English Language and Literature Honors Program

 

effective Fall 2011 

 

 The Honors Program

effective Fall 2011

Joining the English Department's Honors Program means becoming a part of a small, intensely committed group of teachers and students all working toward achieving excellence in the related disciplines of reading, understanding, and writing about texts. Honors courses and the program at large place a premium on discussion, on sustained elaboration of ideas inside and outside the classroom, on conceiving of projects in complex and engaging ways, on learning to do research, and on presenting the fruits of that research in expressive, lucid prose.

Students interested in the Honors Program should apply for admission as soon as possible after the beginning of their sophomore year. Since students generally have not decided to pursue Honors before they have completed the Sophomore prerequisites for the English concentration (ENGLISH 298), almost all applicants for admission to Honors come in the winter term of the sophomore year or the fall term of the junior year. Applications are due at the end of the seventh week of each term. Though the program occasionally accepts a few late applicants (i.e., students applying in the winter term of their junior year), admission is more difficult to achieve if students apply late, and students' chances for success in the program are greatest if, before the first term of your senior year, you have taken at least one theory course (preferably ENGLISH 390 or 490) and begun thinking about a possible focus for their thesis. The application consists of a cover sheet; a transcript; a 500-word statement of purpose; and a writing sample. Students must also be maintaining a 3.5 GPA or better in the concentration.

  • Honors students take a course in literary theory, usually ENGLISH 390 or 490. It is recommended that this be done during the student's junior year.
  • Honors students take two Honors seminars (specified sections of ENGLISH 450 and 451, or ENGLISH 497), preferably in different terms. These courses may also satisfy English program concentration requirements. Enrollment in these courses is limited; classroom discussion, reading, and writing requirements are particularly challenging. These should number among the most exciting and difficult courses you take as an undergraduate. These courses are specially designated in the LS&A Course Guide. Admission to these seminars is by permission of the instructor only; please notify the undergraduate student services assistant in 3187 Angell Hall of your section preference.
  • Honors students write a thesis of approximately sixty pages in length during the senior year - a project that is designed to be the single most important, most meaningful piece of work students undertake as English concentrators at the University. Students write most of their thesis in a required year-long course, "Research and Thesis Writing" (ENGLISH 495/496). Students are guided throughout much of their senior year by a faculty advisor chosen early in that year. The completed thesis is due in mid-March of the senior year.
  • During graduation weekend, Honors students will participate in an Honors Symposium, at which students make brief presentations of their theses to interested faculty, friends, and family.

 

English Language and Literature Honors Program (Fall 2008-Summer 2011) +

 

effective Fall 2008 through Summer 2011 

 

 The Honors Program. Joining the English Department's Honors Program means becoming a part of a small, intensely committed group of teachers and students all working toward achieving excellence in the related disciplines of reading, understanding, and writing about texts. Honors courses and the program at large place a premium on discussion, on sustained elaboration of ideas inside and outside the classroom, on conceiving of projects in complex and engaging ways, on learning to do research, and on presenting the fruits of that research in expressive, lucid prose.

Students interested in the Honors Program should apply for admission as soon as possible after the beginning of their sophomore year. Since students generally have not decided to pursue Honors before they have completed at least one of the Sophomore prerequisites for the English concentration (ENGLISH 297, 298), almost all applicants for admission to Honors come in the winter term of the sophomore year or the fall term of the junior year. Applications are due at the end of the seventh week of each term. Though the program occasionally accepts a few late applicants (i.e., students applying in the winter term of their junior year), admission is more difficult to achieve if students apply late, and students' chances for success in the program are greatest if, before the first term of your senior year, you have taken at least one theory course (preferably ENGLISH 390 or 490) and begun thinking about a possible focus for their thesis. The application consists of a cover sheet; a transcript; a 500-word statement of purpose; and a writing sample. Students must also be maintaining a 3.5 GPA or better in the concentration.

  • Honors students take a course in literary theory, usually ENGLISH 390 or 490. It is recommended that this be done during the student's junior year.
  • Honors students take two Honors seminars (specified sections of ENGLISH 450 and 451, or ENGLISH 497), preferably in different terms. These courses may also satisfy English program concentration requirements. Enrollment in these courses is limited; classroom discussion, reading, and writing requirements are particularly challenging. These should number among the most exciting and difficult courses you take as an undergraduate. These courses are specially designated in the LS&A Course Guide. Admission to these seminars is by permission of the instructor only; please notify the undergraduate student services assistant in 3187 Angell Hall of your section preference.
  • Honors students write a thesis of approximately sixty pages in length during the senior year - a project that is designed to be the single most important, most meaningful piece of work students undertake as English concentrators at the University. Students write most of their thesis in a required year-long course, "Research and Thesis Writing" (ENGLISH 495/496). Students are guided throughout much of their senior year by a faculty advisor chosen early in that year. The completed thesis is due in mid-March of the senior year.
  • During graduation weekend, Honors students will participate in an Honors Symposium, at which students make brief presentations of their theses to interested faculty, friends, and family.

 

 

English Language & Literature Honors Program (through Summer 2008) +

through Summer 2008 course renumberings 

The Honors Program. Joining the English Department's Honors Program means becoming a part of a small, intensely committed group of teachers and students all working toward achieving excellence in the related disciplines of reading, understanding, and writing about texts. Honors courses and the program at large place a premium on discussion, on sustained elaboration of ideas inside and outside the classroom, on conceiving of projects in complex and engaging ways, on learning to do research, and on presenting the fruits of that research in expressive, lucid prose.

Students interested in the Honors Program should apply for admission as soon as possible after the beginning of their sophomore year. Since students generally have not decided to pursue Honors before they have completed at least one of the Sophomore prerequisites for the English concentration (ENGLISH 239, 240), almost all applicants for admission to Honors come in the winter term of the sophomore year or the fall term of the junior year. Applications are due at the end of the seventh week of each term. Though the program occasionally accepts a few late applicants (i.e., students applying in the winter term of their junior year), admission is more difficult to achieve if students apply late, and students' chances for success in the program are greatest if, before the first term of your senior year, you have taken at least one theory course (preferably ENGLISH 484 or 486) and begun thinking about a possible focus for their thesis. The application consists of a cover sheet; a transcript; a 500-word statement of purpose; and a writing sample. Students must also be maintaining a 3.5 GPA or better in the concentration.

  •  Honors students take a course in literary theory, usually ENGLISH 484 or 486. It is recommended that this be done during the student's junior year.
  •  Honors students take two Honors seminars (specified sections of ENGLISH 370 and 371, or ENGLISH 497), preferably in different terms. These courses may also satisfy English program concentration requirements. Enrollment in these courses is limited; classroom discussion, reading, and writing requirements are particularly challenging. These should number among the most exciting and difficult courses you take as an undergraduate. These courses are specially designated in the LS&A Course Guide. Admission to these seminars is by permission of the instructor only; please notify the undergraduate student services assistant in 3187 Angell Hall of your section preference.
  •  Honors students write a thesis of approximately sixty pages in length during the senior year - a project that is designed to be the single most important, most meaningful piece of work students undertake as English concentrators at the University. Students write most of their thesis in a required year-long course, "Research and Thesis Writing" (ENGLISH 492/496). Students are guided throughout much of their senior year by a faculty advisor chosen early in that year. The completed thesis is due in mid-March of the senior year.
  •  During graduation weekend, Honors students will participate in an Honors Symposium, at which students make brief presentations of their theses to interested faculty, friends, and family.


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