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Mathematics departmental information +

Mathematics is the language and tool of the sciences, a cultural phenomenon with a rich historical tradition, and a model of abstract reasoning. Historically, mathematical methods and thinking have been extraordinarily successful in physics and engineering. Today, they are used successfully in many new areas, from computer science to biology and finance. A Mathematics major provides a broad education in various areas of mathematics in a program flexible enough to accommodate a wide range of interests.

The study of mathematics is an excellent preparation for many careers; the patterns of careful logical reasoning and analytical problem solving essential to mathematics are also applicable in contexts where quantity and measurement play only minor roles. Thus students of mathematics may go on to excel in medicine, law, politics, or business as well as any of a vast range of scientific careers. Special programs are offered for those interested in teaching mathematics, in actuarial mathematics, the mathematics of insurance, or financial mathematics. The other programs split between those which emphasize mathematics as an independent discipline and those which favor the application of mathematical tools to problems in other fields. There is considerable overlap here, and any of these programs may serve as preparation for either further study in a variety of academic disciplines, including mathematics itself, or intellectually challenging careers in a wide variety of corporate and governmental settings. 

 

Mathematics Advising

Appointments are scheduled online at: www.math.lsa.umich.edu/undergrad/. Students are strongly urged to consult with a department advisor each term before selecting courses for the following term.

Mathematics Major

Effective Winter 2014

May be elected as a departmental major

Prerequisites to the Major

Most programs require completion of one of the sequences ending with MATH 215-217, 256-217, 285-217, or 395-396. A working knowledge of a high-level computer language such as C++ or a computer algebra system (such as Maple or Mathematica), at a level equivalent to completion of a course of three or more credits, and eight credits of PHYSICS, preferably PHYSICS 140/141 and 240/241, are recommended for all programs and required for some. (A grade of C- or better is strongly suggested for MATH 217.)

Major GPA Calculation

For purposes of calculating grade point average, the term "field of the major" means the following:

  1. All MATH courses.
  2. All courses used to meet requirements for the major.
  3. All required cognate courses (if any).
  4.  All mandatory prerequisites.
  5. EECS 183
  6. ECON 101 and ECON 102 (actuarial mathematics submajor only).

Requirements for the Major

A student considering a major in Mathematics should consult a mathematics department advisor in the Undergraduate Mathematics Office as early as possible and certainly by the first term of the sophomore year. The department offers many different submajors with varying requirements; failure to meet some of these at the intended time may delay completion of the program and graduation. A plan for the major must be designed with and approved by a department advisor.

 

Mathematics Major (F'10-F'13) +

 effective Fall 2010-Fall 2013

Mathematics

May be elected as a departmental major

For detailed requirements on the Mathematics Program of study in a major consult the brochure Undergraduate Programs & Courses - Department of Mathematics available from the Undergraduate Program Office, 2084 East Hall, (734) 763-4223, or the department's website.

http://www.math.lsa.umich.edu/undergrad/

Prerequisites to the Major

Most programs require completion of one of the sequences ending with MATH 215-217, 256-217, 285-217, or 395-396. A working knowledge of a high-level computer language such as C++ or a computer algebra system (such as Maple or Mathematica), at a level equivalent to completion of a course of three or more credits, and eight credits of PHYSICS, preferably PHYSICS 140/141 and 240/241, are recommended for all programs and required for some. (A grade of C- or better is strongly suggested for MATH 217.)

Field of Major

For purposes of calculating grade point average, the term "field of the major" means the following:

  1. All MATH courses.
  2. All courses used to meet requirements for the major.
  3. All required cognate courses (if any).
  4.  All mandatory prerequisites.
  5. EECS 183, ECON 101, and ECON 102.

Program of study in a major

A student considering a major in Mathematics should consult a mathematics department advisor in the Undergraduate Mathematics Office as early as possible and certainly by the first term of the sophomore year. The department offers many different submajors with varying requirements; failure to meet some of these at the intended time may delay completion of the program and graduation. A plan for the major must be designed with and approved by a department advisor.

 

Mathematics Major (Fall 2004-Summer 2010) +

effective Fall 2004 through Summer 2010 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

For detailed requirements on the Mathematics Concentration Program consult the brochure Undergraduate Programs & Courses - Department of Mathematics available from the Undergraduate Program Office, 2084 East Hall, (734) 763-4223, or the department's website.

 

Prerequisites to Concentration. Most programs require completion of one of the sequences ending with MATH 215-217, 256-217, 285-217, or 395-396. A working knowledge of a high-level computer language such as C++ or a computer algebra system (such as Maple or Mathematica), at a level equivalent to completion of a course of three or more credits, and eight credits of PHYSICS, preferably PHYSICS 140/141 and 240/241, are recommended for all programs and required for some. (A grade of C- or better is strongly suggested for MATH 217.)

Concentration Programs. A student considering a concentration in Mathematics should consult a mathematics concentration advisor in the Undergraduate Mathematics Office as early as possible and certainly by the first term of the sophomore year. The department offers many different subconcentration programs with varying requirements; failure to meet some of these at the intended time may delay completion of the program and graduation. A concentration plan must be designed with and approved by a concentration advisor.

Suconcentration Plans

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Mathematics Major (through Summer 2004) +

Concentration change effective through Summer 2004 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

For detailed requirements on the Mathematics Concentration Program consult the brochure Undergraduate Programs available from the Undergraduate Program Office, 2084 East Hall, (734) 763-4223, or the Department's website.

Prerequisites to Concentration. Most programs require completion of one of the sequences ending with MATH 215-217, 256-217, 285-217, or 395-396. A working knowledge of a high-level computer language such as FORTRAN or C or a computer algebra system (such as Maple or Mathematica), at a level equivalent to completion of a course of three or more credits; and eight credits of PHYSICS, preferably PHYSICS 140/141 and 240/241, are recommended for all programs and required for some.

Concentration Programs. A student considering a concentration in Mathematics should consult a mathematics concentration advisor in the ASUP as early as possible and certainly by the first term of the sophomore year. The Department offers many different concentration programs with varying requirements; failure to meet some of these at the intended time may delay completion of the program and graduation. A concentration plan must be designed with and approved by a concentration advisor. The Departmental brochure Undergraduate Programs should be regarded as the most comprehensive and up-to-date guide to the options and requirements for concentration programs in mathematics.

 



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