, or oceanography, are strongly encouraged to plan their curriculum in close consultation with a Earth and Environmental Sciences department advisor as soon as possible. Example curricula are given below.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Geological Sciences include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • EARTH 305, 310, 313, 315, 351, 418, 420, 422, 440
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Environmental Geology include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab) or BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172.
  • EARTH 305, 315, 325, 341, 380, 420, 442, 465, 477.
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Oceanography include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), and one of MATH 214, 215, or 216 (Differential equations)
  • STATS 350
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • EARTH 222 and 223, 305, 310, 320, 321, 325 or 422, 409, 420, 449, 452
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Honors in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Earth and Environmental Sciences Major (Winter 2013-Fall 2013) +

Effective Winter 2013-Fall 2013

May be elected as a departmental major

The Earth and Environmental Sciences major trains students to receive a broad foundation in natural and physical sciences related to environmental and Earth sciences. Students are required to learn material from several core areas of the Earth sciences. The program also includes a field requirement that takes students off campus to study and apply their knowledge. Finally, students are encouraged, but not required, to complete a specialization in a subject area of their choosing. Students in this program of study can earn either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. A Bachelor of Science degree requires students complete at least 60 credits in science and math courses.

Prerequisites to the Major

Prerequisites to the major provide students with background knowledge in topics related to Earth and environmental science and in core natural science areas. These should be completed as soon as possible.

  1. Earth and Environmental Science Requirements. Choose one from each of the following two categories:
    • Category I: An introductory geoscience course with a laboratory (EARTH 116, 119&118, 120, or 201), or an introductory geosciences course without a laboratory (EARTH 119, 284 or 205+206) combined with a laboratory course (EARTH 118 or 207).
    • Category II: An introductory course in global change, oceanography, or environmental science (EARTH 171, 222&223, 201, 202, 284 or 320).
  2. MATH 115 (Calculus I)
  3. Choose at least 2 out of the following 4 options for chemistry, physics, and biology courses:
    • Option I: CHEM 130 and 125 (General Chemistry and Lab)
    • Option II: PHYSICS 140 and 141 (Physics I and lab)
    • Option III: BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172 (Introductory Cell Biology or Ecology)
    • Option IV: Choose one from
      • MATH 116 (Calculus II),
      • MATH 214 or 216 (Differential Equations),
      • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or 210/211 (Organic Chemistry and Lab), or
      • PHYSICS 240/241 (Physics II and Lab).

Recommended Prerequisites

Recommended introductory field experience. Students are encouraged in their first year of declaring the major to participate in a departmental international or domestic field trip over spring break or summer.

Students interested in continuing on to graduate school or professional work in the geosciences are encouraged to choose their prerequisites in consultation with a department advisor. See also the other recommendations listed below.

Requirements for the Major

The  requirements for the major are:

  1. Core Courses: Core courses in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Major are designed to provide students with training in the physical, chemical, and biologic processes relevant to the present form, and evolution of the Earth. Students should choose four courses from the following eight Core Course Options:
    • EARTH 305 Earth's Surface and Sediments
    • EARTH 310 Geochemistry of the Solid Earth
    • EARTH 313 Geobiology
    • EARTH 314 Global and Applied Geophysics
    • EARTH 315 Earth Materials
    • EARTH 325 Environmental Geochemistry
    • EARTH 331 Climate and Climate Change
    • EARTH 351 Earth Structure
  2. Field Experience Requirement
    A fundamental aspect of studying the Earth sciences is exposure to hands-on approaches for data collection and problem solving. For this reason, the Earth and Environmental Sciences major requires students to complete a field-based course at Camp Davis, Wyoming, where students learn how to collect and interpret Earth and Environmental science data.

    Students must choose one course from EARTH 341 or 440. Students interested in completing EARTH 440 are strongly recommended to complete EARTH 305, 310, and 351 prior to taking EARTH 440. Students interested in a career in Oceanography may elect to take, with approval from a department advisor, a marine based field course.
  3. Geoscience Electives: Nine EARTH credits at the 300 or higher level. Earth and Environmental Sciences majors are required to take these additional EARTH credits at the 300 or higher level to develop additional expertise in a specialization or area of their choosing. Students may wish to consider a specialization in an area listed in the core courses, or create their own specialization in consultation with a department advisor. 

    Remaining core courses listed above may be elected as well as other department course offerings. Students interested in graduate school and/or professional employment in the geosciences are encouraged to take as many 400-level courses as possible.

    A maximum of one credit of research or independent study (EARTH 299, 489, 490, 494, 498, 499) can be used for these electives.  

Sample specializations: Students who choose the Earth and Environmental Sciences major are encouraged to build a specialization that suits their own interests by taking additional upper-level courses in the  department. They may elect to use additional relevant courses from other departments as well. Students should build their specialization in close consultation with their department advisor. 

The following includes titles of a few example specializations that students may consider pursuing. Recommended courses associated with each of these specializations are available on the department website. These are only examples, and other specializations may be considered in consultation with a department advisor.

  • Geology
  • Environmental Geoscience
  • Energy and Mineral Resources
  • Geochemistry
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Paleontology and Geobiology

Other recommendations: Students interested in graduate school or a career in geological and environmental sciences, or oceanography, are strongly encouraged to plan their curriculum in close consultation with a Earth and Environmental Sciences department advisor as soon as possible. Example curricula are given below.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Geological Sciences include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • EARTH 305, 310, 313, 315, 351, 418, 420, 422, 440
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Environmental Geology include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab) or BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172.
  • EARTH 305, 315, 325, 341, 380, 420, 442, 465, 477.
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Oceanography include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), and one of MATH 214, 215, or 216 (Differential equations)
  • STATS 350
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • EARTH 222 and 223, 305, 310, 320, 321, 325 or 422, 409, 420, 449, 452
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Honors in Geological Sciences

Earth and Environmental Sciences Concentration (Winter 2012-Fall 2012) +

Effective Winter 2012-Fall 2012

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

The Earth and Environmental Sciences concentration trains students to receive a broad foundation in natural and physical sciences related to environmental and Earth sciences. Students are required to learn material from several core areas of the Earth sciences. The program also includes a field requirement that takes students off campus to study and apply their knowledge. Finally, students are encouraged, but not required, to complete a specialization in a subject area of their choosing. Students in this program of study can earn either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. A Bachelor of Science degree requires students complete at least 60 credits in science and math courses.

Prerequisites to Concentration

Prerequisites to the concentration provide students with background knowledge in topics related to Earth and environmental science and in core natural science areas. These should be completed as soon as possible.

  1. Earth and Environmental Science Requirements. Choose one from each of the following two categories:
      • Category I: An introductory geoscience course with a laboratory (EARTH 116, 119&118, 120, or 201), or an introductory geosciences course without a laboratory (EARTH 119, 284 or 205+206) combined with a laboratory course (EARTH 118 or 207).
      • Category II: An introductory course in global change, oceanography, or Earth system science (EARTH 171, 222&223, or 320).
  2. MATH 115 (Calculus I)
  3. Choose at least 2 out of the following 4 options for chemistry, physics, and biology courses:
      • Option I: CHEM 130 and 125 (General Chemistry and Lab)
      • Option II: PHYSICS 140 and 141 (Physics I and lab)
      • Option III: BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172 (Introductory Cell Biology or Ecology)
      • Option IV: Choose one from
        • MATH 116 (Calculus II),
        • MATH 214 or 216 (Differential Equations),
        • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or 210/211 (Organic Chemistry and Lab), or
        • PHYSICS 240/241 (Physics II and Lab).

Recommended Prerequisites

Recommended introductory field experience. Students are encouraged in their first year of declaring the concentration to participate in a departmental international or domestic field trip over spring break or summer.

Students interested in continuing on to graduate school or professional work in the geosciences are encouraged to choose their prerequisites in consultation with a concentration advisor. See also the other recommendations listed below.

Concentration Program

The concentration program requirements are:

  1. Core Courses: Core courses in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Concentration are designed to provide students with training in the physical, chemical, and biologic processes relevant to the present form, and evolution of the Earth. Students should choose four courses from the following eight Core Course Options:
    • EARTH 305 Earth's Surface and Sediments
    • EARTH 310 Geochemistry of the Solid Earth
    • EARTH 313 Geobiology
    • EARTH 314 Global and Applied Geophysics
    • EARTH 315 Earth Materials
    • EARTH 325 Environmental Geochemistry
    • EARTH 331 Climate and Climate Change
    • EARTH 351 Earth Structure
  2. Field Experience Requirement
    A fundamental aspect of studying the Earth sciences is exposure to hands-on approaches for data collection and problem solving. For this reason, the Earth and Environmental Sciences concentration requires students to complete a field-based course at Camp Davis, Wyoming, where students learn how to collect and interpret Earth and Environmental science data.

    Students must choose one course from EARTH 341 or 440. Students interested in completing EARTH 440 are strongly recommended to complete EARTH 305, 310, and 351 prior to taking EARTH 440. Students interested in a career in Oceanography may elect to take, with approval from a concentration advisor, a marine based field course.
  3. Geoscience Electives: Nine EARTH credits at the 300 or higher level. Earth and Environmental Sciences concentrators are required to take these additional EARTH credits at the 300 or higher level to develop additional expertise in a specialization or area of their choosing. Students may wish to consider a specialization in an area listed in the core courses, or create their own specialization in consultation with a concentration advisor. 

    Remaining core courses listed above may be elected as well as other department course offerings. Students interested in graduate school and/or professional employment in the geosciences are encouraged to take as many 400-level courses as possible.

Sample specializations: Students who choose the Earth and Environmental Sciences concentration are encouraged to build a specialization that suits their own interests by taking additional upper-level courses in the  department. They may elect to use additional relevant courses from other departments as well. Students should build their specialization in close consultation with their department advisor. 

The following includes titles of a few example specializations that students may consider pursuing. Recommended courses associated with each of these specializations are available on the department website. These are only examples, and other specializations may be considered in consultation with a concentration advisor.

  • Geology
  • Environmental Geoscience
  • Energy and Mineral Resources
  • Geochemistry
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Paleontology and Geobiology

Other recommendations: Students interested in graduate school or a career in geological and environmental sciences, or oceanography, are strongly encouraged to plan their curriculum in close consultation with a Earth and Environmental Sciences concentration advisor as soon as possible. Example curricula are given below.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Geological Sciences include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • EARTH 305, 310, 313, 315, 351, 418, 420, 422, 440
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Environmental Geology include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab) or BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172.
  • EARTH 305, 315, 325, 341, 380, 420, 442, 465, 477.
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Oceanography include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), and one of MATH 214, 215, or 216 (Differential equations)
  • STATS 350
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • EARTH 222 and 223, 305, 310, 320, 321, 325 or 422, 409, 420, 449, 452
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Honors in Geological Sciences

Earth and Environmental Sciences concentration (Fall 2011) +

Name change effective Fall 2011 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

The Earth and Environmental Sciences Concentration trains students to receive a broad foundation in natural and physical sciences related to environmental and Earth sciences. Students are required to learn material from several core areas of the Earth sciences. The program also includes a field requirement that takes students off campus to study and apply their knowledge. Finally, students are encouraged, but not required, to complete a specialization in a subject area of their choosing. Students in this program of study can earn either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. A Bachelor of Science degree requires students complete at least 60 credits in science and math courses.

Prerequisites to Concentration. Prerequisites to the concentration provide students with background knowledge in topics related to Earth and environmental science and in core natural science areas. These should be completed as soon as possible.

  1. Earth and Environmental Science Requirements. Choose one from each of the following two categories:
      • Category I: An introductory geoscience course with a laboratory (GEOSCI 116, 119&118, 120, or 201), or an introductory geosciences course without a laboratory (GEOSCI 119, 284 or 205+206) combined with a laboratory course (GEOSCI 118 or 207).
      • Category II: An introductory course in global change, oceanography, or Earth system science (GEOSCI 171, 222&223, or 320).
  2. MATH 115 (Calculus I)
  3. Choose at least 2 out of the following 4 options for chemistry, physics, and biology courses:
      • Option I: CHEM 130 and 125 (General Chemistry and Lab)
      • Option II: PHYSICS 140 and 141 (Physics I and lab)
      • Option III: BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172 (Introductory Cell Biology or Ecology)
      • Option IV: Choose one from
        • MATH 116 (Calculus II),
        • MATH 214 or 216 (Differential Equations),
        • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or 210/211 (Organic Chemistry and Lab), or
        • PHYSICS 240/241 (Physics II and Lab).

Recommended Prerequisites:

Recommended introductory field experience. Students are encouraged in their first year of declaring the concentration to participate in a departmental international or domestic field trip over spring break or summer.

Students interested in continuing on to graduate school or professional work in the geosciences are encouraged to choose their prerequisites in consultation with a concentration advisor. See also the other recommendations listed below.

Concentration Program. The concentration program requirements are:

  1. Core Courses: Core courses in the Earth and Environmental Sciences Concentration are designed to provide students with training in the physical, chemical, and biologic processes relevant to the present form, and evolution of the Earth. Students should choose four courses from the following eight Core Course Options:
    • GEOSCI 305 Earth's Surface and Sediments
    • GEOSCI 310 Geochemistry of the Solid Earth
    • GEOSCI 313 Geobiology
    • GEOSCI 314 Global and Applied Geophysics
    • GEOSCI 315 Earth Materials
    • GEOSCI 321 Earth System Dynamics
    • GEOSCI 325 Environmental Geochemistry
    • GEOSCI 351 Earth Structure
  2. Field Experience Requirement

    A fundamental aspect of studying the Earth sciences is exposure to hands-on approaches for data collection and problem solving. For this reason, the Earth and Environmental Sciences concentration requires students to complete a field-based course at Camp Davis, Wyoming, where students learn how to collect and interpret Earth and Environmental science data.

    Students must choose one course from GEOSCI 341 or 440. Students interested in completing GEOSCI 440 are strongly recommended to complete GEOSCI 305, 310, and 351 prior to taking GEOSCI 440. Students interested in a career in Oceanography may elect to take, with approval from a concentration advisor, a marine based field course.

  3. Geoscience Electives: Nine GEOSCI credit hours at the 300 or higher level. Earth and Environmental Sciences concentrators are required to take these additional GEOSCI credit hours at the 300 or higher level to develop additional expertise in a specialization or area of their choosing. Students may wish to consider a specialization in an area listed in the core courses, or create their own specialization in consultation with a concentration advisor. 

    Remaining core courses listed above may be elected as well as other department course offerings. Students interested in graduate school and/or professional employment in the geosciences are encouraged to take as many 400 level courses as possible.

Sample specializations: Students who choose the Earth and Environmental Sciences concentration are encouraged to build a specialization that suits their own interests by taking additional upper level courses in the  department. They may elect to use additional relevant courses from other departments as well. Students should build their specialization in close consultation with their department advisor. 

The following includes titles of a few example specializations that students may consider pursuing. Recommended courses associated with each of these specializations are available on the department website. These are only examples, and other specializations may be considered in consultation with a concentration advisor.

  • Geology
  • Environmental Geoscience
  • Energy and Mineral Resources
  • Geochemistry
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Paleontology and Geobiology

Other recommendations: Students interested in graduate school or a career in geological and environmental sciences, or oceanography, are strongly encouraged to plan their curriculum in close consultation with a Earth and Environmental Sciences concentration advisor as soon as possible. Example curricula are given below.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Geological Sciences include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • GEOSCI 305, 310, 313, 315, 351, 418, 420, 422, 440
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Environmental Geology include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab) or BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172.
  • GEOSCI 305, 315, 325, 341, 380, 420, 442, 465, 477.
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Oceanography include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), and one of MATH 214, 215, or 216 (Differential equations)
  • STATS 350
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • GEOSCI 222 and 223, 305, 310, 320, 321, 325 or 422, 409, 420, 449, 452
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

 

Geological Sciences concentration (Fall 2010-Summer 2011) +

effective Fall 2010-Summer 2011   |  Links to Previous requirements for the concentration are listed at the bottom of this article

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

The Geological Sciences Concentration trains students to receive a broad foundation in natural and physical sciences related to environmental and Earth sciences. Students are required to learn material from several core areas of the Earth sciences. The program also includes a field requirement that takes students off campus to study and apply their knowledge. Finally, students are encouraged, but not required, to complete a specialization in a subject area of their choosing. Students in this program of study can earn either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. A Bachelor of Science degree requires students complete at least 60 credits in science and math courses.

Prerequisites to Concentration. Prerequisites to the concentration provide students with background knowledge in topics related to Earth and environmental science and in core natural science areas. These should be completed as soon as possible.

  1. Earth and Environmental Science Requirements. Choose one from each of the following two categories:
      • Category I: An introductory geoscience course with a laboratory (GEOSCI 116, 119&118, 120, or 201), or an introductory geosciences course without a laboratory (GEOSCI 119, 284 or 205+206) combined with a laboratory course (GEOSCI 118 or 207).
      • Category II: An introductory course in global change, oceanography, or Earth system science (GEOSCI 171, 222&223, or 320).
  2. MATH 115 (Calculus I)
  3. Choose at least 2 out of the following 4 options for chemistry, physics, and biology courses:
      • Option I: CHEM 130 and 125 (General Chemistry and Lab)
      • Option II: PHYSICS 140 and 141 (Physics I and lab)
      • Option III: BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172 (Introductory Cell Biology or Ecology)
      • Option IV: Choose one from
        • MATH 116 (Calculus II),
        • MATH 214 or 216 (Differential Equations),
        • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or 210/211 (Organic Chemistry and Lab), or
        • PHYSICS 240/241 (Physics II and Lab).

Recommended Prerequisites:

Recommended introductory field experience. Students are encouraged in their first year of declaring the concentration to participate in a departmental international or domestic field trip over spring break or summer.

Students interested in continuing on to graduate school or professional work in the geosciences are encouraged to choose their prerequisites in consultation with a concentration advisor. See also the other recommendations listed below.

Concentration Program. The concentration program requirements are:

  1. Core Courses: Core courses in the Geological Sciences Concentration are designed to provide students with training in the physical, chemical, and biologic processes relevant to the present form, and evolution of the Earth. Students should choose four courses from the following eight Core Course Options:
    • GEOSCI 305 Earth's Surface and Sediments
    • GEOSCI 310 Geochemistry of the Solid Earth
    • GEOSCI 313 Geobiology
    • GEOSCI 314 Global and Applied Geophysics
    • GEOSCI 315 Earth Materials
    • GEOSCI 321 Earth System Dynamics
    • GEOSCI 325 Environmental Geochemistry
    • GEOSCI 351 Earth Structure
  2. Field Experience Requirement

    A fundamental aspect of studying the Earth sciences is exposure to hands-on approaches for data collection and problem solving. For this reason, the Geological Sciences concentration requires students to complete a field-based course at Camp Davis, Wyoming, where students learn how to collect and interpret Earth and Environmental science data.

    Students must choose one course from GEOSCI 341 or 440. Students interested in completing GEOSCI 440 are strongly recommended to complete GEOSCI 305, 310, and 351 prior to taking GEOSCI 440. Students interested in a career in Oceanography may elect to take, with approval from a concentration advisor, a marine based field course.

  3. Geoscience Electives: Nine GEOSCI credit hours at the 300 or higher level. Geological Sciences concentrators are required to take these additional GEOSCI credit hours at the 300 or higher level to develop additional expertise in a specialization or area of their choosing. Students may wish to consider a specialization in an area listed in the core courses, or create their own specialization in consultation with a concentration advisor. 

    Remaining core courses listed above may be elected as well as other department course offerings. Students interested in graduate school and/or professional employment in the geosciences are encouraged to take as many 400 level courses as possible.

Sample specializations: Students who choose the Geological Sciences concentration are encouraged to build a specialization that suits their own interests by taking additional upper level courses in the Geological Sciences department. They may elect to use additional relevant courses from other departments as well. Students should build their specialization in close consultation with their department advisor. 

The following includes titles of a few example specializations that students may consider pursuing. Recommended courses associated with each of these specializations are available on the department website. These are only examples, and other specializations may be considered in consultation with a concentration advisor.

  • Geology
  • Environmental Geoscience
  • Energy and Mineral Resources
  • Geochemistry
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Paleontology and Geobiology

Other recommendations: Students interested in graduate school or a career in geological and environmental sciences, or oceanography, are strongly encouraged to plan their curriculum in close consultation with a Geological Sciences concentration advisor as soon as possible. Example curricula are given below.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Geological Sciences include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • GEOSCI 305, 310, 313, 315, 351, 418, 420, 422, 440
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Environmental Geology include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), MATH 214 or 216 (Differential equations).
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab) or BIOLOGY 162, 171, or 172.
  • GEOSCI 305, 315, 325, 341, 380, 420, 442, 465, 477.
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

Recommended courses for students interested in graduate study or professional employment in Oceanography include:

  • MATH 116 (Calculus II), and one of MATH 214, 215, or 216 (Differential equations)
  • STATS 350
  • CHEM 230 (Physical Chemistry) or CHEM 210 and 211 (Organic Chemistry)
  • PHYSICS 240 and 241 (Physics II and Lab)
  • GEOSCI 222 and 223, 305, 310, 320, 321, 325 or 422, 409, 420, 449, 452
  • Completion of a senior or Honors thesis after at least two semesters of research with faculty in the department.

 

Honors in Geological Sciences


 

Previous requirements for discontinued concentrations (last day to declare was April 30, 2010)

Geological Sciences concentration (Fall 2007-Summer 2010) +

effective Fall 2007-Summer 2010

NOTE: this concentration has been discontinued.  The last day to declare a concentration in Earth Sciences was April 30, 2010.   

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

This program of study leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. It is designed to prepare students for graduate study in the geological sciences and for later professional work.

Prerequisites to Concentration. There are five prerequisites, which should be completed as soon as possible:

  1. Introductory geological sciences course with laboratory (GEOSCI 116, 119 & 118, or 120) or an introductory geoscience course without laboratory (GEOSCI 119, 284 or 205+206) combined with a laboratory course (GEOSCI 118 or 207).

  2. One year of introductory chemistry with laboratory, ordinarily two of three from CHEM 125/130, 210/211, and 230.

  3. One year of introductory physics with laboratory, preferably PHYSICS 140/141 and 240/241. Concentrators specializing in paleontology may substitute BIOLOGY 162, 171 or 172 for one term of physics with laboratory.

  4. Two courses in college mathematics, ordinarily MATH 115 and 116.

  5. Elements of Mineralogy (GEOSCI 231).

Concentration Program. The concentration program requirements are:

  1. Core Courses: GEOSCI 305, 310, 351, 440.

  2. Geoscience Electives: Three additional geological sciences, including at least two from GEOSCI 418, 420, and 422. The third can be any 400-level GEOSCI course, except GEOSCI 411.

  3. Required Cognates. In addition concentrators must elect six credits of advanced cognate courses. These must be above the prerequisite level, in chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics, or some combination thereof, and must be approved in advance by the Professional Geology concentration advisor. Students who are certain to specialize in paleontology may, with advance agreement of the advisor, elect an approved statistics course as advanced mathematics. Computing courses are not applicable as advanced cognates.

 

Honors in Geological Sciences



Geological Sciences Concentration (Spring 2000-Summer 2007) +

effective Spring 2000 (formerly the Professional Geology option of the Geological Sciences concentration) through Summer 2007 | 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

This program of study leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. It is designed to prepare students for graduate study in the geological sciences and for later professional work.

Prerequisites to Concentration. There are five prerequisites, which should be completed as soon as possible:

  1. Introductory geological sciences course with laboratory (GEOSCI 116, 117, or 120) or an introductory geoscience course without laboratory (GEOSCI 119, 284 or 205+206) combined with a laboratory course (GEOSCI 118 or 207).

  2. One year of introductory chemistry with laboratory, ordinarily two of three from CHEM 125/130, 210/211, and 230.

  3. One year of introductory physics with laboratory, preferably PHYSICS 140/141 and 240/241. Concentrators specializing in paleontology may substitute BIOLOGY 162 for one term of physics with laboratory.

  4. Two courses in college mathematics, ordinarily MATH 115 and 116.

  5. Elements of Mineralogy (GEOSCI 231).

Concentration Program. The concentration program requirements are:

  1. Core Courses: GEOSCI 305, 310, 351, 440.

  2. Geoscience Electives: Three additional geological sciences, including at least two from GEOSCI 418, 420, and 422. The third can be any 400-level GEOSCI course, except GEOSCI 411.

  3. Required Cognates. In addition concentrators must elect six credits of advanced cognate courses. These must be above the prerequisite level, in chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics, or some combination thereof, and must be approved in advance by the Professional Geology concentration advisor. Students who are certain to specialize in paleontology may, with advance agreement of the advisor, elect an approved statistics course as advanced mathematics. Computing courses are not applicable as advanced cognates.



Honors in Geological Sciences

Geological Sciences concentration (Fall 1999-Winter 2000) +

 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Students have two options in the Geological Sciences concentration: General Geology and Professional Geology

Honors in Geological Sciences

General Geology (Fall 1999-Winter 2000)

This program is designed to provide a broad background in the fundamentals of Earth Science for students who intend to have careers in business, law, medicine, government or other areas.

Prerequisites to Concentration. The prerequisites include: College algebra and trigonometry; a laboratory course in introductory chemistry; and an introductory course with laboratory in geological sciences (G.S. 116, 117, 120, 205+206+207, or 119+118). These should be completed as soon as possible.

Concentration Program. The concentration requires a minimum of 30 credits, including: (1) GS 231; (2) GS 305, 310, or 351; (3) at least 6 credits of approved science cognate courses; (4) 16 additional credits in Geological Science, of which at least 8 are in 300/400-level courses and no more than 3 are in half-term mini courses. Students interested in a professional career in Geological Science should follow the Professional Concentration Program.

Students interested in combining a background in geological sciences with preparation for professional school (e.g., business administration, law school, medical school) should consult an appropriate source for information about requirements for admission to those schools.

Professional Geology (Fall 1999-Winter 2000)

This program of study leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. It is designed to prepare students for graduate study in the geological sciences and for later professional work.

Prerequisites to Concentration. There are five prerequisites, which should be completed as soon as possible:

  1. One introductory geological sciences course with laboratory (G.S. 116, 117, 120) or an introductory geoscience course without laboratory (GS 119, 284, or 205+206) combined with a laboratory course (GS 118 or 207).
  2. One year of introductory chemistry with laboratory, ordinarily two of three from Chemistry 125/130, 210/211, and 230.
  3. One year of introductory physics with laboratory, preferably Physics 140/141 and 240/241. Concentrators specializing in paleontology may substitute Biology 162 for one term of physics with laboratory (ordinarily Physics 140/141).
  4. Two courses in college mathematics, ordinarily Math. 115 and 116.
  5. Elements of Mineralogy (G.S. 231).

Concentration Program. The concentration program requirements are:

  1. Core Courses: G.S. 305, 310, 351, 440.
  2. Geoscience Electives: Three additional geological sciences courses numbered at the 400-level. At least two of these must be elected from Group A but one may be elected from Group B.
    1. Group A: G.S. 418, 420, and 422.
    2. Group B: Any geological sciences courses numbered in the 400 level and from the list entitled "Primarily for Concentrators" except for research, seminar, and field courses. (Research, seminar, and field courses, however, are highly recommended as extra electives.)
  3. In addition concentrators must elect 6 credits of advanced cognate courses. These must be above the prerequisite level, in chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics, or some combination thereof, and must be approved in advance by the Professional Geology concentration advisor. Students who are certain to specialize in paleontology may, with advance agreement of the advisor, elect an approved statistics course as advanced mathematics. Computing courses are not applicable as advanced cognates.


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