Colorblind: How Not Seeing “Color” Actually Hinders Justice and Equality PM


Jan
22
2013

Add to Cal
  • Host Department: Theme Semester
  • Date: 01/22/2013
  • Time: 6:00 PM - 09:00 PM

  • Location: Sunward Cohousing Community Common House, 424 Little Lake Dr., Ann Arbor, MI 48103

  • Description:

    We often hear people adopt an approach of “colorblindness” and try to minimize or ignore “racial” differences. “I don’t even see color. We’re all just human and I treat everybody the same.” This month, we’ll explore this approach of ignoring race. Is it possible to truly be “colorblind?” How has this played out historically in the U.S., and how does “colorblindness” currently affect systems of education, employment, and criminal justice? Could it possibly do more harm than good?

    We invite community members to share their thoughts through a facilitated conversation. Please bring teens, a friend, your voice, and an open mind.  

    Refreshments will be served. RSVPs are not required, but appreciated for planning appropriately. RSVP to sablanks@umich.edu.

    We often hear people adopt an approach of “colorblindness” and try to minimize or ignore “racial” differences. “I don’t even see color. We’re all just human and I treat everybody the same.” This month, we’ll explore this approach of ignoring race. Is it possible to truly be “colorblind?” How has this played out historically in the U.S., and how does “colorblindness” currently affect systems of education, employment, and criminal justice? Could it possibly do more harm than good?

    We invite community members to share their thoughts through a facilitated conversation. Please bring teens, a friend, your voice, and an open mind.  

    Refreshments will be served. RSVPs are not required, but appreciated for planning appropriately. RSVP to sablanks@umich.edu.

    We often hear people adopt an approach of “colorblindness” and try to minimize or ignore “racial” differences. “I don’t even see color. We’re all just human and I treat everybody the same.” This month, we’ll explore this approach of ignoring race. Is it possible to truly be “colorblind?” How has this played out historically in the U.S., and how does “colorblindness” currently affect systems of education, employment, and criminal justice? Could it possibly do more harm than good?

    We invite community members to share their thoughts through a facilitated conversation. Please bring teens, a friend, your voice, and an open mind.  

    Refreshments will be served. RSVPs are not required, but appreciated for planning appropriately. RSVP to sablanks@umich.edu.

    We often hear people adopt an approach of “colorblindness” and try to minimize or ignore “racial” differences. “I don’t even see color. We’re all just human and I treat everybody the same.” This month, we’ll explore this approach of ignoring race. Is it possible to truly be “colorblind?” How has this played out historically in the U.S., and how does “colorblindness” currently affect systems of education, employment, and criminal justice? Could it possibly do more harm than good?

    We invite community members to share their thoughts through a facilitated conversation. Please bring teens, a friend, your voice, and an open mind.  

    Refreshments will be served. RSVPs are not required, but appreciated for planning appropriately. RSVP to sablanks@umich.edu.


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