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Effective Fall 2012

May be elected as a departmental major

History is the study of the past and how we remember it. If it happened, historians deal with it-whether it happened yesterday or five thousand years ago. Far too many people imagine that history is merely the dry memorization of names and dates, but a major in history at the University of Michigan will quickly dispel that myth. If you are interested in people and how they interact with the social and natural world, then you should be interested in history. Our courses cover everything: music, politics, family life, technology, war, gender relations, science, medicine, religion, ideologies, sports, and much, much more. Contrary to yet another popular myth, history is one of the most practical, useful majors that one could select. Our students develop skills in critical thinking, writing, and thoughtful reading. Above all, we help students appreciate every aspect of life as part of a much broader and more complicated context, which not only enriches our students' lives but allows them to become sophisticated decision-makers. It is no surprise that employers, law schools, other professional schools, and graduate programs in a wide variety of fields look so favorably upon history graduates.

The history major allows students the flexibility to develop a program that meets their personal interests and needs. Distribution requirements ensure that all students will encounter a wide range of topics, and every student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor to fashion his or her own individualized focus. This combination of breadth, customization, and unparalleled mentoring ensures that the history major can meet the needs of virtually any student.

Prerequisites to the Major 

None.

Requirements for the Major

A major in History requires a total of ten history courses. Five of these courses must be taken in residence at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. At least five of the ten courses must be at the 300-level or above and none can be numbered below 200. Three- and four-credit courses both count as one course. Two mini-courses can be combined in order to equal one course.

  1. Required course. Every history concentrator must take HISTORY 202, “Doing History,” during the first semester after they declare (beginning Fall 2012).  If scheduling problems make it absolutely impossible to take the class immediately, it can be delayed with the approval of a department advisor.  This course will introduce students to historical research and writing by engaging directly with a wide range of primary sources and considering the various ways they can be interpreted. 
  2. The Survey Sequence.  The foundation of the history major is a two-part survey sequence. The Department offers a range of pre-approved sequences in various geographical, chronological, and thematic areas, but students can also develop their own pairings in consultation with a faculty mentor and with the approval of the Department's Director of Undergraduate Studies. A frequently updated list of possible pairings will be available on the History Department website. For a sequence to be approved, the two classes must have a clear and well conceptualized link, and they must fit within a broader theme.
  3. Regional Distribution 
    • Students have to take at least one course in four of the following areas: North America, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East/Central Asia, Africa, Asia, and Transregional/Global.
      Courses taken to satisfy the survey sequence requirement can be used to satisfy the regional distribution requirement.
    • Courses will count in the Transregional/Global category if they cut across significant geographical boundaries (i.e., continents or oceans) as well as major political boundaries. Included are courses dealing with one oceanic basin, but excluded are courses dealing with multiple sites within one continent.
  4. Pre-1800 Distribution. Students must take at least one course that focuses on a period prior to the year 1800. To meet this requirement, at least 75% of the course material must deal with the pre-modern era. This course can also count as one of the regional courses. Courses taken to satisfy the survey sequence requirement cannot be used to satisfy the pre-1800 requirement.
  5. Junior-Senior Colloquium Requirement. One of the ten courses for the major must be a junior-senior history colloquium (HISTORY 396 or HISTORY 397).  Colloquia are offered each semester on a wide range of topics.

A list of pre-approved regional distribution courses and pre-1800 courses will be maintained on the History Department website.

These requirements can overlap. For example, a colloquium about ancient Greece satisfies the pre-1800, European, and colloquium requirements and also counts as one of the upper-level history courses.

For the purposes of history major credit, no more than eight credits may be elected from HISTORY 395 (Independent Study).

Beyond these basic requirements, each student works with an individual faculty mentor to customize his or her program. Prior to declaring a History major, students meet with a general department advisor to discuss the program requirements, but upon declaring, each student selects a faculty mentor who will serve as his or her personal advisor. Department advisors will help students select a mentor based upon each individual's interests and needs. The mentor helps the student pick an appropriate survey sequence and select additional courses that will give coherence to the degree program. What form that coherence will take is up to the student (with the mentor's guidance). Some opt for a geographical focus (the United States, Africa, Europe, etc.), while others might prefer a more thematic approach (women's history, international or transnational history, cultural history, etc.). Still others might want to emphasize global or chronological breadth within a more diversified set of classes.

The Honors Program 

The Junior-Senior Honors Program in the Department of History is open to juniors concentrating in history who have maintained at least a 3.4 grade point average overall and a 3.5 average in history courses. Applications are accepted annually in October. The usual applicant is a first-term junior for the three-term program. Admission decisions will be based on a student's academic performance, background in history, demonstrated ability to write, and recommendations by history faculty. High grade point average alone does not guarantee admission. Accepted students will be notified in November and will begin their participation in the program the following January in HISTORY 398, the Junior Honors Colloquium.

Members of the Honors Program must fulfill all the usual requirements for major in History. The two Honors courses they are required to take, HISTORY 398 (4 credits) and HISTORY 399 (6 credits), count toward the fulfillment of these requirements. Completion of the HISTORY 398-399 Honors sequence also satisfies the "colloquium" requirement for history major, described above.

HISTORY 398, the Junior Honors Colloquium, provides a rigorous introduction to historical research in general and Honors thesis topics and research in particular. During this course students must arrive at a topic and obtain an advisor for their senior Honors thesis. This course also provides intensive training in writing and generally satisfies the ULWR requirement. Students are expected to achieve at least a B+ in this course in order to go on to the Senior Honors Colloquium.

HISTORY 399, the Senior Honors Colloquium, is a faculty-led, year-long writing workshop that includes all seniors writing Honors theses. Although the thesis is written primarily under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students help one another with projects in the workshop by sharing experiences, advice, interests, and, ultimately, portions of their theses. Completed theses, which must be submitted in late March, usually range anywhere from 60 to 100 pages. They are evaluated by the advisor and one or more other faculty, on the basis of the quality of the research, analysis, and writing. The letter grade for HISTORY 399 and the level of Honors with which the student will be graduated (i.e., "Honors," "High Honors," "Highest Honors") are based on the evaluations of the thesis. Theses handed in more than two weeks past the due date are not eligible for an Honors rank.

 

Teaching Certificate

The general requirements for a teaching certificate are described elsewhere in this Bulletin. Students must consult the School of Education Teacher Education office, 1228 School of Education, and check their website (www.soe.umich.edu) for certification program information and general information meeting schedules.

The teaching major and minor for certification differ from the academic history major and minor. History courses required for a teaching certificate with a major in History must include HISTORY 260 and 261, one course in European history, HISTORY 396 or 397, and specific world and non-Western history courses listed on the SOE website. History electives are chosen to reach the minimum 30 credits of History. 

Teaching minor requirements are the same as the teaching major with a minimum of 20 credits of History.

The Eisenberg Institute of Historical Studies

The endowed Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor advances historical research and teaching with powerful new tools for supporting visiting scholars, enriching the intellectual climate for faculty and graduate students, and extending knowledge across campus. Through lectures, workshops and other programs designed to foster scholarly exchange, the Eisenberg Institute promises to transform the teaching and study of history at Michigan. Students are encouraged to attend events sponsored by the Eisenberg Institute, which are listed at www.lsa.umich.edu/eihs.

Student Associations 

The Department sponsors the University of Michigan History Club, which is open to anyone pursuing a major or a minor in history. The Club is managed by a president and a three-person board, all of whom are elected at the beginning of each academic year. The Director of Undergraduate Studies serves as supervisor of the Club, but the initiative for planning events comes from the students (with the assistance of the DUGS and the Undergraduate Program Coordinator) . Two members of the Club are elected to sit on the Department's Undergraduate Committee.

The members of the History Club organize a wide variety of activities for their monthly meetings. For example, they might invite a faculty member to discuss his or her most recent research; they might stage a debate about some historiographical issue or controversy; they might host a special undergraduate event involving one of the Eisenberg Institute's guest scholars. All events will be organized in consultation with the DUGS.

History majors with an average of 3.5 or better in their history courses are encouraged to join the National History Honor Society, Phi Alpha Theta. For more information, go to phialphatheta.org.

The Michigan Journal of History is an undergraduate publication of historical scholarship whose papers and essays come entirely from the University of Michigan student body. The Journal is staffed by students who make all editorial and organizational decisions with the support of the History Department. For more information, visit the Journal on-line at: www.umich.edu/~historyj.

 

History Major (Winter 2012-Summer 2012) +

Effective Winter 2012-Summer 2012

May be elected as a departmental major

History is the study of the past and how we remember it. If it happened, historians deal with it-whether it happened yesterday or five thousand years ago. Far too many people imagine that history is merely the dry memorization of names and dates, but a major in history at the University of Michigan will quickly dispel that myth. If you are interested in people and how they interact with the social and natural world, then you should be interested in history. Our courses cover everything: music, politics, family life, technology, war, gender relations, science, medicine, religion, ideologies, sports, and much, much more. Contrary to yet another popular myth, history is one of the most practical, useful majors that one could select. Our students develop skills in critical thinking, writing, and thoughtful reading. Above all, we help students appreciate every aspect of life as part of a much broader and more complicated context, which not only enriches our students' lives but allows them to become sophisticated decision-makers. It is no surprise that employers, law schools, other professional schools, and graduate programs in a wide variety of fields look so favorably upon history graduates.

The history major allows students the flexibility to develop a program that meets their personal interests and needs. Distribution requirements ensure that all students will encounter a wide range of topics, and every student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor to fashion his or her own individualized focus. This combination of breadth, customization, and unparalleled mentoring ensures that the history major can meet the needs of virtually any student.

Prerequisites to the Major 

None.

Requirements for the Major

A major in History requires a total of ten history courses. Five of these courses must be taken in residence at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. At least five of the ten courses must be at the 300-level or above and none can be numbered below 200. Three- and four-credit courses both count as one course. Two mini-courses can be combined in order to equal one course.

Major Requirements 

  1. The Survey Sequence.  The foundation of the history major is a two-part survey sequence. The Department offers a range of pre-approved sequences in various geographical, chronological, and thematic areas, but students can also develop their own pairings in consultation with a faculty mentor and with the approval of the Department's Director of Undergraduate Studies. A frequently updated list of possible pairings will be available on the History Department website. For a sequence to be approved, the two classes must have a clear and well conceptualized link, and they must fit within a broader theme.
  2. Regional Distribution 
    • Students have to take at least one course in four of the following areas: North America, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East/Central Asia, Africa, Asia, and Transregional/Global.
      Courses taken to satisfy the survey sequence requirement can be used to satisfy the regional distribution requirement.
    • Courses will count in the Transregional/Global category if they cut across significant geographical boundaries (i.e., continents or oceans) as well as major political boundaries. Included are courses dealing with one oceanic basin, but excluded are courses dealing with multiple sites within one continent.
  3. Pre-1800 Distribution. Students must take at least one course that focuses on a period prior to the year 1800. To meet this requirement, at least 75% of the course material must deal with the pre-modern era. This course can also count as one of the regional courses. Courses taken to satisfy the survey sequence requirement cannot be used to satisfy the pre-1800 requirement.
  4. Junior-Senior Colloquium Requirement. One of the ten courses for the major must be a junior-senior history colloquium (HISTORY 396 or HISTORY 397).  Colloquia are offered each semester on a wide range of topics.

A list of pre-approved regional distribution courses and pre-1800 courses will be maintained on the History Department website.

These requirements can overlap. For example, a colloquium about ancient Greece satisfies the pre-1800, European, and colloquium requirements and also counts as one of the upper-level history courses.

For the purposes of history major credit, no more than eight credits may be elected from HISTORY 395 (Independent Study).

Beyond these basic requirements, each student works with an individual faculty mentor to customize his or her program. Prior to declaring a History major, students meet with a general department advisor to discuss the program requirements, but upon declaring, each student selects a faculty mentor who will serve as his or her personal advisor. Department advisors will help students select a mentor based upon each individual's interests and needs. The mentor helps the student pick an appropriate survey sequence and select additional courses that will give coherence to the degree program. What form that coherence will take is up to the student (with the mentor's guidance). Some opt for a geographical focus (the United States, Africa, Europe, etc.), while others might prefer a more thematic approach (women's history, international or transnational history, cultural history, etc.). Still others might want to emphasize global or chronological breadth within a more diversified set of classes.

The Honors Program 

The Junior-Senior Honors Program in the Department of History is open to juniors concentrating in history who have maintained at least a 3.4 grade point average overall and a 3.5 average in history courses. Applications are accepted annually in October. The usual applicant is a first-term junior for the three-term program. Admission decisions will be based on a student's academic performance, background in history, demonstrated ability to write, and recommendations by history faculty. High grade point average alone does not guarantee admission. Accepted students will be notified in November and will begin their participation in the program the following January in HISTORY 398, the Junior Honors Colloquium.

Members of the Honors Program must fulfill all the usual requirements for major in History. The two Honors courses they are required to take, HISTORY 398 (4 credits) and HISTORY 399 (6 credits), count toward the fulfillment of these requirements. Completion of the HISTORY 398-399 Honors sequence also satisfies the "colloquium" requirement for history major, described above.

HISTORY 398, the Junior Honors Colloquium, provides a rigorous introduction to historical research in general and Honors thesis topics and research in particular. During this course students must arrive at a topic and obtain an advisor for their senior Honors thesis. This course also provides intensive training in writing and generally satisfies the ULWR requirement. Students are expected to achieve at least a B+ in this course in order to go on to the Senior Honors Colloquium.

HISTORY 399, the Senior Honors Colloquium, is a faculty-led, year-long writing workshop that includes all seniors writing Honors theses. Although the thesis is written primarily under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students help one another with projects in the workshop by sharing experiences, advice, interests, and, ultimately, portions of their theses. Completed theses, which must be submitted in late March, usually range anywhere from 60 to 100 pages. They are evaluated by the advisor and one or more other faculty, on the basis of the quality of the research, analysis, and writing. The letter grade for HISTORY 399 and the level of Honors with which the student will be graduated (i.e., "Honors," "High Honors," "Highest Honors") are based on the evaluations of the thesis. Theses handed in more than two weeks past the due date are not eligible for an Honors rank.

 

Teaching Certificate

The general requirements for a teaching certificate are described elsewhere in this Bulletin. Students must consult the School of Education Teacher Education office, 1228 School of Education, and check their website (www.soe.umich.edu) for certification program information and general information meeting schedules.

The teaching major and minor for certification differ from the academic history major and minor. History courses required for a teaching certificate with a major in History must include HISTORY 260 and 261, one course in European history, HISTORY 396 or 397, and specific world and non-Western history courses listed on the SOE website. History electives are chosen to reach the minimum 30 credits of History. 

Teaching minor requirements are the same as the teaching major with a minimum of 20 credits of History.

The Eisenberg Institute of Historical Studies

The endowed Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor advances historical research and teaching with powerful new tools for supporting visiting scholars, enriching the intellectual climate for faculty and graduate students, and extending knowledge across campus. Through lectures, workshops and other programs designed to foster scholarly exchange, the Eisenberg Institute promises to transform the teaching and study of history at Michigan. Students are encouraged to attend events sponsored by the Eisenberg Institute, which are listed at www.lsa.umich.edu/eihs.

Student Associations 

The Department sponsors the University of Michigan History Club, which is open to anyone pursuing a major or a minor in history. The Club is managed by a president and a three-person board, all of whom are elected at the beginning of each academic year. The Director of Undergraduate Studies serves as supervisor of the Club, but the initiative for planning events comes from the students (with the assistance of the DUGS and the Undergraduate Program Coordinator) . Two members of the Club are elected to sit on the Department's Undergraduate Committee.

The members of the History Club organize a wide variety of activities for their monthly meetings. For example, they might invite a faculty member to discuss his or her most recent research; they might stage a debate about some historiographical issue or controversy; they might host a special undergraduate event involving one of the Eisenberg Institute's guest scholars. All events will be organized in consultation with the DUGS.

History majors with an average of 3.5 or better in their history courses are encouraged to join the National History Honor Society, Phi Alpha Theta. For more information, go to phialphatheta.org.

The Michigan Journal of History is an undergraduate publication of historical scholarship whose papers and essays come entirely from the University of Michigan student body. The Journal is staffed by students who make all editorial and organizational decisions with the support of the History Department. For more information, visit the Journal on-line at: www.umich.edu/~historyj.

 

History major (Fall 2001-Fall 2011) +

Effective Date of Major: September 5, 2001 through Fall 2011

May be elected as a departmental major

The history major allows students flexibility to chart their own program within the requirements. Students can choose to focus on one aspect of history, electing courses that build on each other, to develop a greater grasp of a particular region or time period. Other students prefer to experience a wide range of history studies and tailor their program to draw on the wide variety of course offerings.

Prerequisites to the Major. One of the six introductory survey sequences: HISTORY 110-111, 200-201, 204-205, 206-207, 246-247, 260-261(160-161). AP credit may not be used to satisfy the prerequisite to major.

 

Requirements for the Major. A Major in History requires eight additional history courses (3 or more credits) beyond the prerequisite, and six cognate credits. Four of the eight HISTORY courses must be taken in residence at the U of M-Ann Arbor. At least five of the eight courses must be elected at the 300-level or above and none can be numbered below 200. Credits from survey sequences that are not used to satisfy the prerequisite requirement may be counted for major if elected at the 200-level or above .

  1. Geographic distribution requires at least one course in U.S. history, one course in European history, and two courses in non-Western history (Africa, Asia, Latin America, Middle East, or Pacific Islands). One of the two non-Western courses may be satisfied by taking an approved course in transregional or comparative history. Prerequisite courses and colloquia may be used to satisfy this requirement.
  2. Chronological distribution requires at least one course that focuses on pre-1800 history. Courses taken to satisfy the prerequisite may not be used to satisfy this requirement.
  3. One of the eight courses for the major must be a junior-senior history colloquium (HISTORY 396 or 397).
  4. Six cognates credits (usually two courses) at the 300-level or above must be taken in one department or program outside the History Department. A course is cognate only if it deepens a student's understanding of history. Students should consult a history department advisor for cognate approval.

Cognates are generally elected in the social sciences or humanities, although courses with historical content in other fields may be acceptable in some cases. Some departments have many courses that are acceptable and some that are not; English literature courses are cognate, but expository and creative writing courses are not. In language departments, courses in the literature or culture of a people are cognate, but courses that train one to speak a language are not.

These requirements can overlap. A colloquium about ancient Greece satisfies the pre-1800, European, and colloquium requirements and also counts as one of the upper-level history courses. Aside from the necessity to satisfy the requirements listed above, there is no single focus or pattern of courses for major. Students develop a plan in consultation with a history department advisor. For the purposes of history major credit, no more than eight credits may be elected from HISTORY 395 (Independent Study).

Honors Plan. The Junior-Senior Honors Program in the Department of History is open to juniors concentrating in history who have maintained at least a 3.4 grade point average overall and a 3.5 average in history courses. Applications are accepted annually in October. The usual applicant is a first-term junior for the three-term program. Admission decisions will be based on a student's academic performance, background in history, demonstrated ability to write, and recommendations by history faculty. High grade point average alone does not guarantee admission. Accepted students will be notified in November and will begin their participation in the program the following January in HISTORY 398, the Junior Honors Colloquium.

Members of the Honors Program must fulfill all the usual requirements for major in History. The two Honors courses they are required to take, HISTORY 398 (4 credits) and HISTORY 399 (6 credits), count toward the fulfillment of these requirements. Completion of the HISTORY 398-399 Honors sequence also satisfies the "colloquium" requirement for history major, described above.

HISTORY 398, the Junior Honors Colloquium, provides a rigorous introduction to historical research in general and Honors thesis topics and research in particular. During this course students must arrive at a topic and obtain an advisor for their senior Honors thesis. This course also provides intensive training in writing and generally satisfies the ULWR requirement. Students are expected to achieve at least a B+ in this course in order to go on to the Senior Honors Colloquium.

HISTORY 398 is offered only in the winter term and is the foundation for work on the senior thesis. Students who cannot fit this course into their schedules will generally not be admitted to the program with exceptions for study abroad. Admitted juniors studying abroad during the winter term will have HISTORY 398 waived, but will be expected to consult with the Honors advisor about finding an advisor and writing a prospectus while they are away. They will also need to complete HISTORY 396 or 397 in its place.

HISTORY 399, the Senior Honors Colloquium, is a year-long writing workshop led by a faculty member which includes all seniors writing Honors theses. Although the thesis is written primarily under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students help one another with projects in the workshop by sharing experiences, advice, interests, and, ultimately, portions of their theses. Completed theses, which must be submitted in late March, usually range anywhere from 60 to 100 pages. They are evaluated by the advisor and one or more other faculty, on the basis of the quality of the research, analysis, and writing. The letter grade for HISTORY 399 and the level of Honors with which the student will be graduated (i.e., "Honors," "High Honors," "Highest Honors") are based on the evaluations of the thesis. Theses handed in more than two weeks past the due date are not eligible for an Honors rank.

Advising. Appointments with History advisors are scheduled online from the department's webpage: www.lsa.umich.edu/history/undergraduate.

Students should see an advisor as soon as they decide on their major or minor

Teaching Certificate. The general requirements for a teaching certificate are described elsewhere in the Bulletin. Students must consult an advisor in the School of Education Office of Student Services, 1033 School of Education, and check their website ( http://www.soe.umich.edu) for certification program information and general information meeting schedules.

The teaching major and minor for certification differ from the academic history major and minor.

History courses required for a teaching certificate with a major in History must include HISTORY 260 or 261, one course in European history, HISTORY 396 or 397, and on specific world and non-Western history courses listed on the SOE website. History electives are chosen to reach the minimum 30 credits of HISTORY.

Teaching minor requirements are the same as the major with a minimum of 20 credits of HISTORY.

Student Association. History majors with an average of 3.5 or better in their history courses are encouraged to join the history honor society, Phi Alpha Theta, a group which fosters an exchange of ideas between students and faculty, and among students, about common historical interests. Two members of the society are elected to sit on the Department's curriculum committee.

History major (Prior to Fall 2001) +

Effective Prior to Fall 2001

May be elected as a departmental major

Prerequisites to the Major. One of the five introductory survey sequences: History 110-111, 121-122, 151-152, 160-161, or 200-201.

Requirements for the major. Major in history requires eight 3- or 4-credit courses, at least four of which must be taken in residence at the UM-Ann Arbor. At least five of the eight courses in history must be elected at the 300-level or above. Credits earned from survey sequence courses taken as a prerequisite to major may not be included in a major program, but credits earned from survey sequence courses not used to satisfy the prerequisite requirement may be counted for major. The major must include at least one junior-senior colloquium (History 396 or 397). In addition, majors must elect at least one course in American history, at least one course in European history from ancient to modern times, and at least one course in non-Western or Latin American history. Students should consult a department advisor on whether a course satisfies this area requirement. Courses taken to satisfy the prerequisite requirement or the colloquium requirement may also be used to satisfy this area requirement. Finally, majors must elect six credits of cognate courses. Cognate courses are usually elected in the social sciences or the humanities; the cognate credits must be earned in a single department and must be from upper-level courses. In most cognate departments there are some courses which do not satisfy the history cognate requirement; a course is cognate to history only if it deepens the student's understanding of history. Thus, for instance, in the English department, literature courses are cognate but creative or expository writing courses are not, and in the language departments, courses in the literature or culture of a people are cognate but courses which offer training in how to speak the language are not. Students should consult with a department advisor to be certain whether or not a given course is acceptable to the History Department.

Aside from the necessity to satisfy the requirements listed above, the department specifies no single pattern of courses for major. Students develop a plan for the major in consultation with their advisor. Generally, such plans focus upon geographic areas (e.g., American or French history), methodological themes (e.g., demography), or topical developments (e.g., industrialization).

For purposes of history major credit, no more than 12 credits may be elected from History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399.

Honors Plan. The Junior-Senior Honors Program in the Department of History is open to juniors interested in concentrating in history who have maintained at least a 3.25 grade point average overall and a 3.5 average in history courses. Applications for the program, which are available in the History Department office in 1029 Tisch Hall, are accepted annually at the end of October, and the usual applicant is a first-term junior. Admission decisions will be based on a student's academic performance, background in history, demonstrated ability to write, and recommendations by history faculty. High grade point average alone does not guarantee admission. Accepted students will be notified in November and will begin their participation in the program the following January in History 398, the Junior Honors Colloquium.

Members of the Honors Program must fulfill all the usual requirements for major in history and the two Honors courses they are required to take, History 398 (4 credits) and History 399 (6 credits), count toward the fulfillment of these requirements. History 398, the Junior Honors Colloquium, provides a rigorous introduction to historical research in general and Honors thesis topics and research in particular. During this course students must arrive at a topic and obtain an advisor for their senior Honors thesis. This course also provides intensive training in writing. Completion of the History 398-399 Honors Sequence also satisfies the "colloquium" requirement for history major, described above.

History 398 is offered only in the winter term and because it is the foundation for work on the senior thesis, it is normally an inflexible prerequisite for all Honors students. Students who cannot fit this course into their schedules will not be admitted to the program. In the case of a truly exceptional student, however, the Honors Committee is willing to waive this requirement when the student is abroad during the second term of junior year but wishes to write a thesis nonetheless. Those who wish to write an Honors thesis in history but do not plan to be in residence during the winter term of junior year, are strongly encouraged to seek out an Honors History advisor during the sophomore year, so that all requirements can be met in a timely fashion. Students failing to achieve a B+ or better in History 398 will not be encouraged to continue in the program.

History 399, the Senior Honors Colloquium, is a year-long writing workshop led by a faculty member which includes all seniors writing Honors theses. Although the thesis is written primarily under the guidance of the faculty advisor, students help one another with projects in the workshop by sharing experiences, advice, interests, and, ultimately, portions of their theses. Completed theses, which must be submitted by April 1, usually range anywhere from 60 to 100 pages. They are evaluated by two faculty members, one of them the student's advisor, on the basis of the quality of the research, analysis, and writing. The letter grade for History 399 and the level of Honors with which the student will be graduated (i.e., "Honors," "high Honors," "highest Honors") are based on the evaluations of the thesis. Theses handed in more than two weeks past the due date are not eligible for an Honors rank.

Students with questions about the program are welcome to pursue them by meeting with the History Department's Honors department advisors.

Teaching Certificate. A teaching certificate with a teaching major in History requires at least 30 credits of history and must include 8 credits of U.S. history (colonial or national period) and two courses in non-United States history. The remaining courses for the teaching major must be distributed in such a way that students acquire a broad understanding of as many subfields as possible. Courses are selected with the approval of the department advisor. A teaching minor requires a minimum 20 credits of history including 8 of U.S. history (colonial or national period) and two courses in non-United States history.

The general requirements for a teaching certificate are described elsewhere in this Bulletin. Students should also consult the School of Education Office of Student Services, 1033 School of Education Building.

 

 


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