Minor: Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture

Slavic Languages and Literatures Academic Minors

Academic minors in Slavic Languages and Literatures are not open to those electing a concentration or any other academic minor in the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, nor to those electing a concentration in the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REES). Students may concurrently pursue an academic minor in both REES and Slavic with the following restrictions:

  1. REES minors may not count any courses for which Slavic is the home unit
  2. Slavic minors may not count REES 397 or any courses for which REES is the home unit, which includes SLAVIC 395 and 396.

Students wishing to pursue an academic minor in the Department of  Slavic Languages and Literatures must develop a specific plan for its completion in consultation with the department's designated advisor.

Appointments are scheduled online at www.lsa.umich.edu/slavic/undergraduate/advising

 

 

The Academic minor in Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture is not open to those electing  any other academic minor in the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures,. Students may concurrently pursue an academic minor in both REES and Slavic with the following restrictions:

  • REES minors may not count any courses for which Slavic is the home unit
  • Slavic minors may not count REES 397 or any courses for which REES is the home unit, which includes SLAVIC 395 and 396.

Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture

Effective Fall 2012

An academic minor in Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture would provide to students already engaged with the language an opportunity to expand their knowledge and understanding of Ukrainian culture in the broader context of European society as a whole.

The academic minor in Ukrainian is a vibrant and multi-faceted program that integrates Ukrainian studies into broader intellectual and policy agendas, while promoting research and scholarly work on contemporary Ukraine in the United States. Its curriculum will educate students on the history, language, literature, and politics of Ukraine. In addition, study of Ukraine brings an important comparative perspective to international and interdisciplinary studies at the University of Michigan, as the Ukraine has historically been viewed as a meeting place of several major cultures: East Slavic, Jewish, Austro-Hungarian, and others.

This program could be of particular interest to undergraduate students in concentrations like Judaic Studies, History, the Program in the Environment, Political Science, and Sociology.

Ukraine's highly educated population (seventh in Europe), natural wealth, size (second largest state in Europe), and location in the borderland between Europe and Asia and in between Poland and Russia, make it an important country both regionally and globally. With Ukraine's recent independence, it is an important time to introduce a broader audience the rich legacy of Ukrainian literature, history and culture. Ukraine now occupies a vital but often ambiguous strategic position as an independent country important to the security and stability of all of Europe. Ukraine's changing boundaries over the centuries gives us a completely different view of the culture of the post-Soviet years, and now in the expansion of the EU.

The latest achievements of inner freedom and the recognition of a diversity of cultures in Ukraine have become the main means for fostering research and academic contacts between Ukraine and the U.S. Ukraine is engaged in the global processes of state building, creation of a market economy, and social changes. Ukraine's democratic "Orange Revolution" has led to closer cooperation and more open dialogue between Ukraine and the United States.

The EU is seeking an increasingly close relationship with Ukraine, going beyond co-operation, to gradual economic integration and a deepening of political co-operation. NATO and the Ukraine actively cooperate in international peace-support operations and have developed practical cooperation in a wide range of other areas. In May 2008 Ukraine became a member of the World Trade Organization and has since engaged in negotiations for the establishment of a deep and comprehensive Free Trade Area.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor. UKRAINE 251 (with a grade of "C" or better) or equivalent as determined by the Departmental placement examination.

Academic Minor Program. at least 16 credits of courses including

  1. UKRAINE 252
  2. 12 credits in courses selected from the following two categories, with at least 6 credits from Category A.
    1. Category A: Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture
      • UKR 351 (3rd Year Ukrainian I),
      • UKR 352 (3rd Year Ukrainian II)
      • UKR 421 (Directed Readings in Ukrainian Literature)
      • SLAVIC 490 (Topic: Introduction to Ukrainian Culture)
      • UKR 320 (Introduction to Ukrainian Poetry)
    2. Category B: Eastern European Slavic Culture (No more than 6 credits from this category)
      • HISTORY 432 (Medieval and Early Modern Russia
      • RUSSIAN  435 (Cultural History of Russian Jews)
      • SLAVIC 240 (Slavic Folklore)
      • SLAVIC 270 (Contact and Conflict: Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe)
      • SLAVIC 313 (Russian and Ukrainian Cinema)
      • SLAVIC 395 (Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States)
      • SLAVIC 490 (Topics: Rock Kills Communism; Revolution in the Attic)

        (Up to 3 Credits) Study Abroad, Summer Internships in Ukraine and/or Field Work in Ukrainian Communities of Metro Detroit.The Department offers help in negotiating summer internships with companies in UKRAINE or within local Ukrainian communities.

Advising. Svitlana Rogovyk (Language Coordinator)

Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture Minor (F'11 - Su'12) +

 

 

Academic minors in Slavic Languages and Literatures are not open to those electing a concentration or any other academic minor in the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, nor to those electing a concentration in the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REES). Students may concurrently pursue an academic minor in both REES and Slavic with the following restrictions:

  • REES minors may not count any courses for which Slavic is the home unit
  • Slavic minors may not count REES 397 or any courses for which REES is the home unit, which includes SLAVIC 395 and 396.

Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture

Effective Fall 2011-Summer 2012

An academic minor in Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture would provide to students already engaged with the language an opportunity to expand their knowledge and understanding of Ukrainian culture in the broader context of European society as a whole.

The academic minor in Ukrainian is a vibrant and multi-faceted program that integrates Ukrainian studies into broader intellectual and policy agendas, while promoting research and scholarly work on contemporary Ukraine in the United States. Its curriculum will educate students on the history, language, literature, and politics of Ukraine. In addition, study of Ukraine brings an important comparative perspective to international and interdisciplinary studies at the University of Michigan, as the Ukraine has historically been viewed as a meeting place of several major cultures: East Slavic, Jewish, Austro-Hungarian, and others.

This program could be of particular interest to undergraduate students in concentrations like Judaic Studies, History, the Program in the Environment, Political Science, and Sociology.

Ukraine's highly educated population (seventh in Europe), natural wealth, size (second largest state in Europe), and location in the borderland between Europe and Asia and in between Poland and Russia, make it an important country both regionally and globally. With Ukraine's recent independence, it is an important time to introduce a broader audience the rich legacy of Ukrainian literature, history and culture. Ukraine now occupies a vital but often ambiguous strategic position as an independent country important to the security and stability of all of Europe. Ukraine's changing boundaries over the centuries gives us a completely different view of the culture of the post-Soviet years, and now in the expansion of the EU.

The latest achievements of inner freedom and the recognition of a diversity of cultures in Ukraine have become the main means for fostering research and academic contacts between Ukraine and the U.S. Ukraine is engaged in the global processes of state building, creation of a market economy, and social changes. Ukraine's democratic "Orange Revolution" has led to closer cooperation and more open dialogue between Ukraine and the United States.

The EU is seeking an increasingly close relationship with Ukraine, going beyond co-operation, to gradual economic integration and a deepening of political co-operation. NATO and the Ukraine actively cooperate in international peace-support operations and have developed practical cooperation in a wide range of other areas. In May 2008 Ukraine became a member of the World Trade Organization and has since engaged in negotiations for the establishment of a deep and comprehensive Free Trade Area.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor. UKRAINE 251 (with a grade of "C" or better) or equivalent as determined by the Departmental placement examination.

Academic Minor Program. at least 16 credits of courses including

  1. UKRAINE 252
  2. 12 credits in courses selected from the following two categories, with at least 6 credits from Category A.
    1. Category A: Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture
      • UKR 351 (3rd Year Ukrainian I),
      • UKR 352 (3rd Year Ukrainian II)
      • UKR 421 (Directed Readings in Ukrainian Literature)
      • SLAVIC 490 (Topic: Introduction to Ukrainian Culture)
      • UKR 320 (Introduction to Ukrainian Poetry)
    2. Category B: Eastern European Slavic Culture (No more than 6 credits from this category)
      • HISTORY 432 (Medieval and Early Modern Russia
      • RUSSIAN  435 (Cultural History of Russian Jews)
      • SLAVIC 240 (Slavic Folklore)
      • SLAVIC 270 (Contact and Conflict: Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe)
      • SLAVIC 313 (Russian and Ukrainian Cinema)
      • SLAVIC 395 (Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States)
      • SLAVIC 490 (Topics: Rock Kills Communism; Revolution in the Attic)

        (Up to 3 Credits) Study Abroad, Summer Internships in Ukraine and/or Field Work in Ukrainian Communities of Metro Detroit.The Department offers help in negotiating summer internships with companies in UKRAINE or within local Ukrainian communities.

Advising. Svitlana Rogovyk (Language Coordinator)

Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture Minor (Fall 2009-Summer 2011) +

 

 

Academic minors in Slavic Languages and Literatures are not open to those electing a concentration or any other academic minor in the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, nor to those electing a concentration in the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies (REES). Students may concurrently pursue an academic minor in both REES and Slavic with the following restrictions:

  • REES minors may not count any courses for which Slavic is the home unit
  • Slavic minors may not count REES 397 or any courses for which REES is the home unit, which includes SLAVIC 395 and 396.

Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture

Effective Fall 2009-Summer 2011 

 

An academic minor in Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture would provide to students already engaged with the language an opportunity to expand their knowledge and understanding of Ukrainian culture in the broader context of European society as a whole.

The academic minor in Ukrainian is a vibrant and multi-faceted program that integrates Ukrainian studies into broader intellectual and policy agendas, while promoting research and scholarly work on contemporary Ukraine in the United States. Its curriculum will educate students on the history, language, literature, and politics of Ukraine. In addition, study of Ukraine brings an important comparative perspective to international and interdisciplinary studies at the University of Michigan, as the Ukraine has historically been viewed as a meeting place of several major cultures: East Slavic, Jewish, Austro-Hungarian, and others.

This program could be of particular interest to undergraduate students in concentrations like Judaic Studies, History, the Program in the Environment, Political Science, and Sociology.

Ukraine's highly educated population (seventh in Europe), natural wealth, size (second largest state in Europe), and location make it an important country both regionally and globally. Located in the borderland between Europe and Asia, Poland and Russia, and with its recent independence, it is an important time to introduce a broader audience the rich legacy of Ukrainian literature, history, and culture. Since its independence from the Soviet Union, Ukraine has occupied a vital but often ambiguous strategic position as an independent country important to the security and stability of all of Europe. Ukraine's changing boundaries over the centuries gives us a completely different view of the culture of the post-Soviet years, and now in the expansion of the EU.

The latest achievements of inner freedom and the recognition of a diversity of cultures in Ukraine have become the main means for fostering research and academic contacts between Ukraine and the U.S. Ukraine is engaged in the global processes of state building, creation of a market economy, and social changes. Ukraine's democratic "Orange Revolution" has led to closer cooperation and more open dialogue between Ukraine and the United States.

The EU is seeking an increasingly close relationship with Ukraine, going beyond co-operation, to gradual economic integration and a deepening of political co-operation. NATO and the Ukraine actively cooperate in international peace-support operations and have developed practical cooperation in a wide range of other areas. In May 2008 Ukraine became a member of the World Trade Organization and has since engaged in negotiations for the establishment of a deep and comprehensive Free Trade Area.

Prerequisites to the Academic Minor. UKRAINE 251 (with a grade of "C" or better) or equivalent as determined by the Departmental placement examination.

Academic Minor Program. at least 16 credits of courses including

  1. UKRAINE 252
  2. 12 credits in courses selected from the following two categories, with at least 6 credits from Category A.

Category A: Ukrainian Language, Literature, and Culture

UKR 451 (Advanced Ukrainian),

UKR 452 (Advanced Ukrainian: Contemporary Issues)

UKR 421 (Directed Readings in Ukrainian Literature)

SLAVIC 490 (Topic: Introduction to Ukrainian Culture)

Category B: Eastern European Slavic Culture (No more than 6 credits from this category)

HISTORY 432 (Medieval and Early Modern Russia

SLAVIC 240 (Slavic Folklore)

SLAVIC 270 (Contact and Conflict: Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe)

SLAVIC 313 (Russian and Ukrainian Cinema)

SLAVIC 395 (Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States)

SLAVIC 435 (Cultural History of Russian Jews)

SLAVIC 490 (Topics: Rock Kills Communism; Revolution in the Attic):

(Up to 3 Credits) Study Abroad, Summer Internships in Ukraine and/or Field Work in Ukrainian Communities of Metro Detroit.The Department offers help in negotiating summer internships with companies in UKRAINE or within local Ukrainian communities.

Advising. Svitlana Rogovyk (Language Coordinator)


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