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Sociology departmental information

Consistently rated among the top departments in the country, Michigan Sociology has a long and distinguished tradition of excellence in both teaching and scholarship.

Sociology Advising

A department advisor is available to students for one-on-one appointments to discuss the choice of sociology as a major (or minor), assist in course selection, and advise on co-curricular opportunities and career preparation. Students can schedule an advising appointment by calling the department at (734) 764-6324 or using the online appointment scheduler at www.lsa.umich.edu/soc. Students can also email socadvisor@umich.edu with questions.

Special Department Policies +

Special Department Policies 

Students must earn at least a C– in the  prerequisites for the major (or minor) and in all courses they plan to include in the plan for the major (or minor). Courses elected as pass/fail may not be included in the plan for the major (or minor).

The department expects that at least 18 of the 33 credits required for a sociology major be completed with Department of Sociology faculty on the UM–Ann Arbor campus. The research methods and sociological theory courses must be taken in residence on the UM–Ann Arbor campus.

Credit Limits and Exclusions. A combined total of eight INDEPENDENT or EXPERIENTIAL credits may be included in the plan for the major. This includes SOC 225 (and 389), 321, 324, 394, 395, and 396. There is an additional limit on SOC 225 (or 389) credits; only four credits of SOC 225 (or 389) may be included in the plan for the major.

Sociology Major

Effective Date: Fall 2014

A major in sociology allows for a wide range of possible course elections, enabling students to create a personalized curriculum that matches their intellectual and career interests. The requirements for the major offer students a foundation in fundamental sociological principles, practices, theories, and methodology. Flexible major electives allow students to study the discipline broadly or to focus on a specific area of the discipline that inspires them.

Prerequisite to Major

Students planning to major in sociology must elect and complete with a C- or better one of the following introductory courses before declaring the major: SOC 100, 102, 195, or 300. SOC 195 is restricted to first- and second-year students who are in the LSA Honors Program and/or have a GPA of 3.2 or higher. Juniors and seniors electing an introductory course are strongly encouraged to elect SOC 300, although there is limited space available for seniors in SOC 100 and 102 in semesters in which SOC 300 is not offered. The prerequisite course cannot be included in the 33 credits required for completion of the plan for the major.

Students must earn at least a C-in the major prerequisite and in all courses they plan to include in the plan for the major. Courses elected as pass/fail may not be included in the plan for the major.

Requirements for the Major

After electing one of the introductory prerequisite courses, majors are required to complete at least 33 credits of SOC coursework at the 200 level or above, including:

  1. Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 250 (or their equivalent)
  2. Research Methods: SOC 310. Must be taken on UM—Ann Arbor campus
  3. Sociological Theory: SOC 305. Must be taken on UM—Ann Arbor campus

The remaining credits must come from SOC courses at the 200 level and above. Students who wish to focus their elective coursework on a particular area of sociology are encouraged to consult with the department advisor.

The department will allow up to two courses with significant sociological content from other LSA departments or transfer institutions to be included in the plan for the major. Students interested in petitioning to include a non-SOC course in their plan for the major should email their request to socadvisor@umich.edu and include a complete course syllabus.

The department expects that at least 18 of the 33 credits required for a sociology major be completed with Department of Sociology faculty on the UM-Ann Arbor campus. The research methods and sociological theory courses must be taken in residence on the UM-Ann Arbor campus.

Course Planning

The research methods and statistics courses facilitate the understanding of sociological themes and concepts explored in upper-division courses. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the statistics course in the sophomore year, the research methods course before the end of the junior year, and complete all three of the required courses before the final  academic term of the senior year. Students intending to write an honors thesis in sociology must take statistics before the first term of the junior year and the methods course no later than the second term of the junior year.

Credit Limits and Exclusions

A combined total of eight INDEPENDENT or EXPERIENTIAL credits may be included in the plan for the major. This includes SOC 225 (and 389), 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396. There is an additional limit on SOC 225 (and 389) credits; only four credits of SOC 225 (and 389) may be included in the plan for the major.

Law, Justice, and Social Change submajor

Effective Fall 2014

Students have the option of adding a subplan in “Law, Justice, and Social Change” to their Sociology major. Courses in Law, Justice, and Social Change submajor emphasize the ways in which legal and other social institutions reproduce and exacerbate social inequalities, and the capacity of social groups to challenge such institutions in ways that produce fundamental social change. A wide range of courses will explore how we understand the concepts of justice and apply it and will develop knowledge in criminology, law, social movements, human rights.

Requirements for the submajor. To have a notation of the submajor appear on your transcript, you must successfully complete a minimum of 12 credits from the following list:  

  • SOC 270, 350, 354, 368, 461, 465, 476, 489
  • appropriate topics in SOC 295, 495
  • approved independent studies in SOC 395
  • criminal justice settings of SOC 225 (or 389)

A maximum of 6 credits for the subplan may come from Experiential Learning or Independent Study style courses.

Sociology Honors Plan +

Effective Fall 2012 

The Program begins with SOC 497 (3 credits) in the second term of the junior year and continues through the senior year with SOC 498 (3 credits) and 499 (3 credits). During SOC 498 and 499, students work with the supervision of their faculty mentors, while continuing to meet individually with the faculty Honors coordinator. SOC 497 is offered in the Winter Term only.

Honors Application Prerequisites and Course Planning

Applicants to the Honors Program in Sociology have at least a 3.5 GPA within their sociology courses and at least a 3.4 cumulative GPA in their LS&A courses. In addition, they already will have demonstrated originality in their own course work, shown a serious interest in scholarly research, and given evidence of their ability to work independently on a thesis. Students should plan on completing SOC 210 or STATS 250 (or 350) prior  to enrolling in SOC 497 and should take SOC 310 or 312 prior to or concurrently with it. The Honors Program in Sociology is a three-semester sequence of course and thesis work. Students typically apply as first-semester juniors and begin with the first course, SOC 497, the following semester.

To graduate with Honors, students must meet all requirements for the major; complete SOC 497, 498, and 499; write an acceptable Honors thesis; and maintain a 3.4 overall GPA. Upon completion of this course work and dependent upon the evaluation of the thesis, the academic record and diploma will designate the degree awarded "with Honors," "with High Honors," or "with Highest Honors."

Interested students should call (734) 764-6324 or visit lsa.umich.edu/soc/undergraduate/advisingandprogrampolicies to make an appointment with the department's department advisor.

Sociology Major (Winter 2013-Summer 2014) +

Effective Date:  Winter 2013-Summer 2014

A major in sociology allows for a wide range of possible course elections, enabling students to create a personalized curriculum that matches their intellectual and career interests. The requirements for the major offer students a foundation in fundamental sociological principles, practices, theories, and methodology. Flexible major electives allow students to study the discipline broadly or to focus on a specific area of the discipline that inspires them.

Prerequisite to Major

Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect and complete with a C- or better one of the following introductory courses before declaring the major: SOC 100, 102, 195, or 300. SOC 195 is restricted to first- and second-year students who are in the LSA Honors Program and/or have a GPA of 3.2 or higher. Juniors and seniors electing an introductory course are strongly encouraged to elect SOC 300, although there is limited space available for seniors in SOC 100 and 102 in semesters in which SOC 300 is not offered. The prerequisite course cannot be included in the 33 credits required for completion of the plan for the major.

Students must earn at least a C-in the major prerequisite and in all courses they plan to include in the plan for the major. Courses elected as pass/fail may not be included in the plan for the major.

Requirements for the Major

After electing one of the introductory prerequisite courses, majors are required to complete at least 33 credits of SOC coursework at the 200 level or above, including:

  1. Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 250 (or their equivalent)
  2. Research Methods: SOC 310. Must be taken on UM—Ann Arbor campus
  3. Sociological Theory: SOC 305. Must be taken on UM—Ann Arbor campus

The remaining credits must come from SOC courses at the 200 level and above. Students who wish to focus their elective coursework on a particular area of sociology are encouraged to consult with the department advisor.

The department will allow up to two courses with significant sociological content from other LSA departments or transfer institutions to be included in the plan for the major. Students interested in petitioning to include a non-SOC course in their plan for the major should email their request to socadvisor@umich.edu and include a complete course syllabus.

The department expects that at least 18 of the 33 credits required for a sociology major be completed with Department of Sociology faculty on the UM-Ann Arbor campus. The research methods and sociological theory courses must be taken in residence on the UM-Ann Arbor campus.

Course Planning

The research methods and statistics courses facilitate the understanding of sociological themes and concepts explored in upper-division courses. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the statistics course in the sophomore year, the research methods course before the end of the junior year, and complete all three of the required courses before the final  academic term of the senior year. Students intending to write an honors thesis in sociology must take statistics before the first term of the junior year and the methods course no later than the second term of the junior year.

Credit Limits and Exclusions

A combined total of eight INDEPENDENT or EXPERIENTIAL credits may be included in the plan for the major. This includes SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396. There is an additional limit on SOC 389 credits; only four credits of SOC 389 may be included in the plan for the major.

Sociology Major (Fall 2012) +

Effective Date: Fall 2012

A major in sociology allows for a wide range of possible course elections, enabling students to create a personalized curriculum that matches their intellectual and career interests. The requirements for the major offer students a foundation in fundamental sociological principles, practices, theories, and methodology. Flexible major electives allow students to study the discipline broadly or to focus on a specific area of the discipline that inspires them.

Prerequisite to Major

Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect and complete with a C- or better one of the following introductory courses before declaring the major: SOC 100, 102, 195, or 300. SOC 195 is restricted to first- and second-year students who are in the LSA Honors Program and/or have a GPA of 3.2 or higher. Juniors and seniors electing an introductory course are strongly encouraged to elect SOC 300, although there is limited space available for seniors in SOC 100 and 102 in semesters in which SOC 300 is not offered. The prerequisite course cannot be included in the 33 credits required for completion of the plan for the major.

Students must earn at least a C-in the major prerequisite and in all courses they plan to include in the plan for the major. Courses elected as pass/fail may not be included in the plan for the major.

Requirements for the Major

After electing one of the introductory prerequisite courses, majors are required to complete at least 33 credits of SOC coursework, including one course in each:

  1. Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 250 (or their equivalent)
  2. Research Methods: SOC 310 or 312
  3. Sociological Theory: SOC 305

The remaining credits must come from SOC courses at the 200 level and above. Students who wish to focus their elective coursework on a particular area of sociology are encouraged to consult with the department advisor.

The department will allow up to two courses with significant sociological content from other LSA departments or transfer institutions to be included in the plan for the major. Students interested in petitioning to include a non-SOC course in their plan for the major should email their request to socadvisor@umich.edu and include a complete course syllabus.

The department expects that at least 18 of the 33 credits required for a sociology major be completed with Department of Sociology faculty on the UM-Ann Arbor campus. The research methods and sociological theory courses must be taken in residence on the UM-Ann Arbor campus.

Course Planning

The research methods and statistics courses facilitate the understanding of sociological themes and concepts explored in upper-division courses. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the statistics course in the sophomore year, the research methods course before the end of the junior year, and complete all three of the required courses before the final  academic term of the senior year. Students intending to write an honors thesis in sociology must take statistics before the first term of the junior year and the methods course no later than the second term of the junior year.

Credit Limits and Exclusions

A combined total of eight INDEPENDENT or EXPERIENTIAL credits may be included in the plan for the major. This includes SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396. There is an additional limit on SOC 389 credits; only four credits of SOC 389 may be included in the plan for the major.

Sociology Honors Program

Sociology major (Fall 2011-Winter 2012) +

Effective Date of Major: Fall 2011-Summer 2012

 

A major in sociology allows for a wide range of possible course elections, enabling students to create a personalized curriculum that matches their intellectual and career interests. The requirements for the major offer students a foundation in fundamental sociological principles, practices, theories, and methodology. Flexible major electives allow students to study the discipline broadly or to focus on a specific area of the discipline that inspires them.

Prerequisite to Major. Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect an introductory course before declaring the major: SOC 100, 102, 105, 195, or 300. SOC 105 and 195 are restricted to first-year students only. Juniors and seniors electing an introductory course are strongly encouraged to elect SOC 300, although there is limited space available for upper level students in SOC 100 and 102 in  academic terms in which SOC 300 is not offered. None of the prerequisite courses can be included in the 33 credits required for the plan for the major.

Students must earn a C- or better in every course they wish to include in the plan for the major. Courses elected as pass/fail may not be included in the plan for the major.

Requirements for the Major

After electing one of the introductory prerequisite courses, majors are required to complete at least 33 credits of SOC coursework, including one course in each:

  1. Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 250 (or their equivalent)
  2. Research Methods: SOC 310 or 312
  3. Sociological Theory: SOC 305

The remaining credits must come from SOC courses at the 200 level and above. Students who wish to focus their elective coursework on a particular area of sociology are encouraged to consult with the department advisor.

The department will allow up to two courses with significant sociological content from other LSA departments or transfer institutions to be included in the plan for the major. Students interested in petitioning to include a non-SOC course in their plan for the major should email their request to socadvisor@umich.edu and include a complete course syllabus.

The department expects that at least 18 of the 33 credits required for a sociology major be completed with Department of Sociology faculty on the UM-Ann Arbor campus. The research methods and sociological theory courses must be taken in residence on the UM-Ann Arbor campus.

Course Planning. The research methods and statistics courses facilitate the understanding of sociological themes and concepts explored in upper-division courses. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the statistics course in the sophomore year, the research methods course before the end of the junior year, and complete all three of the required courses before the final  academic term of the senior year. Students intending to write an honors thesis in sociology must take statistics before the first term of the junior year and the methods course no later than the second term of the junior year.

Credit Limits and Exclusions. A combined total of eight INDEPENDENT or EXPERIENTIAL credits may be included in the plan for the major. This includes SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396. There is an additional limit on SOC 389 credits; only four credits of SOC 389 may be included in the plan for the major.

 


Sociology Honors Program

Sociology major (Fall 2010-Summer 2011) +

Effective Date of Major: Fall 2010-Summer 2011 

May be elected as a departmental major

The sociology major allows for flexibility in course selection, enabling students to create a personalized program that matches their intellectual and career interests. The requirements for the major offer students a foundation in fundamental sociological principles, practices, theories, and methodology, and allows them to focus on a specific area of the discipline that inspires them.

Prerequisites to the Major. Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect an introductory course before declaring the major. First- and second-year students choose from SOC 100, 101, 102, 105, 195, 202, or 300. If no previous introductory sociology has been elected, juniors may choose, and seniors must choose SOC 202 or 300.

Requirements for the Major

After electing one of the introductory prerequisites, majors are required to complete at least 30 credits of SOC courses, including:

  1. Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 250 (or 350) (or their equivalent) completed with a grade of C- or better. Credit is not granted for SOC 210 if STATS 100 has been taken.
  2. Research Methods: SOC 310 or 312 completed with a grade of C- or better.
  3. Social Theory: SOC 305 completed with a grade of C- or better.
  4. Electives in Sociology. The remaining credits must be chosen from SOC courses at the 200 level and above, chosen in consultation with the department advisor.

Research Methods and Statistics aid in understanding sociological themes and concepts that are explored in our upper-level courses. Students share stronlgy encouraged to complete the Statistics and Research Methods requirement before their senior year.

The department will allow up to two courses from other LS&A departments to be included in the plan for the major.

The department expects that 15 of the 30 required credits for a sociology major be earned on the UM-Ann Arbor campus.

A combined total of eight credits of independent study or experiential credit may be included in the major. This includes SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396. Note that there is an additional limit of SOC 389 credits; only four credit of SOC 389 may be included in the major.

500-level courses may be taken by undergraduates with permission of instructor only.

 


Sociology Honors Program

Sociology major [Winter 2010-Summer 2010] +

 

 Effective Date of Major: Winter 2010-Summer 2010 

May be elected as a departmental major

The sociology major allows for flexibility in course selection, enabling students to create a personalized program that matches their intellectual and career interests. The requirements for the major offer students a foundation in fundamental sociological principles, practices, theories, and methodology, and allows them to focus on a specific area of the discipline that inspires them.

Prerequisites to the Major. Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect an introductory course before declaring the major. First- and second-year students choose from SOC 100, 101, 102, 105, 195, 202, or 300. If no previous introductory sociology has been elected, juniors may choose, and seniors must choose SOC 202 or 300.

Requirements for the Major. After electing one of the introductory prerequisites, majors are required to complete at least 30 credits of SOC courses, including:

  1. Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 250 (or 350) (or their equivalent) completed with a grade of C- or better. Credit is not granted for SOC 210 if STATS 100 has been taken.
  2. Research Methods: SOC 310 completed with a grade of C- or better.
  3. Social Theory: SOC 305 or 405 completed with a grade of C- or better.
  4. Electives in Sociology. The remaining credits must be chosen from SOC courses at the 200-level and above, chosen in consultation with the department advisor.

Research Methods and Statistics aid in understanding sociological themes and concepts that are explored in our upper-level courses. Students share stronlgy encouraged to complete the Statistics and Research Methods requirement before their senior year.

The department will allow up to two courses from other LS&A departments to be included in the plan for the major.

The department expects that at least one-half of credits applied to a sociology major program will be earned in residence.

Please note that only four credits of SOC 389 can be used towards a major program in Sociology. This course is offered mandatory credit/no credit. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a major program in sociology.

500-level courses may be taken by undergraduates with permission of instructor only.

 

Sociology Honors Program

Sociology major (Fall 2005-Fall 2009) +

 Effective Date of Major Fall Term 2005-Fall 2009

May be elected as a departmental major

The sociology major allows for flexibility in course selection, enabling students to create a personalized program that matches their academic and career interests. The requirements for the major offer students a foundation in fundamental sociological principles, practices, theories, and methodology, and allows them to focus on a specific discipline that inspires them.

Prerequisites to the Major. Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect an introductory course before declaring the major. First- and second-year students choose from SOC 100, 101, 102, 105, 195, 202, or 300. If no previous introductory sociology has been elected, juniors may choose, and seniors must choose SOC 202 or 300.

 Requirements for the major. After electing one of the introductory prerequisites, majors are required to complete at least 30 credits of SOC courses, including:

  1.  Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 350 (or their equivalent) completed with a grade of C- or better. Credit is not granted for SOC 210 if STATS 100 has been taken.
  2.  Research Methods: SOC 310 completed with a grade of C- or better.
  3.  Social Theory: SOC 305 or 405 completed with a grade of C- or better.
  4. Electives in Sociology. The remaining credits must be chosen from SOC courses at the 200-level and above, chosen in consultation with the department advisor.

Research Methods and Statistics aid in understanding sociological themes and concepts that are explored in our upper-level courses. Students share stronlgy encouraged to complete the Statistics and Research Methods requirement before their senior year.

The department will allow up to two courses from other LS&A departments to be included in the plan for the major.

The department expects that at least one-half of credits applied to a sociology major program will be earned in residence.

Please note that only four credits of SOC 389 can be used towards a major program in Sociology. This course is offered mandatory credit/no credit. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a major program in sociology.

500-level courses may be taken by undergraduates with permission of instructor only.

 

Sub-major. Sub-majors within the sociology major provide an optional intellectual focus for students who wish to deepen their knowledge of a particular subfield within the discipline as described below.

Requirements. To have a notation of the sub-major completion appear on your transcript, you must successfully complete four courses (a minimum of 12 credit hours) from the list of relevant classes that corresponds with each sub-major.. Sub-majors are not added to the transcript until all coursework is completed. The Department of Sociology cannot guarantee that the courses listed under each sub-major will be available in a sequence that will allow all students to complete the sub-major of their choice before they leave the University. Please direct any questions about the sub-majors to the Department's department advisor.

Each course can only be counted toward one sub-major. Students may complete more than one sub-major.

Law, Criminology and Deviance

Courses in the Law, Criminology and Deviance sub-major focus on the intersection of society and the law. Specifically, they analyze the social nature of the criminal justice system, perceptions of deviance, juvenile delinquency, and corporate crime..

SOC 368, 434, 435, 452, 454, 465; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 295, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 in criminal justice settings.

Social Inequality

Courses in the Social Inequality sub-major focus on inequality based on race, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation, gender, and class.

SOC 205, 231, 303, 304, 320, 321, 323, 330, 331, 344, 345, 410, 423, 424, 434, 435, 447, 450, 451; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 295, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 (Education settings, Criminal Justice settings, Safe House, Ozone House, Homeless Outreach Program).

Economy, Business and Society

Courses in the Economy, Business, and Society sub-major analyze the intersection of society and the economy. Specifically, they focus on economic development, complex organizations, bureaucracies, industry, corporations, professions and occupations, and the sociology of work.  

SOC 212, 220, 222, 231, 305, 315, 420, 423, 424, 440, 442, 451, 453; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 295, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497.

Social Welfare and Social Services

Courses in the Social Welfare and Social Services sub-major focus on social institutions such as the family, community, marriage, the educational system, and welfare. They analyze how these institutions originated, have changed over time, and how they affect our daily lives.

SOC 344, 368, 434, 435, 444, 455, 458; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 295, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 (in any setting).

Health and Aging

Courses in the Health and Aging sub-major emphasize a broad range of health issues and the demographics and population trends involving health care and aging. A significant percentage of the population in the United States is currently aging, health care costs are accelerating and demographic change is occurring throughout the world.

SOC 205, 231, 345, 475; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 295, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 in Public Health Settings.

International Social Change

Courses in the International Social Change sub-major consider how social problems materialize and are resolved, examining social class, social movements, revolutions, political processes and alternative structures in the United States and around the world.

SOC 231, 304, 330, 331, 392, 393, 426, 427, 428, 450, 455, 458, 460; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 295, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497.

Sociology Honors Program

Sociology major (Fall Term 2003 until Summer 2005) +

effective date of major Fall Term 2003 until Summer 2005 

May be elected as a departmental major

Prerequisites to the Major. Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect one of the introductory courses. First- and second-year students choose from SOC 100 (Principles of Sociology), 101 (Person and Society), 102 (Social Issues), 105 (First-Year Seminar), 195 (Principles of Sociology-Honors), 202 (Contemporary Social Issues I), or 300 (Sociological Principles and Problems). If no previous introductory sociology has been elected, juniors may choose, and seniors must choose SOC 202 or 300.

Requirements for the Major. After electing one of the introductory prerequisites, majors are required to complete at least 30 credits of SOC courses, including:

  1. Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 350 (or their equivalent) completed with a grade of "C-" or better. Credit is not granted for SOC 210 if STATS 100 has been taken.
  2. Research Methods: SOC 310.
  3. Social Theory: SOC 305 or 405.
  4. Electives in Sociology. The remaining credits must be chosen from SOC courses at the 200-level and above, chosen in consultation with the department advisor.

Research Methods and Statistics aid in understanding sociological themes and concepts that are explored in our upper-level courses. Students should plan on completing the Statistics and Research Methods requirement before their senior year.

The Department will only allow one-two courses from other LS&A departments to be included in the plan for the major.

The Department expects that at least one-half of credits applied to a sociology major program will be earned in residence.

Please note that only four credits of SOC 389 can be used towards a major program in Sociology. This course is offered mandatory credit/no credit. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a major program in sociology.

500-level courses may be taken by undergraduates with permission of instructor only.

Sub-major. The Sociology department offers an optional program that gives students the opportunity to gain certification in one of six different sub-majors. The goal of this program is to provide a coherent intellectual focus for students who desire a specialized major program. Currently, the department offers the following sub-majors:

  • Law, Criminology and Deviance
  • Social Inequality: Race, Class and Gender
  • Social Welfare and Social Services
  • Health and Aging
  • International Social Change
  • Economy, Business and Society

Requirements. At least four courses with a minimum of 12 credits (included in the 30 credits for major) are required for a sub-major. Each course can only be counted toward one sub-major. Students may complete more than one sub-major.

Students should notify the sociology department advisor via email (khany@umich.edu) to add a sub-major. Sub-majors will appear on the transcript. The department, upon graduation, issues a certificate of completion.

Description of Individual Areas:

The Law, Criminology and Deviance sub-major focuses on the intersection of the law and society. Specifically it analyzes the social nature of the criminal justice system, deviance, juvenile delinquency and corporate crime. Since the law and crime affect all of our lives, such examination is relevant to many future fields of study, employment and lifework. Jobs for which this training may be helpful include: client advocate, research/data analyst, social worker, community organizer, human services worker, lawyer, paralegal, probation/ parole officer, judge, legislative aide, mediator, forensic investigator and law enforcement officer. Additionally, specializing in Law, Criminology and Deviance is excellent preparation for graduate study in the following fields: Law, Criminal Justice, Anthropology, Political Science, Psychology, Social Work, Sociology and Women's Studies.

SOC 368, 434, 435, 452, 454, 465; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 (Criminal Justice settings).

The Social Inequality sub-major focuses on inequality based on race, ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation, gender and class. Given the vast changes occurring in the population of the United States and with social inequality affecting our lives and the institutions with which we come into contact, such examination is relevant to many future fields of study, employment and lifework. Jobs for which this training would be helpful include: client advocate, research/data analyst, social worker, policy analyst, community organizer, human services worker and teacher. Additionally, a specialization in Social Inequality is excellent preparation for graduate study in the following fields: Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Social Work, Sociology and Women's Studies.

SOC 205, 231, 303, 304, 323, 330, 331, 344, 345, 410, 423, 424, 434, 435, 447, 450; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 (Education settings, Criminal Justice settings, Safe House, Ozone House, Homeless Outreach Program).

The Economy, Business and Society sub-major analyzes the intersection between the economy and society. Specifically it focuses on economic development, complex organizations, bureaucracies, industry, corporations, professions and occupations and the sociology of work. Because business is central to our lives, such examination is relevant to many future fields of study, employment and lifework. Jobs for which this training may be helpful include: personnel manager/trainer, organizational design consultant, systems analyst, customer relations representative and labor relations consultant. Additionally, specializing in Economy, Business and Society is excellent preparation for graduate study in the following fields: Business, Economics, Political Science and Sociology.

SOC 212, 231, 305, 315, 420, 423, 424, 440, 442; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 (Center for Empowerment and Economic Development).

The Social Welfare and Social Services sub-major focuses on social institutions such as the family, community, marriage, the educational system and welfare. It analyzes how these institutions originated, have changed over time and how they affect our daily lives. Since social institutions and services are omnipresent, such examination is relevant to many future fields of study, employment and lifework. Jobs for which this training would be helpful include: client advocate, research/data analyst, social worker, community organizer, human services worker, program manager/administrator, urban/regional planner, policy analyst and teacher. Additionally, specializing in Social Welfare and Social Services is excellent preparation for graduate study in the following fields: Anthropology, Education, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Public Health, Public Policy, Social Work, Sociology and Women's Studies.

SOC 344, 368, 434, 435, 444, 455, 458, 481; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 (Health settings, Education settings, Criminal Justice settings, Safe House, Ozone House, Homeless Outreach Program).

The Health and Aging sub-major emphasizes a broad range of health issues and the demographics and population trends involving health care and aging. Given that the population in the United States is aging, health care costs are accelerating and demographic change is occurring throughout the world, such examination is relevant to many future fields of study, employment and lifework. Jobs for which this training would be helpful include: client advocate, health care administrator, gerontologist, social worker, research/data analyst and human services worker. Additionally, specializing in Health and Aging is excellent preparation for graduate study in the following areas: Medicine, Psychology, Public Health, Public Policy, Social Work, Sociology, Population and Gerontology.

SOC 205, 231, 345, 475; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497; SOC 389 (Hospital and Health Settings, UM retirement community).

The International Social Change sub-major considers how social problems materialize and are resolved, examining social class, social movements, revolutions, political processes and alternative structures in the United States and around the world. Since social change affects our lives and the institutions with which we come into contact, such examination is relevant to many future fields of study, employment and lifework. Jobs for which this training would be helpful include: client advocate, research/data analyst, social worker, community organizer, human services worker and teacher. Additionally, specializing in International Social Change is excellent preparation for graduate study in the following fields: Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Public Health, Social Work, Sociology and Women's Studies.

SOC 231, 304, 330, 331, 392, 393, 426, 427, 428, 450, 455, 458, 460; appropriate topics in SOC 202, 395, 397, 398, 399, 495, 496, 497.

Advising. Advisors are available to discuss the choice of sociology as a major, help you select your area of specialization in sociology, assist you in selecting required courses, and advise you on graduate study, career preparation, and other opportunities in the field. Appointments can be made by contacting the Sociology Undergraduate Student Services Office at (734) 647-6895.

Sociology Honors Program

Sociology major (Fall Term 2000-Summer 2003) +

effective date of major Fall Term 2000-Summer 2003

May be elected as a departmental major

Prerequisites to the Major. Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect one of the introductory courses. First- and second-year students choose from SOC 100 (Principles of Sociology), 101 (Person and Society), 102, 105 (First-Year Seminar), 195 (Principles of Sociology-Honors), 202 (Contemporary Social Issues I), 203 (Contemporary Social Issues II), 300 (Sociological Principles and Problems), or 401 (Contemporary Social Issues III). If no previous introductory sociology has been elected, juniors may choose, and seniors must choose SOC 300 (Sociological Principles and Problems) or 401 (Contemporary Social Issues III).

Requirements for the Major. After electing one of the introductory prerequisites, majors are required to complete at least 30 credits of SOC courses, including:

  1. Statistics: SOC 210 or STATS 350 (or their equivalent) completed with a grade of "C-" or better. Credit is not granted for SOC 210 if STATS 100 has been taken.
  2. Research Methods: SOC 310.
  3. Social Theory: SOC 305 or 405.
  4. Electives in Sociology. The remaining credits must be chosen from SOC courses at the 200-level and above, chosen in consultation with and approved by the department advisor.

Research Methods and Statistics aid in understanding sociological themes and concepts that are explored in our upper-level courses. Students should plan on completing the Statistics and Research Methods requirement before their senior year.

The Department will only allow one-two courses from other LS&A departments to be included in the plan for the major.

The Department expects that at least one-half of credits applied to a sociology major program will be earned in residence.

Please note that only four credits of SOC 389 can be used towards a major program in Sociology. This course is offered mandatory credit/no credit. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a major program in sociology.

500-level courses may be taken by undergraduates with permission of instructor only.

Students are encouraged to consult with a department advisor if they are interested in specializing within distinct areas of sociology. These Areas of Specialization may be of particular interest to those planning to pursue graduate study or a closely related career. To receive certification in an area of specialization, a student is expected to take at least four courses and at least 12 credits (included in the total hours of major) within that area. (Appropriate Independent Study courses can count.) The Areas of Specialization include: Law, Criminology, and Deviance; Economy, Business, and Society; Health, Aging, and Population; Social Welfare, Social Organizations, and Social Services; Social Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender; International Social Change; and Methods of Research.

Law, Criminology, and Deviance is particularly relevant to students considering careers or graduate study within law, criminal justice, and social work. Topics studied include law and society, the criminal justice system, deviance, and juvenile delinquency.

Economy, Business, and Society is especially useful for students planning graduate study or work within private industry and large public institutions. This area of specialization studies corporations, occupations, and the sociology of work.

Health, Aging, and Population considers issues of interest to students contemplating graduate work or careers in medicine and related fields ranging from hospital administration to gerontology to social work. The study of medical sociology, population trends, and health-related issues are emphasized.

The study of Social Welfare, Social Organizations, and Social Services is useful for those interested in social welfare, social work, the family, and urban institutions, including education.

The study of Social Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender emphasizes social problems related to inequality based on race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, ability, and class. It is useful for students considering a wide variety of career options or plans for graduate study.

International Social Change considers how social problems occur and are resolved, examining social movements in the United States and the rest of the world. Since social change affects all our lives and all the institutions with which we come into contact, such preparation is relevant to many future fields of study, employment, and lifework.

The Methods of Research area of specialization surveys various sociological approaches to social research. It offers students an opportunity to pursue advanced training in the area of research methods. This will benefit students considering careers in applied research settings, as well as graduate and professional careers.

Latina/Latino Studies Sociology Option. A component of the Program in American Culture, Latina/Latino Studies is designed to give students an opportunity to understand the experiences, values and traditions of Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and other peoples of Spanish, Indian, and African descent that comprise the Hispanic-American population of the United States. An Interdisciplinary degree, the Latina/Latino Studies major may be elected through Sociology. Thus, a student electing to concentrate in Latina/Latino Studies must satisfy all the requirements for the major in Sociology as well as the requirements in Latina/Latino Studies in order to double-concentrate. See the Bulletin for an in depth description of this program or contact the American Culture Office (764-9934) in 2412 Mason Hall.

Advising. Advisors are available to discuss the choice of sociology as a major, help you select your area of specialization in sociology, assist you in selecting required courses, and advise you on graduate study, career preparation, and other opportunities in the field. Appointments can be made by contacting the Sociology Undergraduate Program Office at (734) 764-7239.

Sociology Honors Program

The Honors Program allows the Sociology Department to combine some of the best features of a liberal arts college with those of a major research university. Honors classes are typically small and allow for interaction with faculty committed to undergraduate education. In addition, by writing a thesis, Honors students have the opportunity to do independent research under the supervision of scholars widely respected in their fields. The thesis both demonstrates the expertise students have developed in their undergraduate years and illustrates their capacity to contribute to a field of inquiry - especially important should they pursue advanced degrees. Thus, it stands as an emblem both of undergraduate achievement and of scholarly promise.

Equally important, Honors students find the opportunity to work in tandem with inventive and highly-motivated peers, a reward in itself. The sequence of thesis seminars provides a context in which students exchange information, provide support for one another's work, and offer feedback as projects develop.

Beyond these educational rewards, the pragmatic benefits of the Honors Program are also important: independent research naturally looks good to graduate and professional schools, as does a recommendation from a professor who knows you well. A Michigan degree awarded "with Honors" (or perhaps "with Highest Honors") catches the eye of prospective employers. And, of course, the completion of an independent project encourages the self-confidence that stands you in good stead whether you enter business, the professions, academe, or politics.

Students who enter the University in Honors or join it in their first two years may take Honors Principles of Sociology (Sociology 195), but the Program consists of a three-term sequence of seminars and guided research that culminates in the thesis. Students typically apply to the Sociology Honors Program as first-term juniors. (Because depth in a particular area of sociology may aid students in formulating and conducting their thesis research, the areas of specialization offered by the Department should be considered at this time).

The Program officially begins with SOC 397 (3 credits) in the second term of the junior year and continues through the senior year with SOC 398 (3 credits) and 399 (3 credits). During SOC 398 and 399, students work with the supervision of their faculty mentors, while continuing to meet with the Honors coordinator.

Prerequisites. Typically Sociology Honors majors have at least a 3.5 GPA within their sociology courses and at least a 3.3 GPA in their LS&A courses. In addition, they already will have demonstrated originality in their own course work, shown a serious interest in scholarly research, and given evidence of their ability to work independently on a thesis. Students should plan on completing SOC 210 (Statistics) or STATS 350 prior to enrolling in SOC 397 and should take SOC 310 (Methods) concurrently with it. For most students this will mean that the statistics course should be taken as a first-term Junior. Both SOC 210 and 310 should be completed before enrolling in SOC 398 and 399.

To graduate with Honors, students must meet all general requirements for the major, complete SOC 397, 398, and 399, and write an acceptable Honors thesis. Upon completion of this course work and dependent upon the evaluation of the thesis, the academic record and diploma will designate the degree awarded "with Honors," "with High Honors," or "with Highest Honors."

Interested students should call the Sociology Undergraduate Program Office at (734) 764-7239 to arrange an appointment with the Department's advisors.


 

Sociology major (effective prior to Fall 2000) +

Sociology (effective prior to Fall 2000)

May be elected as a departmental major

Prerequisites to the Major. Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect one of the introductory courses. First- and second-year students choose from Sociology 100 (Principles of Sociology), 101 (Person and Society), 102 , 195 (Principles of Sociology-Honors), 202 (Contemporary Social Issues I), 203 (Contemporary Social Issues II), 400 (Sociological Principles and Problems), or 401 (Contemporary Social Issues III). If no previous introductory sociology has been elected, juniors may choose, and seniors must choose Sociology 400 (Sociological Principles and Problems) or 401 (Contemporary Social Issues III).

Requirements for the Major. After electing one of the introductory prerequisites, majors are required to complete at least 30 credits of sociology courses, including:

  1. Statistics: Sociology 210 or Statistics 402 (or their equivalent) completed with a grade of "C-" or better.
  2. Research Methods: Sociology 310.
  3. Areas of Sociology: At least one course in the three major areas of the discipline: (a) social psychology, (b) population, urban studies and human ecology, and (c) social organization. The sociology courses which are approved in each of these areas are:
    1. Social Psychology: 101, 205, 452, 463, 464, 465, 471, 472, 481.
    2. Population, Urban Studies, and Human Ecology: 231, 304, 330, 331, 336, 430, 434, 435.
    3. Social Organization: includes most other sociology courses, except those which are methodological in character.

A second introductory course but not a third may be used towards a major in Sociology.

Students should plan on completing the Statistics and Research Methods requirement before their senior year.

Department advisors have an updated list of the approved courses, and selection should be made with approval of an advisor.

The Department expects that at least one-half of credits applied to a sociology major program will be earned in residence.

It should be noted that up to 4 credits of Sociology 389 can be used towards a major program in Sociology. This course is offered mandatory credit/no credit.

500-level courses may be taken by undergraduates with permission of instructor only.

Students are encouraged to consult with a department advisor if they are interested in specializing within distinct areas of sociology. These Areas of Specialization may be of particular interest to those planning to pursue graduate study or a closely related career. To receive certification in an area of specialization a student is expected to take at least four courses and at least 12 credits (included in the total hours of major) within that area. (Appropriate Independent Study courses can count.) The Areas of Specialization include: Law, Criminology, and Deviance; Economy, Business, and Society; Health, Aging, and Population; Social Welfare, Organizations, and Social Services; Social Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender; International Social Change; and Methods of Research.

Law, Criminology, and Deviance is particularly relevant to students considering careers or graduate study within law, criminal justice, and social work. Topics studied include law and society, the criminal justice system, deviance, and juvenile delinquency.

Economy, Business, and Society is especially useful for students planning graduate study or work within private industry and large public institutions. This area of specialization studies corporations, occupations, and the sociology of work.

Health, Aging, and Population considers issues of interest to students contemplating graduate work or careers in medicine and related fields ranging from hospital administration to gerontology to social work. The study of medical sociology, population trends, and health-related issues are emphasized.

The study of Social Welfare, Organizations, and Social Services is useful for those interested in social welfare, social work, the family, and urban institutions, including education.

The study of Social Inequality: Race, Class, and Gender emphasizes social problems related to inequality based on race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, ability, and class. It is useful for students considering a wide variety of career options or plans for graduate study.

International Social Change considers how social problems occur and are resolved, examining social movements in the United States and the rest of the world. Since social change affects all our lives and all the institutions with which we come into contact, such preparation is relevant to many future fields of study, employment, and lifework.

The Methods of Research area of specialization surveys various sociological approaches to social research. It offers students an opportunity to pursue advanced training in the area of research methods. This will benefit students considering careers in applied research settings, as well as, graduate and professional careers.

Faculty advisors are available to discuss the choice of sociology as a major, help you select your area of specialization in sociology, assist you in selecting required courses, and advise you on graduate study, career preparation, and other opportunities in the field.

Sociology Honors Program. The Honors Program allows the Sociology Department to combine some of the best features of a liberal arts college with those of a major research university. Honors classes are typically small and allow for interaction with faculty committed to undergraduate education. In addition, by writing a thesis, Honors students have the opportunity to do independent research under the supervision of scholars widely respected in their fields. The thesis both demonstrates the expertise students have developed in their undergraduate years and illustrates their capacity to contribute to a field of inquiry - especially important should they pursue advanced degrees. Thus, it stands as an emblem both of undergraduate achievement and of scholarly promise.

Equally important, Honors students find the opportunity to work in tandem with inventive and highly-motivated peers, a reward in itself. The sequence of thesis seminars provides a context in which students exchange information, provide support for one another's work, and offer feedback as projects develop.

Beyond these educational rewards, the pragmatic benefits of the Honors Program should not be ignored: independent research naturally looks good to graduate and professional schools, as does a recommendation from a professor who knows you well. A Michigan degree awarded "with Honors" (or perhaps "with highest Honors") catches the eye of prospective employers. And, of course, the completion of an independent project encourages the self-confidence that stands you in good stead whether you enter business, the professions, academe, or politics.

Students who enter the University in Honors or join it in their first two years may take Honors Principles of Sociology (Sociology 195), but the Program largely consists of a three-term sequence of seminars and guided research that culminates in the thesis. Students typically apply to the Sociology Honors Program as first-term juniors. (Because depth in a particular area of sociology may aid students in formulating and conducting their thesis research, the areas of specialization offered by the Department should be considered at this time).

The Program officially begins with Sociology 397 (3 credits) in the second term of the junior year and continues through the senior year with Sociology 398 (3 credits) and 399 (3 credits). During 398 and 399, students work with the supervision of their faculty mentors, while continuing to meet with the Honors coordinator.

Prerequisites: Typically Sociology Honors majors have at least a 3.3 GPA within LS&A and in their sociology courses. In addition, they already will have demonstrated originality in their own course work, shown a serious interest in scholarly research, and given evidence of their ability to work independently on a thesis. Students should plan on completing Sociology 210 (Statistics) or Statistics 402 prior to enrolling in Sociology 397 and should take Sociology 310 (Methods) concurrently with it. For most students this will mean that the statistics course should be taken as a first-term Junior. Both 210 and 310 should be completed before enrolling in 398 and 399.

To graduate with Honors, students must meet all general requirements for the major, complete Sociology 397, 398, and 399, and write an acceptable Honors thesis. Upon completion of this course work and dependent upon the evaluation of the thesis, the academic record and diploma will designate the degree awarded "with Honors," "with high Honors," or "with highest Honors."

Interested students should call the Sociology Undergraduate Program Office at 764-7239 to arrange an appointment with the Department's Honors Coordinator.


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