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 The Polish Program at the University of Michigan is considered one of the strongest, possibly the strongest, Polish programs in the country. Language courses are the core, with offerings including First, Second, Third, and Fourth Year Polish. U-M is thus the only American university to offer four levels of Polish every year. It also offers on a regular basis Polish literature survey courses, as well as courses on Polish drama, novel , film, and popular culture. People of Polish heritage form the fourth largest ethnic group in the state of Michigan, and a great number of students at the University of Michigan have Polish roots. The strength of the program has been possible thanks to intensive cooperation with the Center of Russian and East European Studies. The Center actively supports Polish activities across the campus and helps coordinate a large network of faculty that include in their teaching and research different aspects of Polish culture. The Polish program also benefits from the activities of the Copernicus Endowment, most notably its annual Copernicus Lectures delivering leading Polish scholars, artists, writers, and public figures.

The concentration is intended for undergraduates who have in interest in Polish language and culture for academic, cultural, or frequently heritage reasons. It will appeal to students who are contemplating professional, scholarly, or business careers that will involve work in Poland. Its goal is to give interested students a solid base in Polish language and culture, knowledge they can apply in a future academic and/or professional career. It aims to enable research and day-to-day communication, at the same time that it provides competence in salient aspects of Polish literature and culture.

In addition to the concentration, the department offers an academic minor in Polish Language, Literature, and Culture.

Polish Major

Effective Winter 2013

May be elected as a departmental major

Prerequisites to the Major

POLISH 121, 122, 221, and 222, or the equivalent. 

Requirements for the Major

(27 credits). At least 15 of the 27 credits must be upper-level (300 or above).

  1. Polish Language: 6-12 credits of POLISH 321, 322, 421, 422; or equivalent
  2. Polish Literature: 6-9 credits of POLISH 325, 326, 432
  3. Polish Culture: 6-9 credits of POLISH 214, 215, 314, 450, SLAVIC 490*
  4. Electives. 3-9 credits of:
    •   SLAVIC 225, 240, 270, 312, 396, 490* (Polish topics);
    •   HISTORY 330, 331
    •   REEES 396

*    (appropriate sections of SLAVIC 490 include “Rocks Kill Communism” and “Revolution in the Attic”)

Up to two terms of another Slavic language (Bosnian / Croatian / Serbian, Czech, Russian, Ukrainian); see department for additional course options). 

Residence Requirement.  At least 15 of the 27 required credits must be taken in residence or through a study abroad program affiliated with the University of Michigan. 

Study Abroad credit my count toward the major.  Please consult with the Polish advisor prior to studying abroad.

 

Polish Major (Winter 2010-Fall 2012) +

May be elected as a departmental major

Effective  (Winter 2010-Fall 2012

Prerequisites to the Major

 POLISH 121, 122, 221, and 222, or the equivalent. 

Requirements for the Major

1.   Core Courses (12 credits): POLISH 321 and 322, or 421 and 422; POLISH 325, 326

2.   Electives (15 credits):

  •   HISTORY 330, 331, 482
  •   POLISH 314, 432
  •   POLISH 450 (up to 3 credits)
  •   REEES 396
  •   SLAVIC 225, 240, 270, 312, 396, 490 (Polish topics);
  •   Two terms of another Slavic language (Bosnian / Croatian / Serbian, Czech, Russian, Ukrainian)

3.   Study Abroad Option: students may satisfy up to 4 credits of the electives through a Study Abroad program in Poland.

Caution: While experience in the country of the student's major is invaluable, academic courses for foreign students in Poland tend to be less rigorous in their content and requirements than courses at the U‑M. In order to receive credit for courses taken at a Polish university, students need to present – upon their return – course syllabi as well as samples of final examinations and requirements; they will be evaluated by the faculty in charge of the Polish program.

Honors Plan. Undergraduate majors who have maintained a 3.5 grade point average in Polish courses and 3.4 overall GPA may apply for admission to the Honors major. In addition to regular requirements for the major, qualified Honors majors work on a major project during the senior year, and complete an Honors thesis based on their research.

 

Polish major (Fall 2007 - Fall 2009) +

Effective Fall 2007 - Fall 2009 |

May be elected as a departmental major

The Polish Program at the University of Michigan is considered one of the strongest, possibly the strongest, Polish programs in the country. Language courses are the core, with offerings including First, Second, Third, and Fourth Year Polish. U-M is thus the only American university to offer four levels of Polish every year. It also offers on a regular basis Polish literature survey courses, as well as courses on Polish drama, novel , film, and popular culture. People of Polish heritage form the fourth largest ethnic group in the state of Michigan, and a great number of students at the University of Michigan have Polish roots. The strength of the program has been possible thanks to intensive cooperation with the Center of Russian and East European Studies. The Center actively supports Polish activities across the campus and helps coordinate a large network of faculty that include in their teaching and research different aspects of Polish culture. The Polish program also benefits from the activities of the Copernicus Endowment, most notably its annual Copernicus Lectures delivering leading Polish scholars, artists, writers, and public figures.

The major is intended for undergraduates who have in interest in Polish language and culture for academic, cultural, or frequently heritage reasons. It will appeal to students who are contemplating professional, scholarly, or business careers that will involve work in Poland. Its goal is to give students interested a solid base in Polish language and culture, knowledge they can apply in a future academic and/or professional career. It aims to enable research and day-to-day communication, at the same time that it provides competence in salient aspects of Polish literature and culture.

In addition to the major, the department offers a minor in Polish Language, Literature, and Culture.

Prerequisites to the Major

POLISH 121, 122, 221, and 222, or the equivalent.

Requirements for the Major

1.   Core Courses (12 credits): POLISH 321 and 322 or 421 and 422; POLISH 325, 326

2.   Electives (15 credits):

  • HISTORY 330, 331, 482
  • POLISH 314, 432
  • POLISH 450 or 451 (up to 3 credits)
  • REES 396
  • SLAVIC 225, 240, 270, 312, 396, 490 (Polish topics);
  • Two terms of another Slavic language (Bosnian / Croatian / Serbian, Czech, Russian, Ukrainian)

3.   Study Abroad Option: students may satisfy up to 4 credits of the electives through a Study Abroad program in Poland.

Caution: While experience in the country of the student's major is invaluable, academic courses for foreign students in Poland tend to be less rigorous in their content and requirements than courses at the UM. In order to receive credit for courses taken at a Polish university, students need to present - upon their return - course syllabi as well as samples of final examinations and requirements; they will be evaluated by the faculty in charge of the Polish program.

Honors Plan. Undergraduate majors who have maintained a 3.5 grade point average in Polish courses and 3.4 overall GPA may apply for admission to the Honors major. In addition to regular requirements for the major, qualified Honors majors work on a major project during the senior year, and complete an Honors thesis based on their research.

 


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