Minor: Czech Language, Literature, and Culture

Slavic Languages and Literatures Academic Minors

Academic minors in Slavic Languages and Literatures are not open to those electing a concentration or any other academic minor in the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, nor to those electing a concentration in the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REES). Students may concurrently pursue an academic minor in both REES and Slavic with the following restrictions:

  1. REES minors may not count any courses for which Slavic is the home unit
  2. Slavic minors may not count REES 397 or any courses for which REES is the home unit, which includes SLAVIC 395 and 396.

Students wishing to pursue an academic minor in the Department of  Slavic Languages and Literatures must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the department's designated advisor.

Appointments are scheduled online at www.lsa.umich.edu/slavic/undergraduate/advising

Czech Academic Minor

Effective Fall 2012; course list additions Winter 2014

The  minor Czech is not open to those electing any other minor in the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Students may concurrently pursue a minor in both REES and Slavic with the following restrictions: REES minors may not count any courses for which Slavic is the home unit Slavic minors may not count REES 397 or any courses for which REES is the home unit, which includes SLAVIC 395 and 396.

The  minor in Czech Language, Literature, and Culture is designed to give students a fundamental competence in Czech language upon which they can build, as well as a knowledge of some of the major cultural achievements and individual masterpieces of Czech literature and cinema.

The intended audience comprises all undergraduates with substantial interest in Czech studies. Such students might include those who envision doing professional work in the Czech Republic, those intending to pursue graduate work in areas related to Czech culture and society, as well as those who may wish to learn more about their own heritage.

The  minor presents the opportunity to gain basic competence in Czech language, upon which one can build toward whatever higher level of proficiency one requires. Furthermore, the minor gives students exposure to and knowledge of the work of some of the major figures in Czech culture, including such internationally acclaimed authors as Jaroslav Hašek, Karel Capek, and Milan Kundera, as well as the Nobel Prize winning poet Jaroslav Seifert. The ways in which Czech culture met the challenges of World War II, and of the subsequent forty years of Communist rule, is given major emphasis in several of the courses. Students may also learn about the important contributions of Czech filmmakers to world culture. Thus, the minor will have substantial value for all students who have an intellectual interest in Czech culture, even in cases where Czech studies do not figure directly in the student's career plans. This might be the case particularly for students who trace part of their own family heritage to the Czech lands. Finally, several of the courses address question about ethnic discriminations as they have been dealt with in literature and film, a feature which would deepen students' understanding through the comparative perspective it would provide.

Prerequisites to the Minor

CZECH 241 or equivalent.

Requirements for the Minor

16 credits of courses, including CZECH 242 (4 credits) and 12 credits in courses selected from the following two categories, with at least 6 credits from category B.

Category A: Courses on Central European Slavic Culture (no more than 6 credits from Category A may count in the  minor):

  • SLAVIC 225 (Arts and Cultures of Central Europe)
  • SLAVIC 312 (Central European Cinema)
  • SLAVIC 423 (Central European Literature in the Twentieth Century)

Students may count up to 3 credits of Third-Year Czech (CZECH 341 and 342) toward the  minor.

Category B: Courses on Czech culture, literature, and cinema (at least 6 credits are required from Category B):

  • CZECH 315 (Czech Cinema)
  • CZECH 480 (Supervised Czech Reading)
  • CZECH 483 (Czech Literature from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment)
  • CZECH 484 (Modern Czech Literature)
  • SLAVIC 470 (Topics in Cultural Studies of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe) (appropriate sections)
  • SLAVIC 490 (Issues of the Cultures of Eastern Europe) (appropriate sections)

Czech Language, Literature, and Culture Minor (FALL 1999-SUMMER 2012) +

 

 Minors in Slavic Languages and Literatures are not open to those electing a major or any other  minor in the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, nor to those electing a major in the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REES). Students may concurrently pursue a minor in both REES and Slavic with the following restrictions:

  1. REES minors may not count any courses for which Slavic is the home unit
  2. Slavic minors may not count REES 397 or any courses for which REES is the home unit, which includes SLAVIC 395 and 396.

CZECH  MINOR

Effective Fall 1999-Summer 2012

The academic minor in Czech Language, Literature, and Culture is designed to give students a fundamental competence in Czech language upon which they can build, as well as a knowledge of some of the major cultural achievements and individual masterpieces of Czech literature and cinema.

The intended audience comprises all undergraduates with substantial interest in Czech studies. Such students might include those who envision doing professional work in the Czech Republic, those intending to pursue graduate work in areas related to Czech culture and society, as well as those who may wish to learn more about their own heritage.

The academic minor presents the opportunity to gain basic competence in Czech language, upon which one can build toward whatever higher level of proficiency one requires. Furthermore, the academic minor gives students exposure to and knowledge of the work of some of the major figures in Czech culture, including such internationally acclaimed authors as Jaroslav Hašek, Karel Capek, and Milan Kundera, as well as the Nobel Prize winning poet Jaroslav Seifert. The ways in which Czech culture met the challenges of World War II, and of the subsequent forty years of Communist rule, is given major emphasis in several of the courses. Students may also learn about the important contributions of Czech filmmakers to world culture. Thus, the academic minor will have substantial value for all students who have an intellectual interest in Czech culture, even in cases where Czech studies do not figure directly in the student's career plans. This might be the case particularly for students who trace part of their own family heritage to the Czech lands. Finally, several of the courses address question about ethnic discriminations as they have been dealt with in literature and film, a feature which would deepen students' understanding through the comparative perspective it would provide.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor. CZECH 241 or equivalent.

Academic Minor Program. 16 credits of courses, including CZECH 242 (4 credits) and 12 credits in courses selected from the following two categories, with at least 6 credits from category B.

Category A: Courses on Central European Slavic Culture (no more than 6 credits from Category A may count in the Academic Minor):

  • SLAVIC 225 (Arts and Cultures of Central Europe)
  • SLAVIC 312 (Central European Cinema)
  • SLAVIC 423 (Central European Literature in the Twentieth Century)

Students may count up to 3 credits of Third-Year Czech (CZECH 341 and 342) toward the Academic Minor.

Category B: Courses on Czech culture, literature, and cinema (at least 6 credits are required from Category B):

  • CZECH 480 (Supervised Czech Reading)
  • CZECH 483 (Czech Literature from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment)
  • CZECH 484 (Modern Czech Literature)
  • SLAVIC 470 (Topics in Cultural Studies of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe) (appropriate sections)
  • SLAVIC 490 (Issues of the Cultures of Eastern Europe)(appropriate sections)


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