RC academic minors

University of Michigan students interested in Residential College programs and courses should contact the RC Academic Services Office (134 Tyler, East Quadrangle, 763-0032) or visit in person. Others should contact the RC Admissions Office, 133 Tyler, East Quadrangle, 763-0176.

RC academic minors are open to all LSA students

Students wishing to pursue an RC academic minor must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with each program's designated advisor. Appointments may be scheduled at the RC Academic Services Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad, or by calling (734) 763-0032.

Crime and Justice Minor

Not a major program

Effective Date: Fall 2014

A minor in Crime and Justice is not open to students pursuing a major in the Department of Sociology nor to students majoring in Social Theory and Practice in the RC.  
Students electing the Crime and Justice minor may not declare a minor in Law, Justice, and Social Change (Department of Sociology).

The past thirty years have seen a dramatic increase in prison populations — fueled by the centrality of crime and fear of crime to American politics. This minor melds concepts from the history of crime and criminal law, theories of crime and punishment, and societal circumstances that propel unequal demographics of criminality.

Students wishing to pursue a minor in Crime and Justice must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the program's designated advisor. Appointments may be scheduled at the RC Academic Services Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad, or by calling (734) 763-0032.

Prerequisites to the Minor

None for the Academic minor per se, although individual courses elected to meet the requirements of the minor may have course prerequisites.

Academic Minor Program

A minimum of five courses (at least 15 credits), to be elected from categories as stated:

  1. Core Course: SOC 368. Criminology
  2. Electives. One course from each of the following three areas (at least two of which must be at the 300-level and above).
    No more than three courses may be selected from any single department or program.
    1. Contexts and Social Perspectives on the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • AAS 262 / HISTORY 272: The Modern Civil Rights Movement
      • AAS 303 / SOC 303: Race and Ethnic Relations
      • AAS 322 / ENVIRON 335: Introduction to Environmental Politics: Race, Class and Gender
      • AAS 324: Dealing with the Past : Doing Justice in Africa: South Africa, Rwanda, Sierra Leone
      • AAS 330 / RCSSCI 330: Urban and Community Studies, I
      • AAS 334 / AMCULT 336: Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America
      • AAS 420 / ANTHRCUL 347: Race and Ethnicity
      • AAS 426 Urban Redevelopment and Social Justice
      • AAS 434 / SOC 434: Social Organization of Black Communities
      • AAS 454 / ANTHRCUL 453 African-American Culture
      • AMCULT 304 / SOC 304: American Immigration
      • AMCULT 336 / AAS 334: Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America
      • AMCULT 337: A Survey of American Blues Music
      • AMCULT 369 / HISTORY 369: U.S. Mass Culture from Minstrelsy to Hip Hop
      • AMCULT 374 / HISTORY 374: Politics and Culture of the “Sixties”
      • AMCULT 399: Race in America
      • AMCULT 421 / SOC 423: Stratification
      • ANTHRCUL 347 / AAS 420: Race and Ethnicity
      • ANTHRCUL 453 / AAS 454 African-American Culture
      • ARCH 357 / UP 357 Architecture, Sustainability, and the City: Ideas, Force, and People Shaping the Built Environment
      • CEE 307 / ENVIRON 407: Sustainable Cities
      • COMM 318 / PSYCH 318: Media and Violence
      • ENVIRON 222: Introduction to Environmental Justice
      • ENVIRON 335 / AAS 322: Introduction to Environmental Politics: Race, Class and Gender
      • ENVIRON 407 / CEE 307: Sustainable Cities
      • ENVIRON 408: Land Use Policy, Law, and the Environment
      • HISTORY 272 / AAS 262: The Modern Civil Rights Movement
      • HISTORY 369 / AMCULT 369: U.S. Mass Culture from Minstrelsy to Hip Hop
      • HISTORY 374 / AMCULT 374: Politics and Culture of the “Sixties”
      • HISTORY 375 / WOMENSTD 375: History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective
      • PHIL 224: Global Justice
      • PHIL 355: Contemporary Moral Problems
      • POLSCI 307: Topics in American Political Thought
      • POLSCI 319 Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
      • PSYCH 318 / COMM 318: Media and Violence
      • RCSSCI 330 / AAS 330: Urban and Community Studies, I
      • SOC 303 / AAS 303: Race and Ethnic Relations
      • SOC 304 / AMCULT 304: American Immigration
      • SOC 423 / AMCULT 421: Stratification
      • SOC 434 / AAS 434: Social Organization of Black Communities
      • SOC 435: Urban Inequality and Conflict
      • UP 357 / ARCH 357 Architecture, Sustainability, and the City: Ideas, Force, and People Shaping the Built Environment
      • WOMENSTD 375 / HISTORY 375: History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective
    2. Disciplinary Studies of the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • AAS 248: Crime, Race, and the Law
      • AAS 450 / 451: Law, Race and the Historical Process I, II
      • ANTHRCUL 333: Non-Western Legal Systems
      • ANTHRCUL 428 / WOMENSTD 428 / RCSSCI 428: Sex Panics in the U.S. and UK since 1890
      • COMM 425: Internet, Society, and the Law
      • HISTORY 256 / JUDAIC 265: Introduction to Jewish Law: Sources, Legal History, and Legal Theory
      • HISTORY 257 / JUDAIC 257: Law in the Pre-modern World
      • HISTORY 345 / RCSSCI 357: History and Theory of Punishment
      • HISTORY 477: Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change
      • HISTORY 496: History Colloquium (appropriate topics may count, with permission)
      • HISTORY 497: History Colloquium (section titled “War on Crime / War on Drugs”; other appropriate topics may count, with permission)
      • JUDAIC 257 / HISTORY 257: Law in the Pre-modern World
      • JUDAIC 265 / HISTORY 256: Introduction to Jewish Law: Sources, Legal History, and Legal Theory
      • PHIL 359: Law and Philosophy
      • POLSCI 364: Public International Law
      • PSYCH 488 / SOC 465 / WOMENSTD 465: Sociological Analysis of Deviance
      • RCSSCI 357 / HISTORY 345: History and Theory of Punishment
      • RCSSCI 428 / ANTHRCUL 428 / WOMENSTD 428: Sex Panics in the U.S. and UK since 1890
      • SOC 270 / WOMENSTD 270: Gender and the Law
      • SOC 454: Law and Society
      • SOC 465 / PSYCH 488 / WOMENSTD 465: Sociological Analysis of Deviance
      • WOMENSTD 270 / SOC 270: Gender and the Law
      • WOMENSTD 428 / ANTHRCUL 428 / RCSSCI 428: Sex Panics in the U.S. and UK since 1890
      • WOMENSTD 465 / PSYCH 488 / SOC 465: Sociological Analysis of Deviance
    3. Direct Encounters with the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • ARTDES 312: Art Workshops in Prison
      • PSYCH 211: Project Outreach (appropriate sections)
      • RCCORE 301: Community-Based Internship – Semester in Detroit (appropriate placements)
        and
        RCCORE 302: Community-Based Internship Reflection Seminar
      • RCCORE 334: Special Topics (section titled “The Atonement Project”)
      • RCHUMS 334: Special Topics in the Humanities (section titled “Theater and Incarceration”)
      • THTREMUS 399: Topics in Drama (section titled “The Atonement Project”)

 

Crime and Justice Minor (Winter 2014-Summer 2014) +

Crime and Justice

Not a major program

effective Winter 2014-Summer 2014

A minor in Crime and Justice is not open to students pursuing a major in the Department of Sociology nor to students majoring in Social Theory and Practice in the RC.  

The past thirty years have seen a dramatic increase in prison populations — fueled by the centrality of crime and fear of crime to American politics. This minor melds concepts from the history of crime and criminal law, theories of crime and punishment, and societal circumstances that propel unequal demographics of criminality.

Students wishing to pursue a minor in Crime and Justice must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the program's designated advisor. Appointments may be scheduled at the RC Academic Services Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad, or by calling (734) 763-0032.

Prerequisites to the Minor

None for the Academic minor per se, although individual courses elected to meet the requirements of the minor may have course prerequisites.

Academic Minor Program

A minimum of five courses (at least 15 credits), to be elected from categories as stated:

  1. Core Course: SOC 368. Criminology
  2. Electives. One course from each of the following three areas (at least two of which must be at the 300-level and above).
    No more than three courses may be selected from any single department or program.

    1. Contexts and Social Perspectives on the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • AAS 262 / HISTORY 272: The Modern Civil Rights Movement
      • AAS 303 / SOC 303: Race and Ethnic Relations
      • AAS 322 / ENVIRON 335: Introduction to Environmental Politics: Race, Class and Gender
      • AAS 324: Dealing with the Past : Doing Justice in Africa: South Africa, Rwanda, Sierra Leone
      • AAS 330 / RCSSCI 330: Urban and Community Studies, I
      • AAS 334 / AMCULT 336: Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America
      • AAS 420 / ANTHRCUL 347: Race and Ethnicity
      • AAS 426 Urban Redevelopment and Social Justice
      • AAS 434 / SOC 434: Social Organization of Black Communities
      • AAS 454 / ANTHRCUL 453 African-American Culture
      • AMCULT 304 / SOC 304: American Immigration
      • AMCULT 336 / AAS 334: Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America
      • AMCULT 337: A Survey of American Blues Music
      • AMCULT 369 / HISTORY 369: U.S. Mass Culture from Minstrelsy to Hip Hop
      • AMCULT 374 / HISTORY 374: Politics and Culture of the “Sixties”
      • AMCULT 399: Race in America
      • AMCULT 421 / SOC 423: Stratification
      • ANTHRCUL 347 / AAS 420: Race and Ethnicity
      • ANTHRCUL 453 / AAS 454 African-American Culture
      • ARCH 357 / UP 357 Architecture, Sustainability, and the City: Ideas, Force, and People Shaping the Built Environment
      • CEE 307 / ENVIRON 407: Sustainable Cities
      • COMM 318 / PSYCH 318: Media and Violence
      • ENVIRON 222: Introduction to Environmental Justice
      • ENVIRON 335 / AAS 322: Introduction to Environmental Politics: Race, Class and Gender
      • ENVIRON 407 / CEE 307: Sustainable Cities
      • ENVIRON 408: Land Use Policy, Law, and the Environment
      • HISTORY 272 / AAS 262: The Modern Civil Rights Movement
      • HISTORY 369 / AMCULT 369: U.S. Mass Culture from Minstrelsy to Hip Hop
      • HISTORY 374 / AMCULT 374: Politics and Culture of the “Sixties”
      • HISTORY 375 / WOMENSTD 375: History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective
      • PHIL 224: Global Justice
      • PHIL 355: Contemporary Moral Problems
      • POLSCI 307: Topics in American Political Thought
      • POLSCI 319 Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
      • PSYCH 318 / COMM 318: Media and Violence
      • RCSSCI 330 / AAS 330: Urban and Community Studies, I
      • SOC 303 / AAS 303: Race and Ethnic Relations
      • SOC 304 / AMCULT 304: American Immigration
      • SOC 423 / AMCULT 421: Stratification
      • SOC 434 / AAS 434: Social Organization of Black Communities
      • SOC 435: Urban Inequality and Conflict
      • UP 357 / ARCH 357 Architecture, Sustainability, and the City: Ideas, Force, and People Shaping the Built Environment
      • WOMENSTD 375 / HISTORY 375: History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective
    2. Disciplinary Studies of the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • AAS 248: Crime, Race, and the Law
      • AAS 450 / 451: Law, Race and the Historical Process I, II
      • ANTHRCUL 333: Non-Western Legal Systems
      • ANTHRCUL 428 / WOMENSTD 428 / RCSSCI 428: Sex Panics in the U.S. and UK since 1890
      • COMM 425: Internet, Society, and the Law
      • HISTORY 256 / JUDAIC 265: Introduction to Jewish Law: Sources, Legal History, and Legal Theory
      • HISTORY 257 / JUDAIC 257: Law in the Pre-modern World
      • HISTORY 345 / RCSSCI 357: History and Theory of Punishment
      • HISTORY 477: Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change
      • HISTORY 496: History Colloquium (appropriate topics may count, with permission)
      • HISTORY 497: History Colloquium (section titled “War on Crime / War on Drugs”; other appropriate topics may count, with permission)
      • JUDAIC 257 / HISTORY 257: Law in the Pre-modern World
      • JUDAIC 265 / HISTORY 256: Introduction to Jewish Law: Sources, Legal History, and Legal Theory
      • PHIL 359: Law and Philosophy
      • POLSCI 364: Public International Law
      • PSYCH 488 / SOC 465 / WOMENSTD 465: Sociological Analysis of Deviance
      • RCSSCI 357 / HISTORY 345: History and Theory of Punishment
      • RCSSCI 428 / ANTHRCUL 428 / WOMENSTD 428: Sex Panics in the U.S. and UK since 1890
      • SOC 270 / WOMENSTD 270: Gender and the Law
      • SOC 454: Law and Society
      • SOC 465 / PSYCH 488 / WOMENSTD 465: Sociological Analysis of Deviance
      • WOMENSTD 270 / SOC 270: Gender and the Law
      • WOMENSTD 428 / ANTHRCUL 428 / RCSSCI 428: Sex Panics in the U.S. and UK since 1890
      • WOMENSTD 465 / PSYCH 488 / SOC 465: Sociological Analysis of Deviance
    3. Direct Encounters with the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • ARTDES 312: Art Workshops in Prison
      • PSYCH 211: Project Outreach (appropriate sections)
      • RCCORE 301: Community-Based Internship – Semester in Detroit (appropriate placements)
        and
        RCCORE 302: Community-Based Internship Reflection Seminar
      • RCCORE 334: Special Topics (section titled “The Atonement Project”)
      • RCHUMS 334: Special Topics in the Humanities (section titled “Theater and Incarceration”)
      • SOC 225 (or 389): Practicum in Sociology (appropriate sections of Project Community)
      • THTREMUS 399: Topics in Drama (section titled “The Atonement Project”)

 

Crime and Justice Minor (Fall 2012-Fall 2013) +

Crime and Justice

Not a major program

Effective Date: Fall 2012-Fall 2013

A minor in Crime and Justice is not open to students pursuing a major in the Department of Sociology nor to students majoring in Social Theory and Practice in the RC.  

The past thirty years have seen a dramatic increase in prison populations — fueled by the centrality of crime and fear of crime to American politics. This minor melds concepts from the history of crime and criminal law, theories of crime and punishment, and societal circumstances that propel unequal demographics of criminality.

Students wishing to pursue a minor in Crime and Justice must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the program's designated advisor. Appointments may be scheduled at the RC Academic Services Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad, or by calling (734) 763-0032.

Prerequisites to the Minor

None for the Academic minor per se, although individual courses elected to meet the requirements of the minor may have course prerequisites.

Academic Minor Program

A minimum of five courses (at least 15 credits), to be elected from categories as stated:

  1. Core Course: SOC 368. Criminology
  2. Electives. One course from each of the following three areas (at least two of which must be at the 300-level and above).
    1. Contexts and Social Perspectives on the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • CAAS 324, 420, 426, 434, 450, 451
      • AMCULT 421
      • ANTHRCUL 347
      • COMM 481
      • ECON 325
      • ENVIRON 222
      • HISTORY 375
      • PHIL 224
      • POLSCI 332
      • PSYCH 481
      • SOC 423, 434
      • WOMENSTD 375
    2. Disciplinary Studies of the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • ANTHRCUL 333, 428
      • CAAS 248
      • ECON 327
      • HISTORY 257, 345, 397 (section subtitled "Penal Colonies and Camp Cultures" and "War on Crime/War on Drugs"), 477
      • PHIL 359, 366
      • POLSCI 317
      • PSYCH 488
      • RCSSCI 357, 428
      • SOC 454, 465
      • WOMENSTD 428
    3. Direct Encounters with the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • ENGLISH 310 and 319 (sections taught by Prof. Alexander), 411 (section subtitled "Prison and the Artist")
      • PSYCH 211* (appropriate sections)
      • SOC 389* (appropriate sections).


        * Only sections that place students in juvenile facilities, adult prisons, or community supervision programs will be allowed to count in the minor.

Crime and Justice Academic Minor (Winter 2011-Summer 2012) +

Crime and Justice

Not a concentration program

Effective Date: Winter 2011-Summer 2012

An academic minor in Crime and Justice is not open to students pursuing a concentration in the Department of Sociology nor to students concentrating in Social Theory and Practice in the RC. 

The past thirty years have seen a dramatic increase in prison populations - fueled by the centrality of crime and fear of crime to American politics. This academic minor melds concepts from the history of crime and criminal law, theories of crime and punishment, and societal circumstances that propel unequal demographics of criminality.

Students wishing to pursue an academic minor in Crime and Justice must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the program's designated advisor. Appointments may be scheduled at the RC Academic Services Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad, or by calling (734) 763-0032.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor

None for the Academic minor per se, although individual courses elected to meet the requirements of the academic minor may have course prerequisites.

Academic Minor Program

A minimum of five courses (at least 15 credits), to be elected from categories as stated:

  1. Core Course: SOC 368. Criminology
  2. Electives. One course from each of the following three areas (at least two of which must be at the 300-level and above).
    1. Contexts and Social Perspectives on the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • CAAS 324, 420, 426, 434, 450, 451
      • AMCULT 421
      • ANTHRCUL 347
      • COMM 481
      • ECON 325
      • ENVIRON 222
      • HISTORY 375
      • PHIL 224
      • POLSCI 332
      • PSYCH 481
      • SOC 423, 434
      • WOMENSTD 375
    2. Disciplinary Studies of the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • ANTHRCUL 333, 428
      • CAAS 248
      • ECON 327
      • HISTORY 257, 345, 397 (section subtitled "Penal Colonies and Camp Cultures" and "War on Crime/War on Drugs"), 477
      • PHIL 359, 366
      • POLSCI 317
      • PSYCH 488
      • RCSSCI 357, 428
      • SOC 454, 465
      • WOMENSTD 428
    3. Direct Encounters with the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • ENGLISH 310 and 319 (sections taught by Prof. Alexander), 411 (section subtitled "Prison and the Artist")
      • PSYCH 211* (appropriate sections)
      • SOC 389* (appropriate sections).


        * Only sections that place students in juvenile facilities, adult prisons, or community supervision programs will be allowed to count in the academic minor.

Crime and Justice Academic Minor (Fall 2004 through Fall 2010) +

 

Crime and Justice

Not a concentration program

Effective Date: 9/21/04 through Fall 2010

An academic minor in Crime and Justice is not open to students pursuing a concentration in the Department of Sociology nor to students concentrating in Social Sciences in the RC.

The past thirty years have seen a dramatic increase in prison populations--fueled by the centrality of crime and fear of crime to American politics. This minor melds concepts from the history of crime and criminal law, theories of crime and punishment, and societal circumstances that propel unequal demographics of criminality.

Students wishing to pursue an academic minor in Crime and Justice must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the program's designated advisor. Appointments may be scheduled at the RC Academic Services Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad, or by calling (734) 763-0032.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor:

None for the Academic Minor per se, although individual courses elected to meet the requirements of the Academic Minor may have course prerequisites.

Academic Minor Program:

A minimum of five courses (at least 15 credits), to be elected from categories as stated:

  1. Core Courses

    1. SOC 368. Criminology

    2. RCSSCI 357/HISTORY 345. The History and Theory of Punishment.

  2. Electives.

    One course from each of the following three areas (at least two of which must be at the 300-level and above).

    1. Contexts and Social Perspectives on the Problems of Crime and Punishment

      • CAAS 303, 426, 434, 450, 451
      • AMCULT 102 (section subtitled "Politics and Culture of Race in Post-1945 U.S."), 421, 464
      • COMM 481
      • ECON 325
      • HISTORY 344, 464
      • POLSCI 332
      • HISTORY 196 (section subtitled "Politics and Culture of Race in Post-1945 U.S."), 375, 396 (section subtitled "Gender and Justice in the U.S.")
      • Residential College
        • RCSSCI 280, 344
      • SOC 231, 303, 423, 434, 435
      • WOMENSTD 375.
    2. Disciplinary Studies of the Problems of Crime and Punishment

      • ANTHRCUL 333
      • ECON 327
      • HISTORY 475, 477
      • PHIL 359, 355
      • POLSCI 317, 432
      • PSYCH 488
      • RCSSCI 356, 360 (section subtitled "Sex Panics"), 460 (section subtitled "The Ideal of Universal Law")
      • SOC 452, 454, 465
      • WOMENSTD 270, 333.
    3. Direct Encounters with the Problems of Crime and Punishment
      • ENGLISH 310 and 319 (sections taught by Prof. Alexander), 411 (section subtitled "Prison and the Artist")
      • PSYCH 211 (appropriate sections*)
      • SOC 389 (appropriate sections*)

        * Only sections that place students in juvenile facilities, adult prisons, or community supervision programs will be allowed to count in the academic minor

Crime and Justice Academic Minor (Effective until Sept 20, 2004) +

Effective until Sept 20, 2004 

An academic minor in Crime and Justice is not open to students pursuing a concentration in the Department of Sociology nor to students concentrating in Social Sciences in the RC. Students wishing to pursue an academic minor in Crime and Justice must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the program's designated advisor. Appointments may be scheduled at the RC Academic Services Office, 134 Tyler, East Quad, or by calling 763-0032.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor: None for the Academic Minor per se, although individual courses elected to meet the requirements of the Academic Minor may have course prerequisites.

Academic Minor Program: A minimum of 5 courses (at least 15 credits), to be elected from categories as stated:

  1. Core Courses

    1. SOC 368. Criminology

    2. RCSSCI 357/HISTORY 345. The History and Theory of Punishment

  2. Electives. One course from each of the following three areas (at least two of which must be at the 300-level and above).

    1. Contexts and Social Perspectives on the Problems of Crime and Punishment

      • CAAS 426, 434, 451

      • AMCULT 102 (section subtitled "Politics and Culture of Race in Post-1945 U.S.")

      • COMM 481

      • ECON 325

      • POLSCI 332

      • HISTORY 196 (section subtitled "Politics and Culture of Race in Post-1945 U.S."), 375, 396 (section subtitled "Gender and Justice in the U.S.")

      • SOC 231, 434

      • WOMENSTD 375

    2. Disciplinary Studies of the Problems of Crime and Punishment

      • ANTHRCUL 333

      • ECON 327

      • HIST 582

      • PHIL 359

      • POLSCI 317

      • PSYCH 488

      • RCSSCI 356, 460 (section subtitled "The Ideal of Universal Law")

      • SOC 452, 454, 465

      • WOMENSTD 270, 483 (section subtitled "Women in Prison")

    3. Direct Encounters with the Problems of Crime and Punishment

      • ENGLISH 310 and 319 (sections taught by Prof. Alexander), 411 (section subtitled "Prison and the Artist")

      • PSYCH 211 (appropriate sections*)

      • SOC 389 (appropriate sections*)

*Only sections that place students in juvenile facilitIes, adult prisons, or community supervision programs will be allowed to count in the academic minor.


College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI  48109 © 2014 Regents of the University of Michigan