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Organizational Studies is an interdisciplinary concentration program, emphasizing the influence of economic, psychological, sociological, political, and other factors on individuals and complex organizational systems. The field is concerned with how organizational systems function, their effects on individuals and the larger society, and with the processes of organizational change. 

The curriculum is designed to provide:

  1. core courses focusing on concepts fundamental to organizational theory and research;
  2. cluster and elective courses to provide breadth and depth in understanding links between the individual and organizations on the one hand, and organizations and society on the other; and
  3. courses designed to provide field-based experience in organizational research, analysis and practice.

The concentration is also designed to balance the study of challenging theoretical issues with diverse and refined methods of empirical inquiry.

Students may find this concentration appropriate preparation for careers or graduate work in business administration, consulting, communication, education, human resources, industrial and organizational psychology, public health, public policy, social and non-profit administration, the sociology of work and organizations, and related fields.

 

Organizational Studies Major

Effective Date: Fall 2014 

May be elected as an interdepartmental major

Prerequisites to major

Students must complete one course in each of the following three areas:

  1. Introduction to Economics (ECON 101)
  2. Introduction to Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115)
  3. Introduction to Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195).

All students should be aware that additional prerequisites are required for many of the upper-level courses in the OS curriculum. Depending on their particular area of interest, students may wish to complete additional entry-level courses in political science, communication studies, women's studies, and/or economics as they prepare to apply to the OS Program.

Application. Students must apply for and be accepted into the major. Students are declared into the major by the department advisor only.

Application for the major can be submitted during the sophomore year. It is preferred that applicants have all three prerequisites completed at the time of application. At a minimum, to be eligible to apply, you must have completed (with final grades showing) at least two of the three prerequisite courses, and be currently enrolled in the third. Admission is very competitive and enrollment in the major will be limited to assure a high quality educational experience. Program faculty will make admission decisions based on a holistic review, with consideration given to overall grade point average at the time of application, with special attention given to grades in the three prerequisite courses, resume,  and a personal statement written by the applicant.

Requirements for the Major.

The major requires a minimum of 37 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. Core requirements. Two courses are required [6 credits]:
    •   ORGSTUDY 305 Inside Organizations
    •   ORGSTUDY 310 Formal Organizations and Environments

     

  2.  Senior Capstone Research Requirement. ORGSTUDY 410 (or ORGSTUDY 498&498 for Honors majors).
  3. Cluster Requirements. 7 courses (21 credits minimum), chosen from Clusters A, B, and C:

    • Two courses must be from Cluster A, two from Cluster B, and the remaining three in any cluster (A,B, or C)
    • Two of the cluster courses must be ORGSTUDY courses. 
    • No more than 2 cluster courses can be at the 200-level


    The cluster requirements are designed to provide disciplinary variety in the study of organizations, drawing on courses in a number of fields, and ranging across multiple levels of organizational analysis.

    1.  Organizations and Individuals (Cluster A) [2 course minimum]. Cluster A courses focus mainly on questions and topics concerning the organized behavior of individuals or the behavior of individuals in organizations. These courses may address the relations of individuals to larger structures such as the family or formal organizations, but their concern with the larger structures will typically remain the impact thereof on individual psychology or individual behavior.

      A complete list of acceptable Cluster A courses is available on the Organizational Studies website.
    2. Organizations and Society (Cluster B) [2 course minimum]. Cluster B courses are those that focus mainly on questions and topics concerning the organization of social groups (e.g., ethnic groups), historical processes (e.g., the rise of capitalism), and/or medium to large social structures (e.g., corporations, national governments, or global governing bodies). Although they may at times address the impact of such larger social structures and processes on individual behavior or may include attention to particular individuals from U.S. or world history, the primary concern of Cluster B courses is with questions about how social groups, historical processes, and social structures emerge, remain stable, and/or change.

      A complete list of acceptable Cluster B courses is available on the Organizational Studies website.
    3.  Interest Cluster Courses (Cluster C) [minimum of 9 credits]. Cluster C courses are electives intended to allow majors to pursue their curriculum pathway interests in a more specialized way. These should have an organizational theme and can be of either the micro or macro variety, but are almost always more narrow and focused in their content.

      A complete list of acceptable Cluster C courses is available on the Organizational Studies website.

    Courses taken as ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies, ORGSTUDY 490 Advanced Research Team, and ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics may be included, when appropriate and in consultation with the department advisor, as a course in Cluster A, Cluster B, or Cluster C.

  4.    Quantitative Skills Requirements [3 credit minimum]. One course from the following:
    • SOC 210
    • STATS 250, 400, or 405
    • ECON 404 or 405.
  5. Electives (as needed). Students may choose electives from any requirement area on the OS curriculum list as needed to reach the overall 37 credit requirement for the OS major.


Additional courses may on occasion be used as part of the plan for the major with written approval from the department advisor. 

Also, no more than six credits of upper-level independent study / experiential credit may count toward the major.  ORGSTUDY 499 does not automatically count toward the major, but may be petitioned in individual cases.

 

Organizational Studies Honors Program

Organizational Studies Major (Fall 2009-Summer 2014) +

Effective Date: Fall 2009 - Summer 2014

May be elected as an interdepartmental major

Prerequisites to major. 

Students must complete one course in each of the following three areas:

  1. Introduction to Economics (ECON 101)
  2. Introduction to Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115)
  3. Introduction to Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195).

All students should be aware that additional prerequisites are required for many of the upper-level courses in the OS curriculum. Depending on their particular area of interest, students may wish to complete additional entry-level courses in political science, communication studies, women's studies, and/or economics as they prepare to apply to the OS Program.

Application. Students must apply for and be accepted into the major. Students are declared into the major by the department advisor only.

Application for the major can be submitted during the sophomore year. It is preferred that applicants have all three prerequisites completed at the time of application. At a minimum, to be eligible to apply, you must have completed (with final grades showing) at least two of the three prerequisite courses, and be currently enrolled in the third. Admission is very competitive and enrollment in the major will be limited to assure a high quality educational experience. Program faculty will make admission decisions based on a holistic review, with consideration given to overall grade point average at the time of application, with special attention given to grades in the three prerequisite courses, resume,  and a personal statement written by the applicant.

Requirements for the Major:

 The major requires a minimum of 37 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. Core requirements. Two courses are required [6 credits]:

    • ORGSTUDY 305 Inside Organizations
    • ORGSTUDY 310 Formal Organizations and Environments

  2. Cluster A and B Requirement. Minimum of four courses total, across both clusters, with at least two courses in each cluster listed below [12 credits minimum]. The cluster requirements are designed to provide disciplinary variety in the study of organizations, drawing on courses in a number of fields, and ranging across multiple levels of organizational analysis.

    Courses taken as ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies and ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics may be included, when appropriate and in consultation with the department advisor, as a course in Cluster A, Cluster B, or Cluster C.


    1. Organizations and Individuals (Cluster A). Cluster A courses focus mainly on questions and topics concerning the organized behavior of individuals or the behavior of individuals in organizations. These courses may address the relations of individuals to larger structures such as the family or formal organizations, but their concern with the larger structures will typically remain the impact thereof on individual psychology or individual behavior

      • A complete list of acceptable Cluster A courses is available on the Organizational Studies website

    2. Organizations and Society (Cluster B). Cluster B courses are those that focus mainly on questions and topics concerning the organization of social groups (e.g., ethnic groups), historical processes (e.g., the rise of capitalism), and /or medium to large social structures (e.g., corporations, national governments, or global governing bodies).  Although they may at times address the impact of such larger social structures and processes on individual behavior or may include attention to particular individuals from U.S. or world history, the primary concern of Cluster B courses is with questions about how social groups, historical processes, and social structures emerge, remain stable, and/or change.

      • A complete list of acceptable Cluster B courses is available on the Organizational Studies website

  3. Field Research and Quantitative Skills Requirements: Analysis, Research and Practice in Organizations [7 credits]. The field research and quantitative skills requirement is designed to provide  quantitative, analytical, and experiential learning opportunities for research, analysis, and practice in a wide range of organizational settings. One course from each area is required; the research requirement must be completed in the senior year.

    1. Quantitative Skills: One course from the following: SOC 210; STATS 250 (or 350), 400 or 405; ECON 404 or 405.

    2. Senior Field Research* Requirement (prior or concurrent enrollment in the quantitative skills requirement is strongly recommended):

      • A complete list of acceptable Senior Field Research courses is available on the Organizational Studies website

        *The research requirement must be completed in the senior year. Any research courses taken in the junior year will count in Cluster C. Any extra courses taken in the research section may count in cluster C or as electives. ORGSTUDY 498 is not listed the research section because in all cases, the research requirement will have already been met by ORGSTUDY 497 in the previous term, and thus ORGSTUDY 498 will always count in Cluster C or as an elective

  4. Interest Cluster Courses (Cluster C) [minimum of 9 credits]. Cluster C courses are electives intended to allow majors to pursue their curriculum pathway interests in a more specialized way. These should have an organizational theme and can be of either the micro or macro variety, but are almost always more narrow and focused in their content.

    • A complete list of acceptable Cluster C courses is available on the Organizational Studies website

  5. Electives (as needed). Students may choose electives from any requirement area on the OS curriculum list as needed to reach the overall 37 credit requirement for the OS major.

    Additional courses may on occasion be used as part of the plan for the major with written approval from the department advisor. Also, no more than six credits of upper-level independent study / experiential credit may count toward the major.

Honors Program

Organizational Studies Major (Fall 2008-Summer 2009) +

 

Effective Date: Fall 2008 through Summer 2009 

May be elected as an interdepartmental major

Prerequisites to major. 

Students must complete one course in each of the following three areas:

  1.  Introduction to Economics (ECON 101)
  2. Introduction to Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115)
  3. Introduction to Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195).

All students should be aware that additional prerequisites are required for many of the upper-level courses in the OS curriculum. Depending on their particular area of interest, students may wish to complete additional entry-level courses in political science, communication studies, women's studies, or economics as they prepare to apply to the OS Program.

Application. Students must apply for and be accepted into the major. Students are declared into the major by the department advisor only.

Application for the major can be submitted during the sophomore year. It is preferred that applicants have all three prerequisites completed at the time of application. At a minimum, to be eligible to apply, you must have completed (with final grades showing) at least two of the three prerequisite courses, and be currently enrolled in the third. Admission is very competitive and enrollment in the major will be limited to assure a high quality educational experience. Program faculty will make admission decisions based on overall grade point average at the time of application, with special attention given to grades in the three prerequisite courses, and a personal statement written by the applicant.

 

Requirements for the Major:

 The major requires a minimum of 37 credits, distributed as follows:

  1.  Core requirements. Two courses are required [6 credits]:
    • ORGSTUDY 305 Inside Organizations

    • ORGSTUDY 310 Formal Organizations and Environments

  2.  Cluster A and B Requirement. Minimum of four courses total, across both clusters, with at least two courses in each cluster listed below [12 credits minimum]. The cluster requirements are designed to provide disciplinary variety in the study of organizations, drawing on courses in a number of fields, and ranging across multiple levels of organizational analysis.

     

    Courses taken as ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies and ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics may be included, when appropriate and in consultation with the department advisor, as a course in Cluster A, Cluster B, or Cluster C.

    1.  Organizations and Individuals (Cluster A)
      •  ANTHRCUL 330 Culture, Thought, and Meaning
      •  ANTHRCUL 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
      •  ANTHRCUL 374 Language and Culture
      •  COMM 361 Mediated Communication
      •  COMM 381 Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior
      •  ECON 401 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
      •  ENVIRON 360 Behavior and Environment
      •  LING 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
      •  LING 374 Language and Culture
      •  ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies (appropriate topics)
      • ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics
      •  POLSCI 330 Psychological Perspectives on Politics
      •  PSYCH 260 Organizational Psychology
      •  PSYCH 280 Social Psychology
      •  PSYCH 353 Social Development
      •  PSYCH 384 Behavior and Environment
      •  PSYCH 393 Political Psychology
      •  PSYCH 449 Decision Processes
      •  PSYCH 464 Group Processes
    2.  Organizations and Society (Cluster B)
      •  AMCULT 345 American Politics and Society
      •  AMCULT 421 Social Stratification
      •  COMM 351 Structure and Function of Media Systems
      •  COMM 371 Media, Culture, and Society
      •  ECON 320 Survey of Labor Economics
      •  ECON 330 American Industries
      •  ECON 421 Labor Economics I
      •  ECON 422 The Structure of Labor Markets
      •  ECON 431 Industrial Organization and Performance
      •  ECON 432 Government Regulation of Industry
      •  ECON 471 Environmental Economics
      •  ECON 491 History of the American Economy
      •  ENGLISH 319 Literature and Social Change
      •  HISTORY 310 Globalization in History
      •  HISTORY 491 History of the American Economy
      •  NRE 571 Environmental Economics
      •  ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies (appropriate topics)
      • ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics
      •  POLSCI 300 Contemporary Political Issues
      •  POLSCI 311 American Political Processes
      •  POLSCI 317 Courts, Politics and Society
      •  POLSCI 363 International Organization and Integration
      •  RCSSCI 310 Globalization in History
      •  RCSSCI 311 Contemporary Globalization
      •  SOC 305 Introduction to Sociological Theory
      •  SOC 311 Contemporary Globalization
      •  SOC 315 Economic Sociology
      •  SOC 423 Social Stratification
      •  SOC 450 Political Sociology
      •  SOC 460 Social Change
      • STRATEGY 411 The Corporation in Society
  3.  Field Research and Quantitative Skills Requirements: Analysis, Research and Practice in Organizations [7 credits]. The field research and quantitative skills requirement is designed to provide both quantitative analytic and experiential learning opportunities for research, analysis, and practice in a wide range of organizational settings. One course from each area required; research requirement must be completed in the senior year.
    1. Quantitative Skills: One course from the following: SOC 210; STATS 350, 400 or 405; ECON 404 or 405.
    2. Senior Field Research Requirement (prior or concurrent enrollment in the quantitative skills requirement is strongly recommended):
      •  ORGSTUDY 410 Advanced Research Methods in Organizational Studies.
      •  ORGSTUDY 490 Advanced Research Team
      •  ORGSTUDY 497 Senior Honors Research I
  4. Interest Cluster Courses (Cluster C)   [minimum of 9 credits].
    •  AMCULT 339. American Religious Movements
    •  ANTHRCUL 339 American Religious Movements
    •  ANTHRCUL 439 Economic Anthropology and Development
    •  ARCH 423 Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
    •  CAAS 418 Black Americans and the Political System
    •  CAAS 450 Law, Race, and the Historical Process I
    •  CAAS 451 Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.
    •  COMM 454 Media Economics
    •  COMM 473 Cross-Cultural Communication
    •  COMM 484 Mass Media and Political Behavior
    •  COMM 485 Mass Communication and Public Opinion
    •  ECON 340 International Economics
    •  ECON 360 Developing Economies
    •  ECON 370 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
    •  ECON 398 Strategy and Equity
    •  ECON 438 Economics of Health Services
    •  ECON 481 Government Revenues
    •  ENVIRON 361 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
    •  ENVIRON 365 International Environmental Policy
    •  ENVIRON 367 Global Enterprise and Sustainable Development
    •  ENVIRON 370 Intro to Urban and Environmental Planning
    •  ENVIRON 375 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
    •  ENVIRON 449 Organizational Theory and Change
    •  HB 502 Org, Comm, Soc Strct & Processes
    •  HISTORY 476 American Business History
    •  HMP 602 Survey of the US Health Care System
    •  HMP 620 Understanding Structure & Mgmt Non-Prof Hlth Orgs
    •  HMP 661 Economics of Health Services
    •  LHC 305 Legal Environ of Business
    •  LHC 306 Law of Enterprise Organization
    •  LHC 321 Corporate Social Responsibility
    •  LHC 412 American Business History
    •  LING 305 Advertising Rhetoric
    •  MKT 300 Marketing Management I
    •  MO 300 Behavior Theory in Management
    •  MO 314 Managing Change
    •  MO 315 Management of Personnel
    •  MO 324 Organizational Design
    •  MO 470 Mgmt of Professional Service Firms
    •  ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies
    •  ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics in Organizational Studies
    •  ORGSTUDY 498 Senior Honors Research II
    •  ORGSTUDY 499 Independent Study
    •  POLSCI 313 Political Mobilization and Policy Change
    •  POLSCI 324 Black Americans and the Political System
    •  POLSCI 360 Problems in World Politics
    •  POLSCI 368 Cooperation and Conflict in the International System
    •  POLSCI 369 Politics of International Economic Relations
    • POLSCI 484 Mass Media and Political Behavior
    •  POLSCI 486 Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups
    •  PSYCH 385 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
    •  PSYCH 411 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    •  PSYCH 467 Current Topics in Organizational Psychology
    •  PSYCH 488 Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior
    •  RCSSCI 222 Strategies and Social Interaction
    •  RCSSCI 315 International Grassroots Development
    •  RCSSCI 365 Excellence, Equity, and Politics of Education
    •  RELIGION 455 Religion and Society
    •  SM 332 Organizational Behavior in Sports Orgs
    •  SOC 222 Strategies and Social Interaction
    •  SOC 440 Sociology of Work
    •  SOC 447 Sociology of Gender
    •  SOC 452 Law and Social Psychology
    •  SOC 454 Law and Social Organization
    •  SOC 455 Religion and Society
    •  SOC 458 Sociology of Education
    •  SOC 463 Mass Communication and Public Opinion
    •  SOC 465 Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior
    •  SOC 475 Introduction to Medical Sociology
    •  THTREMUS 385 Performing Arts Management
    •  UP 423 Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
    •  WOMENSTD 419 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    •  WOMENSTD 447 Sociology of Gender
  5. Electives (as needed). Students may choose electives from any requirement area on the OS curriculum list as needed to reach the overall 37 credit requirement for the OS major.
  1. Additional courses may on occasion be used as part of the plan for the major with written approval from the department advisor. Also, no more than six credits of upper-level independent study/experiential credit may count toward the major.

Organizational Studies Major (effective Winter 2007 through Summer 2008) +

 Effective Date : Winter 2007 through Summer 2008

May be elected as an interdepartmental major

 

Prerequisites to major

Students must complete one course in each of the following three areas:

 

  1. Introduction to Economics (ECON 101)
  2. Introduction to Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115)
  3. Introduction to Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195).

All students should be aware that additional prerequisites are required for many of the upper-level courses in the OS curriculum. Depending on their particular area of interest, students may wish to complete ECON 102 and/or entry-level courses in political science, communication studies, economics, or women's studies as they prepare to apply to the OS Program.

Application. Students must apply for and be accepted into the major. Students are declared into the major by the department advisor only.

Application for the major can be submitted during the sophomore year. It is preferred that applicants have all three prerequisites completed at the time of application. At a minimum, to be eligible to apply, you must have completed (with final grades showing) at least two of the three prerequisite courses, and be currently enrolled in the third. Admission is very competitive and enrollment in the major will be limited to assure a high quality educational experience. Program faculty will make admission decisions based on overall grade point average at the time of application, with special attention given to grades in the three prerequisite courses, and a personal statement written by the applicant.

Requirements for the Major

The major requires a minimum of 37 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. Core requirements. Two courses are required [6 credits]:

     

     

    ¬タᄁ  ORGSTUDY 305 Social Organization and Coordination

     

    ¬タᄁ  ORGSTUDY 310 Formal Organizations and Environments

  2. Cluster A and B Requirement. Minimum of four courses total, across both clusters, with at least two courses in each cluster listed below [12 credits minimum]. The cluster requirements are designed to provide disciplinary variety in the study of organizations, drawing on courses in a number of fields, and ranging across multiple levels of organizational analysis.

     

    Courses taken as ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies and ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics may be included, when appropriate and in consultation with the department advisor, as a course in Cluster A, Cluster B, or Cluster C.

    1. Organizations and Individuals (Cluster A)

      • ANTHRCUL 330 Culture, Thought, and Meaning
      • ANTHRCUL 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
      • ANTHRCUL 374 Language and Culture
      • COMM 361 Mediated Communication
      • COMM 381 Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior
      • ECON 401 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
      • ENVIRON 360 Behavior and Environment
      • LING 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
      • LING 374 Language and Culture
      • ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies (appropriate topics)
      • POLSCI 330 Psychological Perspectives on Politics
      • PSYCH 260 Organizational Psychology
      • PSYCH 280 Social Psychology
      • PSYCH 353 Social Development
      • PSYCH 384 Behavior and Environment
      • PSYCH 393 Political Psychology
      • PSYCH 449 Decision Processes
      • PSYCH 464 Group Processes
    2. Organizations and Society (Cluster B)
      • AMCULT 345 American Politics and Society
      • AMCULT 421 Social Stratification
      • COMM 351 Structure and Function of Media Systems
      • COMM 371 Media, Culture, and Society
      • CSIB 411 The Corporation in Society
      • ECON 320 Survey of Labor Economics
      • ECON 330 American Industries
      • ECON 421 Labor Economics I
      • ECON 422 The Structure of Labor Markets
      • ECON 431 Industrial Organization and Performance
      • ECON 432 Government Regulation of Industry
      • ECON 471 Environmental Economics
      • ECON 491 History of the American Economy
      • ENGLISH 319 Literature and Social Change
      • HISTORY 310 Globalization in History
      • HISTORY 491 History of the American Economy
      • NRE 571 Environmental Economics
      • ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies (appropriate topics)
      • POLSCI 300 Contemporary Political Issues
      • POLSCI 311 American Political Processes
      • POLSCI 317 Courts, Politics and Society
      • POLSCI 322 Legislative Process
      • POLSCI 322 Legislative Process
      • POLSCI 363 International Organization and Integration
      • RCSSCI 310 Globalization in History
      • RCSSCI 311 Contemporary Globalization
      • SOC 305 Introduction to Sociological Theory
      • SOC 311 Contemporary Globalization
      • SOC 315 Economic Sociology
      • SOC 423 Social Stratification
      • SOC 450 Political Sociology
      • SOC 460 Social Change
  3. Field Research and Quantitative Skills Requirements: Analysis, Research and Practice in Organizations [7 credits]. The field research and quantitative skills requirement is designed to provide both quantitative analytic and experiential learning opportunities for research, analysis, and practice in a wide range of organizational settings. One course from each area required.

    1. Quantitative Skills: One course from the following: SOC 210; STATS 350, 400 or 405; ECON 404 or 405.
    2. Senior Field Research Requirement (prior or concurrent enrollment in the quantitative skills requirement is strongly recommended):
      • ORGSTUDY 410 Advanced Research Methods in Organizational Studies.
      • ORGSTUDY 490 Advanced Research Team
      • ORGSTUDY 497 Senior Honors Research I
  4. Interest Cluster Courses (Cluster C)   [minimum of 9 credits].
    • AMCULT 339. American Religious Movements
    • ANTHRCUL 339 American Religious Movements
    • ANTHRCUL 439 Economic Anthropology and Development
    • ARCH 423 Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
    • CAAS 418 Black Americans and the Political System
    • CAAS 450 Law, Race, and the Historical Process I
    • CAAS 451 Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.
    • COMM 454 Media Economics
    • COMM 473 Cross-Cultural Communication
    • COMM 484 Mass Media and Political Behavior
    • COMM 485 Mass Communication and Public Opinion
    • ECON 340 International Economics
    • ECON 360 Developing Economies
    • ECON 370 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
    • ECON 398 Strategy and Equity
    • ECON 438 Economics of Health Services
    • ECON 481 Government Revenues
    • ENVIRON 361 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
    • ENVIRON 365 International Environmental Policy
    • ENVIRON 367 Global Enterprise and Sustainable Development
    • ENVIRON 370 Intro to Urban and Environmental Planning
    • ENVIRON 375 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
    • ENVIRON 449 Organizational Theory and Change
    • HB 502 Org, Comm, Soc Strct & Processes
    • HISTORY 476 American Business History
    • HMP 602 Survey of the US Health Care System
    • HMP 620 Understanding Structure & Mgmt Non-Prof Hlth Orgs
    • HMP 661 Economics of Health Services
    • LHC 305 Legal Environ of Business
    • LHC 306 Law of Enterprise Organization
    • LHC 321 Corporate Social Responsibility
    • LHC 412 American Business History
    • LING 305 Advertising Rhetoric
    • MKT 300 Marketing Management I
    • MO 300 Behavior Theory in Management
    • MO 314 Managing Change
    • MO 315 Management of Personnel
    • MO 324 Organizational Design
    • MO 470 Mgmt of Professional Service Firms
    • ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies (appropriate topics)
    • ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics in Organizational Studies
    • ORGSTUDY 498 Senior Honors Research II
    • ORGSTUDY 499 Independent Study
    • POLSCI 313 Political Mobilization and Policy Change
    • POLSCI 324 Black Americans and the Political System
    • POLSCI 325 Mass Media and Political Behavior
    • POLSCI 360 Problems in World Politics
    • POLSCI 368 Cooperation and Conflict in the International System
    • POLSCI 369 Politics of International Economic Relations
    • POLSCI 486 Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups
    • PSYCH 385 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
    • PSYCH 411 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    • PSYCH 467 Current Topics in Organizational Psychology
    • PSYCH 488 Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior
    • RCSSCI 222 Strategies and Social Interaction
    • RCSSCI 315 International Grassroots Development
    • RCSSCI 365 Excellence, Equity, and Politics of Education
    • RELIGION 455 Religion and Society
    • SM 332 Organizational Behavior in Sports Orgs
    • SOC 222 Strategies and Social Interaction
    • SOC 440 Sociology of Work
    • SOC 447 Sociology of Gender
    • SOC 452 Law and Social Psychology
    • SOC 454 Law and Social Organization
    • SOC 455 Religion and Society
    • SOC 458 Sociology of Education
    • SOC 463 Mass Communication and Public Opinion
    • SOC 465 Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior
    • SOC 475 Introduction to Medical Sociology
    • THTREMUS 385 Performing Arts Management
    • UP 423 Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
    • WOMENSTD 419 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    • WOMENSTD 447 Sociology of Gender
  5. Electives (as needed). Students may choose electives from any requirement area on the OS curriculum list as needed to reach the overall 37 credit requirement for the OS major. Additional courses may on occasion be used as part of the plan for the major with written approval from the department advisor. Also, no more than six credits of upper-level independent study/experiential credit may count toward the major.

Organizational Studies Major (Spring 2006 through Fall 2006 ) +

Effective Date for major change: Spring 2006 through Fall 2006 

 May be elected as an interdepartmental major

Prerequisites to major

Students must complete one course in each of the following three areas:

1. Introduction to Economics (ECON 101)

2. Introduction to Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115)

3. Introduction to Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195).

All students should be aware that additional prerequisites are required for many of the upper-level courses in the OS curriculum. Depending on their particular area of interest, students may wish to complete ECON 102 and/or entry-level courses in political science, communication studies, political science, or women's studies as they prepare to apply to the OS Program.

Application. Students must apply for and be accepted into the major. Students are declared into the major by the department advisor only.

Application for the major can be submitted during the sophomore year. It is preferred that applicants have all three prerequisites completed at the time of application. At a minimum, to be eligible to apply, you must have completed (with final grades showing) at least two of the three prerequisite courses, and be currently enrolled in the third. Admission is very competitive and enrollment in the major will be limited to assure a high quality educational experience. Program faculty will make admission decisions based on overall grade point average at the time of application, with special attention given to grades in the three prerequisite courses, and a personal statement written by the applicant.

Program of study in a major

The major requires a minimum of 38 credits, distributed as follows:

1.   Core requirements. Two courses are required [6 credits]:

  • ORGSTUDY 305 Social Organization and Coordination
  • ORGSTUDY 310 Formal Organizations and Environments

2.   Cluster A and B Requirement. Minimum of five courses total, across both clusters, with at least two courses in each cluster listed below [15 credits minimum]. The cluster requirements are designed to provide disciplinary variety in the study of organizations, drawing on courses in a number of fields, and ranging across multiple levels of organizational analysis.

      Courses taken as ORGSTUDY 395 Current Issues in Organizational Studies and 495 Special Topics may be included, when appropriate and in consultation with the department advisor, as a course in Cluster A, Cluster B, or Cluster C.

A. Organizations and Individuals (Cluster A)

  • ANTHRCUL 330 Culture, Thought, and Meaning
  • ANTHRCUL 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
  • ANTHRCUL 374 Language and Culture
  • COMM 361 Mediated Communication
  • COMM 381 Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior
  • ENVIRON 360 Behavior and Environment
  • LING 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
  • LING 374 Language and Culture
  • POLSCI 330 Psychological Perspectives on Politics
  • PSYCH 260 Organizational Psychology
  • PSYCH 280 Social Psychology
  • PSYCH 384 Behavior and Environment
  • PSYCH 393 Political Psychology
  • PSYCH 449 Decision Processes
  • PSYCH 464 Group Processes

 

]B. Organizations and Society (Cluster B)

  • AMCULT 345 American Politics and Society
  • AMCULT 421 Social Stratification
  • ANTHRCUL 332 Social Forms
  • COMM 351 Structure and Function of Media Systems
  • COMM 371 Media, Culture, and Society
  • ECON 320 Survey of Labor Economics
  • ECON 330 American Industries
  • ECON 401 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
  • ECON 421 Labor Economics I
  • ECON 422 The Structure of Labor Markets
  • ECON 431 Industrial Organization and Performance
  • ECON 432 Government Regulation of Industry
  • ECON 491 History of the American Economy
  • HISTORY 491 History of the American Economy
  • POLSCI 300 Contemporary Political Issues
  • POLSCI 311 American Political Processes
  • POLSCI 317 Courts, Politics and Society
  • POLSCI 322 Legislative Process
  • SOC 305 Introduction to Sociological Theory
  • SOC 315 Economic Sociology
  • SOC 423 Social Stratification
  • SOC 442 Occupations and Professions
  • SOC 450 Political Sociology
  • SOC 460. Social Change

 

3.   Field Research and Quantitative Skills Requirements: Analysis, Research and Practice in Organizations [8 credits]. The field research and quantitative skills requirement is designed to provide both quantitative analytic and experiential learning opportunities for research, analysis, and practice in a wide range of organizational settings. One course from each area required.

A.  Quantitative Skills: One course from the following: SOC 210; STATS 350, 400 or 405; ECON 404 or 405.

B.   Field Research: ORGSTUDY 410 Advanced Research Methods in Organizational Studies. Prior or concurrent enrollment in the quantitative skills requirement is strongly recommended.

4.   Interest Cluster Courses (Cluster C) [minimum of 9 credits].

  • AMCULT 339. American Religious Movements
  • ANTHRCUL 339 American Religious Movements
  • ANTHRCUL 439 Economic Anthropology and Development
  • CAAS 434 Social Organization of Black Communities
  • CAAS 450 Law, Race, and the Historical Process I
  • CAAS 451 Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.
  • COMM 454 Media Economics
  • COMM 484 Mass Media and Political Behavior
  • COMM 485 Mass Communication and Public Opinion
  • ECON 340 International Economics
  • ECON 360 Developing Economies
  • ECON 370 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
  • ECON 398 Strategy and Equity
  • ECON 471 Environmental Economics
  • ECON 481 Government Revenues
  • ECON 482 Government Expenditures
  • ENVIRON 361 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
  • ENVIRON 375 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
  • ENVIRON 449 Organizational Theory and Change
  • HISTORY 476 American Business History
  • LHC 305 Legal Environ of Business
  • LHC 306 Law of EnterpriseOrganization
  • LHC 321 Corporate Social Responsibility
  • LHC 412 American Business History
  • LING 305 Advertising Rhetoric
  • MKT 300 Marketing Management I
  • MKT 301 Marketing Management II
  • MO 300 Behavior Theory in Management
  • MO 314 Managing Change
  • MO 315 Management of Personnel
  • MO 317 Interpersonal Processes and Teamwork
  • MO 322 Management-Union Relations
  • MO 324 Organizational Design
  • NRE 449 Organizational Theory and Change
  • NRE 571 Environmental Economics
  • ORGSTUDY 395 Exploring Careers in Organizational Studies (appropriate topics)
  • ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics in Organizational Studies
  • ORGSTUDY 497 Senior Honors Research I
  • ORGSTUDY 498 Senior Honors Research II
  • ORGSTUDY 499 Independent Study
  • POLSCI 313 Political Mobilization and Policy Change
  • POLSCI 325 Mass Media and Political Behavior
  • POLSCI 360 Problems in World Politics
  • POLSCI 368 Cooperation and Conflict in the International System
  • POLSCI 369 Politics of International Economic Relations
  • POLSCI 486 Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups
  • PSYCH 385 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
  • PSYCH 411 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
  • PSYCH 467 Current Topics in Organizational Psychology
  • SOC 434 Social Organization of Black Communities
  • SOC 440 Sociology of Work
  • SOC 447 Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 452 Law and Social Psychology
  • SOC 454 Law and Social Organization
  • SOC 463 Mass Communication and Public Opinion
  • THTREMUS 385 Performing Arts Management
  • WOMENSTD 230 Women's Movements
  • WOMENSTD 419 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
  • WOMENSTD 447 Sociology of Gender

 

Additional courses may on occasion be used as part of the plan for the major with written approval from the department advisor. Also, no more than six credits of upper-level independent study/experiential credit may count toward the major.

 

Honors Program

The Organizational Studies Honors Plan is designed to enable advanced undergraduate students to gain experience in the design, conduct, and analysis of research on organizations and organizational behavior. In the program, the Honors student will collaborate directly with a faculty mentor to complete an original research project. For students with strong academic records and an interest in research, the Honors program can serve as a capstone for undergraduate studies, and as important preparation for graduate studies or other future endeavors.

The Organizational Studies Honors Plan (OSHC) is focused solely on research skills and activities, and interested students should be certain that they have a serious interest in academic research and the capability and desire to complete a prolonged independent study project culminating in a major empirical research paper.

Overall Structure and Effort for Honors Plan

During the junior year, interested students must apply for and be accepted into the OSHC. The application must include a detailed research proposal, supported and signed by the faculty mentor. If admitted, the student will enroll in the OS Senior Honors Research sequence in the senior year (ORGSTUDY 497 & 498). These are independent study courses in which the student will work on research and a thesis with a faculty mentor.

For OSHC students, the Honors thesis will become the defining feature of the senior year. Completing an Honors research project requires a commitment of at least two terms working in an independent study format, meeting on a regular basis with a faculty mentor. A complete first draft of the thesis should be submitted to the faculty mentor early in the second semester of the project. The Honors student must submit the final thesis for evaluation by a faculty panel by March 10. The student will also present the research at the Organizational Studies Honors Symposium in late March. If the thesis is approved and LS&A cumulative GPA requirements are met, an Honors designation will appear on the student's transcript and diploma.

Arrange Student-Faculty Collaboration on a Specific Project

Students interested in the OSHC should begin exploring research interests during the first semester of the junior year. By February 1 of the junior year, the student should identify a specific UM faculty member who has research interests similar to the student's own. The faculty mentor must be a tenure-track faculty member at the University of Michigan (may be non-LS&A). Successful partnerships often result from projects that extend ongoing research by the faculty mentor, but an original student project is also possible. For the Honors project, student and faculty mentor agree to work as a team for two terms to design and complete an empirical study.

Formal Application to the OS Honors Plan

To qualify for the OSHC, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher, and must maintain it through graduation. To apply to the OSHC, an application including a project proposal that has been approved by the faculty mentor must be submitted. The proposal should be a minimum of 5 pages, and must include:

  • A brief overview of the project, including the research question to be answered;
  • An explanation of the research design, data collection methods or data source to be used (include IRB submission info);
  • A brief discussion of the analysis plan and expected results;
  • A list of relevant references to the literature;

An initial plan of work with a timeline.

Deadline for submitting OS Honors Plan application: March 1 of the junior year

Applications may be obtained at the OS Program office (713 Dennison) or on the OS website. Following submission of the OSHC application, the OS Program will schedule an "Evaluation and Feedback Session" that the student and faculty mentor will attend. The OS Honors Committee will ask questions about the proposal, and suggest any revisions. Following this session, the Committee will reach a decision on the proposal and notify the student and faculty mentor no later than April 15th. If approved, research may start in the summer if feasible.

Program Completion

An original research report (thesis) must be completed, in collaboration with the faculty mentor. The thesis must be formatted as a standard research journal submission, and is typically 30-40 pages in length. The Honors student must submit the final thesis to the faculty mentor by March 10, and also must present the findings at the OS Honors Symposium in late March.

Each thesis is evaluated by a faculty panel consisting of three readers: the faculty mentor, an independent faculty reader, and the OS Program Director. The independent faculty reader is chosen by the student and the faculty mentor, must be a tenure-track faculty member (may be non-LS&A), and should be someone who has adequate knowledge of the research area but no previous connection to the project. The readers will complete their evaluation of the thesis by April 20.

To receive an Honors designation on the college degree, the faculty readers must approve the thesis, and the Honors student must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.50 at graduation.

Students interested in the Organizational Studies Honors Plan may obtain further information at the OS Program office (713 Dennison) or on the OS website.


Organizational Studies Major ( Spring 2004 through Winter 2006) +

May be elected as an interdepartmental major
Effective Date for major change: Spring 2004 through Winter 2006 

Prerequisites to major

 Students must complete one course in each of the following three areas:

  1. Introduction to Economics (ECON 101)
  2. Introduction to Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115)
  3. Introduction to Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195)

 

All students should be aware that additional prerequisites are required for many of the upper-level courses in the OS curriculum. Depending on their particular area of interest, students may wish to complete ECON 102 and/or entry-level courses in political science, communication studies, or women's studies as they prepare to apply to the OS Program.

Application. Students must apply for and be accepted into the major. Students are declared into the major by the department advisor only.

Application for the major can be submitted during the sophomore year. It is preferred that applicants have all three prerequisites completed at the time of application. At a minimum, to be eligible to apply, you must have completed (with final grades showing) at least two of the three prerequisite courses, and be currently enrolled in the third. Admission is very competitive and enrollment in the major will be limited to assure a high quality educational experience. Program faculty will make admission decisions based on overall grade point average at the time of application, with special attention given to grades in the three prerequisite courses, and a personal statement written by the applicant.

 

Requirements for the Major

The major requires a minimum of 38 credits, distributed as follows:

  1.  Core requirements. Two courses are required [6 credits]:
    • ORGSTUDY 305 Social Organization and Coordination
    • ORGSTUDY 310 Formal Organizations and Environments
  2.  Cluster A and B Requirement. Minimum of five courses total, across both clusters, with at least two courses in each cluster listed below. [15 credits minimum]. The cluster requirements are designed to provide disciplinary variety in the study of organizations, drawing on courses in a number of fields, and ranging across multiple levels of organizational analysis. Courses taken as ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics may be included, when appropriate and in consultation with the department advisor, as a course in Core, Cluster A, Cluster B, or Cluster C.
    1.  Organizations and Individuals (Cluster A)
      • ANTHRCUL 330 Culture, Thought, and Meaning
      • ANTHRCUL 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
      • ANTHRCUL 374 Language and Culture
      • COMM 361 Mediated Communication
      • COMM 381 Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior
      • ENVIRON 360 Behavior and Environment
      • LING 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
      • LING 374 Language and Culture
      • POLSCI 330 Psychological Perspectives on Politics
      • PSYCH 260 Organizational Psychology
      • PSYCH 280 Social Psychology
      • PSYCH 330 Psychological Perspectives on Politics
      • PSYCH 384 Behavior and Environment
      • PSYCH 393 Political Psychology
      • PSYCH 449 Decision Processes
      • PSYCH 464 Group Processes
    2.  Organizations and Society (Cluster B):
      • AMCULT 345 American Politics and Society
      • AMCULT 421 Social Stratification
      • ANTHRCUL 332 Social Forms
      • COMM 351 Structure and Function of Media Systems
      • COMM 371 Media, Culture, and Society
      • ECON 320 Survey of Labor Economics
      • ECON 330 American Industries
      • ECON 401 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
      • ECON 421 Labor Economics I
      • ECON 422 The Structure of Labor Markets
      • ECON 431 Industrial Organization and Performance
      • ECON 432 Government Regulation of Industry
      • ECON 491 History of the American Economy
      • HISTORY 491 History of the American Economy
      • POLSCI 300 Contemporary Political Issues
      • POLSCI 311 American Political Processes
      • POLSCI 317 Courts, Politics and Society
      • POLSCI 322 Legislative Process
      • SOC 305 Introduction to Sociological Theory
      • SOC 315 Economic Sociology
      • SOC 442 Occupations and Professions
      • SOC 450 Political Sociology
      • SOC 460 Social Change
  3.  Field Research and Quantitative Skills Requirements: Analysis, Research and Practice in Organizations [8 credits]. The field research and quantitative skills requirement is designed to provide both quantitative analytic and experiential learning opportunities for research, analysis, and practice in a wide range of organizational settings. One course from each area required.
    1.  Quantitative Skills: One course from the following: SOC 210; STATS 350, 400 or 405; ECON 404 or 405.
    2.  Field Research: ORGSTUDY 410 Advanced Research Methods in Organizational Studies. Prior or concurrent enrollment in the quantitative skills requirement is strongly recommended.
  4.  Interest Cluster Courses (Cluster C): [minimum of 9 credits]
    • AMCULT 339 American Religious Movements
    • ANTHRCUL 339 American Religious Movements
    • ANTHRCUL 439 Economic Anthropology and Development
    • CAAS 434 Social Organization of Black Communities
    • CAAS 450 Law, Race, and the Historical Process I
    • CAAS 451 Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.
    • COMM 454 Media Economics
    • COMM 484 Mass Media and Political Behavior
    • COMM 485 Mass Communication and Public Opinion.
    • ECON 340 International Economics
    • ECON 360 Developing Economies
    • ECON 370 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
    • ECON 398 Strategy and Equity
    • ECON 471 Environmental Economics
    • ECON 481 Government Revenues
    • ECON 482 Government Expenditures
    • ENVIRON 305 Society and Environment
    • ENVIRON 361 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
    • ENVIRON 375 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
    • ENVIRON 449 Organizational Theory and Change
    • HISTORY 476 American Business History
    • LHC 305 Legal Environ of Business
    • LHC 306 Law of Enterprise Organization
    • LHC 321 Corporate Social Responsibility
    • LHC 412 American Business History
    • LING 305 Advertising Rhetoric
    • MKT 300 Marketing Management I
    • MKT 301 Marketing Management II
    • MO 300 Behavior Theory in Management
    • MO 314 Managing Change
    • MO 315 Management of Personnel
    • MO 317 Interpersonal Processes and Teamwork
    • MO 322 Management-Union Relations
    • MO 324 Organizational Design
    • NRE 361 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
    • NRE 375 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
    • NRE 449 Organizational Theory and Change
    • NRE 571 Environmental Economics
    • ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics in Organizational Studies
    • ORGSTUDY 499 Independent Study
    • POLSCI 313 Political Mobilization and Policy Change
    • POLSCI 325 Mass Media and Political Behavior
    • POLSCI 360 Problems in World Politics
    • POLSCI 368 Cooperation and Conflict in the International System
    • POLSCI 369 Politics of International Economic Relations
    • POLSCI 486 Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups
    • PSYCH 385 Psychology of Environmental Stewardship
    • PSYCH 411 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    • PSYCH 467 Current Topics in Organizational Psychology
    • SOC 434 Social Organization of Black Communities
    • SOC 440 Sociology of Work
    • SOC 447 Sociology of Gender
    • SOC 452 Law and Social Psychology
    • SOC 454 Law and Social Organization
    • SOC 463 Mass Communication and Public Opinion
    • THTREMUS 385 Performing Arts Management
    • WOMENSTD 230 Women's Movements
    • WOMENSTD 419 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    • WOMENSTD 447 Sociology of Gender

Additional courses may on occasion be used as part of the plan for the major with written approval from the department advisor. Also, no more than six credits of upper-level independent study/experiential credit may count toward the major.

 

 

Honors Program

The Organizational Studies Honors Plan is designed to enable advanced undergraduate students to gain experience in the design, conduct, and analysis of research on organizations and organizational behavior. In the program, the Honors student will collaborate directly with a faculty mentor to complete an original research project. For students with strong academic records and an interest in research, the Honors program can serve as a capstone for undergraduate studies, and as important preparation for graduate studies or other future endeavors.

The Organizational Studies Honors Plan (OSHC) is focused solely on research skills and activities, and interested students should be certain that they have a serious interest in academic research and the capability and desire to complete a prolonged independent study project culminating in a major empirical research paper.

Overall Structure and Effort for Honors Plan

During the junior year, interested students must apply for and be accepted into the OSHC. The application must include a detailed research proposal, and be supported and signed by the faculty mentor. If admitted, the student will enroll in the OS Senior Honors Research sequence in the senior year (ORGSTUDY 497 & 498). These are independent study courses in which the student will work on research and a thesis with a faculty mentor.

For OSHC students, the Honors thesis will become the defining feature of the senior year. Completing an Honors research project requires a commitment of at least two terms working in an independent study format, meeting on a regular basis with a faculty mentor. A complete first draft of the thesis should be submitted to the faculty mentor early in the second semester of the project. The Honors student must submit the final thesis for evaluation by a faculty panel by March 10. The student will also present the research at the Organizational Studies Honors Symposium in late March. If the thesis is approved and LSA cumulative GPA requirements are met, an Honors designation will appear on the student s transcript and diploma.

Arrange Student-Faculty Collaboration on a Specific Project

Students interested in the OSHC should begin exploring research interests during the first semester of the junior year. By February 1 of the junior year, the student should identify a specific UM faculty member who has research interests similar to the student s own. The faculty mentor must be a tenure-track faculty member at the University of Michigan (may be non-LSA). Successful partnerships often result from projects that extend ongoing research by the faculty mentor, but an original student project is also possible. For the Honors project, student and faculty mentor agree to work as a team for two terms to design and complete an empirical study.

Formal Application to the OS Honors Plan

To qualify for the OSHC, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher, and must maintain it through graduation. To apply to the OSHC, an application including a project proposal that has been approved by the faculty mentor must be submitted. The proposal should be a minimum of 5 pages, and must include:

  • A brief overview of the project, including the research question to be answered;
  • An explanation of the research design, data collection methods or data source to be used (include IRB submission info);
  • A brief discussion of the analysis plan and expected results;
  • A list of relevant references to the literature;
  • An initial plan of work with a timeline.

Deadline for submitting OS Honors Plan application

Applications may be obtained at the OS Program office (713 Dennison) or on the OS website. Following submission of the OSHC application, the OS Program will schedule an "Evaluation and Feedback Session" that the student and faculty mentor will attend. The OS Honors Committee will ask questions about the proposal, and suggest any revisions. Following this session, the Committee will reach a decision on the proposal and notify the student and faculty mentor no later than April 15th. If approved, research may start in the summer if feasible.

Program Completion

An original research report (thesis) must be completed, in collaboration with the faculty mentor. The thesis must be formatted as a standard research journal submission, and is typically 30-40 pages in length. The Honors student must submit the final thesis to the faculty mentor by March 10, and also must present the findings at the OS Honors Symposium in late March.

Each thesis is evaluated by a faculty panel consisting of three readers: the faculty mentor, an independent faculty reader, and the OS Program Director. The independent faculty reader is chosen by the student and the faculty mentor, must be a tenure-track faculty member (may be non-LSA), and should be someone who has adequate knowledge of the research area but no previous connection to the project. The readers will complete their evaluation of the thesis by April 20.

To receive an Honors designation on the college degree, the faculty readers must approve the thesis, and the Honors student must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.50 at graduation.

Students interested in the Organizational Studies Honors Plan may obtain further information at the OS Program office (713 Dennison) or on the OS website

Organizational Studies Major (September 3, 2002 until end of Winter 2004 +

effective date September 3, 2002 until end of Winter Term, 2004

May be elected as an interdepartmental major

Prerequisites to major

 Students must complete one course in each of the following three areas:

  1. Introduction to Economics (ECON 101)
  2. Introduction to Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115)
  3. Introduction to Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195)

 

All students should be aware that additional prerequisites are required for many of the upper-level courses in the OS curriculum. Depending on their particular area of interest, students may wish to complete ECON 102 and/or entry-level courses in political science, communication studies, or women's studies as they prepare to apply to the OS Program.

Application. Students must apply for and be accepted into the major. Students are declared into the major by the department advisor only.

Application for the major can be submitted during the sophomore or junior year, but the sophomore year is highly recommended. It is preferred that applicants have all three prerequisites completed at the time of application. At a minimum, to be eligible to apply, you must have completed (with final grades showing) at least two of the three prerequisite courses, and be currently enrolled in the third. Admission is competitive and enrollment in the major will be limited to assure a high quality educational experience. Program faculty will make admission decisions based on overall grade point average at the time of application, with special attention given to grades in the three prerequisite courses, and a personal statement written by the applicant.

 

Requirements for the Major

The major requires a minimum of 38 credits, distributed as follows:

  1.  Core requirements. Two courses are required [6 credits]:
    • ORGSTUDY 305 Social Organization and Coordination
    • ORGSTUDY 310 Formal Organizations and Environments
  2.  Cluster A and B Requirement. Minimum of five courses total, across both clusters, with at least two courses in each cluster listed below. [15 credits minimum]. The cluster requirements are designed to provide disciplinary variety in the study of organizations, drawing on courses in a number of fields, and ranging across multiple levels of organizational analysis. Courses taken as ORGSTUDY 495 Special Topics may be included, when appropriate and in consultation with the department advisor, as a course in Core, Cluster A, Cluster B, or Cluster C.
    1.  Organizations and Individuals (Cluster A)
      • ANTHRCUL 330 Culture, Thought, and Meaning
      • ANTHRCUL 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
      • COMM 361 Mediated Communication
      • COMM 381 Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior
      • LING 305 Advertising Rhetoric
      • LING 370 Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
      • PHIL 443 Foundations of Rational Choice Theory
      • PSYCH 260 Organizational Psychology
      • PSYCH 280 Social Psychology
      • PSYCH 393 Political Psychology
      • PSYCH 449 Decision Processes
      • PSYCH 464 Group Processes
    2.  Organizations and Society (Cluster B):
      • ANTHRCUL 332 Social Forms
      • COMM 351 Structure and Function of Media Systems
      • COMM 371 Media, Culture, and Society
      • ECON 320 Survey of Labor Economics
      • ECON 330 American Industries
      • ECON 401 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
      • ECON 422 The Structure of Labor Markets
      • ECON 431 Industrial Organization and Performance
      • ECON 432 Government Regulation of Industry
      • ECON 491 History of the American Economy
      • HISTORY 491 History of the American Economy
      • POLSCI 300 Contemporary Political Issues
      • POLSCI 310 American Policy Processes
      • POLSCI 311 American Political Processes
      • POLSCI 317 Courts, Politics and Society
      • POLSCI 320 The American Chief Executive
      • POLSCI 322 Legislative Process
      • POLSCI 369 Politics of International Economic Relations
      • SOC 315 Economic Sociology
      • SOC 442 Occupations and Professions
      • SOC 420 Complex Organizations
      • SOC 460 Social Change
  3.  Field Research and Quantitative Skills Requirements: Analysis, Research and Practice in Organizations [8 credits]. The field research and quantitative skills requirement is designed to provide both quantitative analytic and experiential learning opportunities for research, analysis, and practice in a wide range of organizational settings. One course from each area required.
    1.  Quantitative Skills: One course from the following: SOC 210; STATS 350, 400 or 405; ECON 404 or 405.
    2.  Field Research: ORGSTUDY 410 Advanced Research Methods in Organizational Studies. Prior or concurrent enrollment in the quantitative skills requirement is strongly recommended.
  4.  Interest Cluster Courses (Cluster C): [minimum of 9 credits]
    • AMCULT 339 American Religious Movements
    • ANTHRCUL 339 American Religious Movements
    • ANTHRCUL 414 Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I
    • ANTHRCUL 439 Economic Anthropology and Development
    • CAAS 434 Social Organization of Black Communities
    • CAAS 444 Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I
    • CAAS 450 Law, Race, and the Historical Process I
    • CAAS 451 Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.
    • COMM 452 Media Law and Policy
    • COMM 485 Mass Communication and Public Opinion.
    • ECON 340 International Economics
    • ECON 370 Natural Resource Economics
    • ECON 451 Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems
    • ECON 453 The European Economy
    • ECON 454 Economics of Japan
    • ECON 455 Economics of the People's Republic of China
    • ECON 471 Environmental Economics
    • ECON 492 World Economic History
    • ENVIRON 449 Organizational Theory and Change
    • ENVIRON 495 Small Group, Organization, and Advocacy Planning
    • HISTORY 476 American Business History
    • LHC 412 American Business History
    • MATH 427 Retirement and other Employee Benefits
    • OB 300 Behavior Theory in Management
    • OB 314 Managing Change
    • OB 315 Management of Personnel
    • OB 317 Interpersonal Processes and Teamwork
    • OB 322 Management-Union Relations
    • OB 324 Organizational Design
    • ORGSTUDY 499 Independent Study
    • POLSCI 358 Politics of the European Union
    • POLSCI 486 Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups
    • PSYCH 411 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    • PSYCH 467 Current Topics in Organizational Psychology
    • SOC 428 Contemporary China
    • SOC 434 Social Organization of Black Communities
    • SOC 440 Sociology of Work
    • SOC 452 Law and Social Psychology
    • SOC 454 Law and Social Organization
    • SOC 463 Mass Communication and Public Opinion
    • THTREMUS 385 Performing Arts Management
    • WOMENSTD 230 Women's Movements
    • WOMENSTD 419 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context

Additional courses may on occasion be used as part of the plan for the major with written approval from the department advisor. Also, no more than six credits of upper-level independent study/experiential credit may count toward the major.

 

 

Honors Program

The Organizational Studies Honors Plan is designed to enable advanced undergraduate students to gain experience in the design, conduct, and analysis of research on organizations and organizational behavior. In the program, the Honors student will collaborate directly with a faculty mentor to complete an original research project. For students with strong academic records and an interest in research, the Honors program can serve as a capstone for undergraduate studies, and as important preparation for graduate studies or other future endeavors.

The Organizational Studies Honors Plan (OSHC) is focused solely on research skills and activities, and interested students should be certain that they have a serious interest in academic research and the capability and desire to complete a prolonged independent study project culminating in a major empirical research paper.

Overall Structure and Effort for Honors Plan

During the junior year, interested students must apply for and be accepted into the OSHC. The application must include a detailed research proposal, and be supported and signed by the faculty mentor. If admitted, the student will enroll in the OS Senior Honors Research sequence in the senior year (ORGSTUDY 497 & 498). These are independent study courses in which the student will work on research and a thesis with a faculty mentor.

For OSHC students, the Honors thesis will become the defining feature of the senior year. Completing an Honors research project requires a commitment of at least two terms working in an independent study format, meeting on a regular basis with a faculty mentor. A complete first draft of the thesis should be submitted to the faculty mentor early in the second semester of the project. The Honors student must submit the final thesis for evaluation by a faculty panel by March 10. The student will also present the research at the Organizational Studies Honors Symposium in late March. If the thesis is approved and LSA cumulative GPA requirements are met, an Honors designation will appear on the student s transcript and diploma.

Arrange Student-Faculty Collaboration on a Specific Project

Students interested in the OSCH should begin exploring research interests during the first semester of the junior year. By February 1 of the junior year, the student should identify a specific UM faculty member who has research interests similar to the student s own. The faculty mentor must be a tenure-track faculty member at the University of Michigan (may be non-LSA). Successful partnerships often result from projects that extend ongoing research by the faculty mentor, but an original student project is also possible. For the Honors project, student and faculty mentor agree to work as a team for two terms to design and complete an empirical study.

Formal Application to the OS Honors Plan

To qualify for the OSHC, students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher, and must maintain it through graduation. To apply to the OSHC, an application including a project proposal that has been approved by the faculty mentor must be submitted. The proposal should be a minimum of 5 pages, and must include:

  • A brief overview of the project, including the research question to be answered;
  • An explanation of the research design, data collection methods or data source to be used (include IRB submission info);
  • A brief discussion of the analysis plan and expected results;
  • A list of relevant references to the literature;
  • An initial plan of work with a timeline.

Deadline for submitting OS Honors Plan application

Applications may be obtained at the OS Program office (713 Dennison) or on the OS website. Following submission of the OSHC application, the OS Program will schedule an Evaluation and Feedback Session" that the student and faculty mentor will attend. The OS Honors Committee will ask questions about the proposal, and suggest any revisions. Following this session, the Committee will reach a decision on the proposal and notify the student and faculty mentor no later than April 15th. If approved, research may start in the summer if feasible.

Program Completion

An original research report (thesis) must be completed, in collaboration with the faculty mentor. The thesis must be formatted as a standard research journal submission, and is typically 30-40 pages in length. The Honors student must submit the final thesis to the faculty mentor by March 10, and also must present the findings at the OS Honors Symposium in late March.

Each thesis is evaluated by a faculty panel consisting of three readers: the faculty mentor; an independent faculty reader; and the OS Program Director. The independent faculty reader is chosen by the student and the faculty mentor, must be a tenure-track faculty member (may be non-LSA), and should be someone who has adequate knowledge of the research area but no previous connection to the project. The readers will complete their evaluation of the thesis by April 20.

To receive an Honors designation on the college degree, the faculty readers must approve the thesis, and the Honors student must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.50 at graduation.

Students interested in the Organizational Studies Honors Plan may obtain further information at the OS Program office (713 Dennison) or on the OS website.


Organizational Studies Major [September 5, 2001-September 3, 2002) +

 

Organizational Studies

May be elected as an interdepartmental major beginning September 5, 2001

Organizational Studies

Prerequisites to major

Students must complete the following three courses:

  1. Economics 101 Principles of Economics I
  2. Psychology 111 Introduction to Psychology
  3. Sociology 100 Principles of Sociology

Application. Students must apply for and be accepted into the major. Students are declared into the major by the department advisor only.

Application for the major will be made in the winter term of the sophomore year. Students should have completed or be enrolled in courses meeting prerequisites at the time of application. Admission will be competitive and enrollment in the major will be limited to assure a high quality educational experience. Program faculty will make admission decisions based on grade point in the overall transcript at the time of application with special attention to grades in the three prerequisite courses.

Requirements for the Major

The major requires a minimum of 39 credits, distributed as follows:

  1. Core requirements. Two courses are required from the three listed below. [Minimum 7 credits]
    • Economics 401 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
    • Psychology 360 Organizational Psychology
    • Sociology 420 Complex Organizations
  2. Cluster Requirement. Minimum of five courses total, across both clusters, with at least 2 courses in each cluster listed below. [15 credits minimum]. The cluster requirements are designed to provide disciplinary variety in the study of organizations, drawing on courses in a number of fields, and ranging across multiple levels of organizational analysis.
    1. Cluster A: Organizations and Individuals
      • Anthropology 330 Culture, Thought, and Meaning
      • Linguistics 305 Advertising Rhetoric
      • Communication 361 Mediated Communication
      • Psychology 380 Social Psychology
      • Psychology 464 Group Processes
      • Psychology 542 Decision Processes
    2. Cluster B: Organizations and Society
      • Economics 330 American Industries
      • Economics 431 Industrial Organization and Performance
      • Economics 432 Government Regulation of Industry
      • Economics 491 / History 491 History of the American Economy
      • History 491 / Economics 491 History of the American Economy
      • Sociology 415 Economic Sociology
      • Sociology 442 Occupations and Professions
      • Political Science 431 Public Administration
      • Political Science 463 International Organization and Integration
  3. Field Research and Quantitative Skills Requirements: Analysis, Research and Practice in Organizations [8 credits]. The field research and quantitative skills requirement is designed to provide both quantitative analytic and experiential learning opportunities for research, analysis, and practice in a wide range of organizational settings.
    1. Quantitative Skills: One course from the following: Sociology 210, Statistics 350 or 400, Economics 404
    2. Field Research: Psychology 361 Field Research in Organizations. Prior or concurrent enrollment in the quantitative skills requirement is strongly recommended.
  4. Electives [minimum of 9 credits]
    • Afroamerican and African Studies 329 African American Leadership
    • Afroamerican Studies 450 Law, Race, and the Historical Process I
    • Economics 451 Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems
    • Economics 453 The European Economy
    • Economics 454 Economics of Japan
    • Economics 455 Economics of the People's Republic of China
    • History 569 / LHC 412 American Business History
    • Math 427 / Human Behavior 603 Retirement and other Employee Benefits
    • Organizational Behavior 314 Managing Change
    • Organizational Behavior 315 Management of Personnel
    • Organizational Behavior 317 Interpersonal Processes and Teamwork
    • Organizational Behavior 322 Management-Union Relations
    • Organizational Behavior 324 Organizational Design
    • Psychology 561 Advanced Topics in Organizational Psychology
    • Sociology 440 Sociology of Work
    • Sociology 452 Law and Social Psychology
    • Sociology 454 Law and Social Organization
    • Theater & Drama 385 Performing Arts Management
    • Women's Studies 419 Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
    • Women's Studies 230 Women's Movements
    • Women's Studies 342 Gender and Society: Hierarchies in Social Organization

 


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