Academic Minor: Modern European Studies

Effective Date: Fall 2010 

The minor in Modern European Studies is open to students with any kind of academic background who wish to better understand European societies from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. After gaining a solid knowledge of European history, students can branch out in many directions: they can further explore historical processes, delve into economic problems, investigate social relations, or examine Europe's cultural achievements and conflicts, among other possibilities. The minor encourages a broad understanding of Europe, both geographically and thematically. With the European Union now extending from Portugal to the Russian borderlands, and with global processes reconfiguring Europe's relationships with the rest of the world, the minor offers a unique opportunity for students to familiarize themselves with an enormously diverse continent that is constantly re-examining its roots and discussing its future.

Constraints

Students may not use more than one course to meet the requirements of both a plan for the major and a minor. No course may be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one minor.

Prerequisites to the Minor 

Fourth-term proficiency in a language of the European Union (other than English) or other European language by permission of the advisor.

Requirements for the Minor 

At least 15 credits of courses from the following categories.

  1. Modern European history : HISTORY 318 or 319.
  2. Elective courses : Three courses chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the CES academic advisor, from one of the following tracks:
    1. Politics, Economy, and Society of Europe and the EU
      • One upper-level course on modern European or EU politics, society, or economics.
      • Two additional social science courses on modern Europe.
    2. European Arts and Culture
      • One upper-level course on art, literature, or culture of modern Europe
      • Two additional humanities courses on modern Europe
  3. Capstone : A fourth elective course (3 credits), chosen at the discretion of the student and the advisor and taken during the final two academic terms of study, that offers an opportunity to synthesize what the student has learned about modern Europe. It should involve researching and writing a paper of at least 12 pages in length. Possible themes include EU expansion, colonialism/post-colonialism, economic development, migration and immigration, European identity, and European literary traditions.

At least two courses must be upper-level (300 or above). Courses must be distributed over at least three of the following fields: anthropology, economics, history, history of art, literature, music, philosophy, political science, screen arts and cultures, and sociology

Modern European Studies Academic Minor (Fall 2008-Summer 2010) +

 

Effective Date: Fall 2008 through Summer 2010

 

The academic minor in Modern European Studies is open to students who wish to better understand the recent political, economic, and social transition taking place in Europe from the industrial revolution to the present day and/or gain insight into cultural and artistic developments in Europe during the same period.

After gaining a solid knowledge of European history, students can branch out in many directions: they can further explore historical processes, delve into economic problems, investigate social relations, or examine Europe's cultural achievements and conflicts, among other possibilities. The academic minor encourages a broad understanding of Europe, both geographically and thematically. With the European Union now extending from Portugal to the Russian borderlands, and with global processes reconfiguring Europe's relationships with the rest of the world, the academic minor offers a unique opportunity for students to familiarize themselves with an enormously diverse continent that is constantly re-examining its roots and discussing its future.

Constraints: Students may not use more than one course to meet the requirements of both a concentration plan and an academic minor. No course may be used to satisfy the requirements of more than one academic minor.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor : HISTORY 111 and fourth-term proficiency in a language of the European Union (other than English) or other European language by permission of the advisor.

Academic Minor Program : At least 15 credits of courses from the following categories.

  1. Modern European history : HISTORY 318 or 319.
  2. Elective courses : Three courses chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the CES academic advisor, from one of the following tracks:
    1. Politics and Society of Europe and the EU
      • One upper-level course on modern European or EU politics, society, or economics: POLSCI 358, ECON 453, ANTHRCUL 309.
      • Two additional social science courses on modern Europe.
    2. European Arts and Culture
      • One upper-level course on art, literature, or culture of modern Europe
      • Two additional humanities courses on modern Europe
  3. Capstone : A fourth elective course (3 credits), chosen at the discretion of the student and the advisor and taken during the final two academic terms of study, that offers an opportunity to synthesize what the student has learned about modern Europe. It should involve researching and writing a paper of at least 12 pages in length. Possible themes include EU expansion, colonialism/post-colonialism, economic development, migration and immigration, European identity, and European literary traditions.

At least two courses must be upper-level (300 or above). Courses must be distributed over at least three of the following fields: anthropology, economics, history, history of art, literature, music, philosophy, political science, screen arts and culture, and sociology.

Modern Western European Studies Academic Minor (Fall 2004 through Summer 2008) +

Effective Date: Fall 2004 through Summer 2008

The academic minor in Modern Western European Studies is open to students who wish to better understand the recent political, economic, and social transition taking place in western Europe from the industrial revolution to the present day and/or gain insight into cultural and artistic developments in western Europe during the same period.

Constraints: Not open to those electing a concentration or academic minor in the Department of History . Those electing a concentration or academic minor in the Departments of Classical Studies, English Language and Literature, Germanic Languages and Literatures, or Romance Languages and Literatures and an academic minor in Modern Western European Studies may not count courses in those departments toward the requirements for the Modern Western European Studies academic minor.

 

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor: Fourth-term proficiency in a western European language other than English (Dutch, French, German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Spanish, or Swedish).

Academic Minor Program: At least 18 credits of courses from the following categories, chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the CES academic advisor.

At least two course must be upper-level (300-level or above), and courses must be distributed   over at least three of the following departments and programs: history, political science, economics, anthropology, comparative literature, English language and literature, Germanic languages and literatures, history of art, modern Greek, musicology, philosophy, Residential College, romance languages and literatures, screen arts and cultures, and sociology.

Modern European history sequence: In addition, two courses must be chosen from one grouping, either Group A or Group B:

  1. HISTORY 318 and 319; or

  2. HISTORY 111 and one of the following: GERMAN 171, 322, 401, HISTORY 171, 221, 319, 320, 321, 322, 326, 386, 416

Elective courses: Three courses chosen from one of the following groupings, either Group A, Group B, or Group C. All course in language departments are offered in English.

Each academic term, departments offer a wide variety of courses on modern Western Europe. The following courses may not be offered each term nor does the list include all the courses actually offered. Students are strongly encouraged to talk with the CES advisor to find suitable classes to fit their course of study.

  1. Politics, Society, Economics

  • ANTHRCUL 309

  • ECON 453

  • PHIL 385

  • POLSCI 340, 341, 358; and appropriate sections of 343, 409, and 497

  • RCSSCI 301 (appropriate sections)

  1. Literature and Culture of Western Europe

  • COMPLIT 340; appropriate sections of 350, 410, 495

  • DUTCH 492

  • ENGLISH 461; appropriate sections of 317, 372, 433, 434, 447

  • FRENCH 240, 331, 342

  • GERMAN 350, 382, 432, 457

  • ITALIAN 310, 315, 340, 359

  • MODGREEK 214, 340

  • PHIL 371, 385

  • RCHUMS 340, 385; and appropriate sections of 290, 333, 360, and 389

  • SAC 441 (appropriate sections)

  • SOC 425

Other courses on 19th and 20th century European literature and culture are chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the program advisor.

  1. Art and Culture of Western Europe

  • ARCH 323, 473; appropriate sections of 212

  • ENGLISH 447 (appropriate sections)

  • HISTART 102, 212, 271, 271; appropriate sections of 112, 272

  • MUSICOL 341, 346

  • RCHUMS 385; and appropriate sections of 290, 333, and 389

Other courses on 19th and 20th century European art and culture are chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the program advisor.

Capstone: A fourth elective course (3 credits), chosen at the discretion of the student and the advisor, that offers an opportunity to synthesize what the student has learned about modern western Europe. It may arise from a Directed Reading course in a relevant department. It should involve researching and writing a paper of at least 12 pages in length.


 

Modern Western European Studies (through end of Summer Term, 2004) +

Effective through end of Summer Term, 2004

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor: Fourth-term proficiency in a western European language other than English (Dutch, French, German, Italian, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Spanish, or Swedish).

Academic Minor Program: At least 18 credits of courses from the following categories, chosen in consultation with, and approved by, a CES academic advisor.

At least two courses must be upper-level, and courses must be distributed over three of the following departments and programs: History, Political Science, Economics, Anthropology, Comparative Literature, English Language and Literature, Film and Video Studies, Germanic Languages and Literatures, History of Art, Modern Greek, Musicology, Philosophy, Residential College, Romance Languages and Literatures, and Sociology.

  1. Modern European history sequence. Two courses chosen from one grouping, either Group A or Group B:

    1. HISTORY 318 and 319; or

    2. HISTORY 111 and one of the following: GERMAN 171, HISTORY 171, 319, 320, 321, 386, or 419.



  2. Elective courses: Three courses chosen from one of the following groupings, either Group A, Group B, or Group C:

    1. Politics, Society, Economics

      • ANTHRCUL 309

      • ECON 453

      • PHIL 385

      • POLSCI 341, 363

      • RCSSCI 301 (section subtitled Social Science Theory in Bourgeois Europe)

    2. Literature and Culture of Western Europe

      • COMPLIT 350 (appropriate sections), 410 (appropriate sections), 495 (section subtitled Literature and Anthropology)

      • DUTCH 492

      • ENGLISH 317 (appropriate sections), 372 (appropriate sections), 447 (section subtitled Modern Drama from Ibsen to Brecht)

      • FILMVID 441 (appropriate sections)

      • FRENCH 272, 466

      • GERMAN 382, 403, 404, 457

      • ITALIAN 315, 340

      • MODGREEK 214

      • PHIL 371

      • RCHUMS 340

      • SPANISH 467

      • Other courses concerning 19th/20th-century European literature and culture chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the program advisor

    3. Art and Culture of Western Europe

      • ARCH 212, 323, 473

      • HISTART 102, 212, 271, 272

      • MUSICOL 341, 346

      • RCHUMS 385

      • Other courses concerning 19th/20th-century European art and culture chosen in consultation with, and approved by, the program advisor

  3. Capstone. A fourth elective course (3 credits), chosen at the discretion of the student and the advisor, that offers an opportunity to synthesize what the student has learned about modern western Europe. It may arise from a Directed Reading course in a relevant department. It should involve researching and writing a paper of at least 12 pages in length.

Constraints: Not open to those electing a concentration or academic minor in the Department of History. Those electing a concentration or academic minor in the Departments of Classical Studies, English Language and Literature, Germanic Languages and Literatures, or Romance Languages and Literatures may pursue an academic minor in Modern Western European Studies only if they do not count courses in those departments toward satisfying the requirements for the Modern Western European Studies academic minor.

 


College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI  48109 © 2014 Regents of the University of Michigan