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Gregg Crane

Program Director, Professor of English Language and Literature and Environment

Mailing Address
1120 Undergraduate Science Building
204 Washtenaw Avenue
Ann Arbor MI 48109-2215

Office Location(s): 1120 USB
Phone: 734.615.7347
gdcrane@umich.edu

  • Affiliation(s)
    • College of Literature, Science and the Arts (LSA)
  • Fields of Study
    • Professor of English Language and Literature and Environment
  • About

    Professor Gregg Crane is serving as the director of PitE director for a three-year term through June 30, 2016. Professor Crane has been teaching ENVIRON 377, History and Literature of the Rockies at Camp Davis since 2007.  He is a specialist in American literary and intellectual history, and his current research focuses on the importance of intuition to a collection of literary, philosophical, legal, and environmental writers. In a previous life, Professor Crane practiced law in San Francisco and Seattle. His litigation experience included work on several major environmental cases in California and the State of Washington. 

    Professor Crane's publications include The Cambridge Introduction to the Nineteenth-Century American Novel (Cambridge University Press, 2007); Race, Citizenship, and Law in American Literature (Cambridge University Press, 2002); “Intuition: The ‘Unseen Thread’ Connecting Emerson and James,” Modern Intellectual History 10:1 (2013); "The Art of Judgment," American Literary History 23:3 (2011); "Law and the American Novel," Cambridge History of the American Novel (2010); "Reasonable Doubts: Crime and Punishment," American Literary History 18:4 (2006); "The Law and Literature Movement," The Oxford Companion to American Law, ed. Kermit Hall (Oxford University Press, 2002); "Stowe and the Law," The Cambridge Companion to Harriet Beecher Stowe, ed. Cindy Weinstein (Cambridge University Press, 2004); "Ralph Ellison's Constitutional Faith," The Cambridge Companion to Ralph Ellison, ed. Ross Posnock (Cambridge University Press, 2005); articles on nineteenth-century American literature, African American literature, and law and literature in American Literature, American Literary History, and Nineteenth-Century Literature.