CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR COMP LIT FACULTY 2011-2012!


By paulaf
May 29, 2012

TATJANA ALEKSIC published “Making Patriarchal History Women’s Own: Eugenia Fakinou’s The Seventh Garment” in Myth and Violence in Contemporary Female Text: New Cassandras (Ashgate, 2011).

CATHERINE BROWN published “Manuscript Thinking” in postmedieval 2.3 (2011), and “Remember the Hand: Bodies and Bookmaking in Early Medieval Spain” in Word and Image 27.3 (2011).

ALINA CLEJ was awarded a grant from the LSA Associate Professor Support Fund to pursue research for her book project, “Romanians in Paris and their Contributions to Literary and Artistic Modernity.”

SANTIAGO COLAS traveled to Texas and Georgia to deliver lectures on “Cultures of Basketball: Sports in Higher Education” and “The Meanings of Manu: Race, Class and Globalization in the National Basketball Association.”

BASIL DUFALLO presented a paper at the 2012 American Philological Association Annual Meeting in Philadelphia: “In the Image of Jupiter: Ecphrasis, Rape, and Greek Culture in Terence’s Eunuchus.”

FRIEDA EKOTTO published “Jean Genet, penseur de la Négritude” in Jean Genet: Lectures en héritage (Méthode, 2012), “Cinéates femmes d’Afrique, créatrices d’images poétique aux pluriels” in Loin des yeux près du corps: entre théorie et création (Montréal, 2012),  “Lydie Dattas, Angela Davis et Réception de Jean Genet aux USA” in Dictionnaire des femmes (Paris, 2012) and various entries in Dictionnaire universel du theatre femmes noires  (Paris, 2012).  She was named Faculty Fellow at the Institute for the Humanities for 2012-13.

DAVID HALPERIN was awarded the James Robert Brudner ’83 Memorial Prize for LGBT Studies and Activism by Yale University, and delivered the Brudner Memorial Lectures in Yale and New York.  There was a roundtable on his work at the meeting of the International Plato Society in Paris, and he gave the keynote address at the Sex Acher 2012 Conference in Tel Aviv.  

DANIEL HERWITZ published Heritage: Culture and Politics in the Postcolony (Columbia 2012).  

KADER KONUK was awarded a grant from the LSA Associate Professor Support Fund to pursue research for her book project on secular modernity in Turkey and Western Europe.  She published “Istanbul on Fire: End-of-Empire Melancholy in Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul,” The Germanic Review: Literature, Culture, Theory 86:4 (2011) and “Hüzün als Melancholie der Endzeit in Orhan Pamuks Istanbul-Memoiren” in Plurale Topographie Europas (Kadmos, 2012).  

VASSILIS LAMBROPOULOS published “Farewell to the Revolution!” in Manolis Anagnostakis:  Poetry and Politics, Silence and Agency in Post-War Greece (Fairleigh Dickinson, 2012) and presented a lecture/recital series sponsored by the Onassis Foundation, entitled “C. P. Cavafy in Music:  A Recital of Songs and Reflections.”

TOMOKO MASUZAWA published “The University and the Advent of the Academic Secular: The State’s Management of Public Instruction” in Law after Secularism (Stanford, 2011) and “An American Secular: Religion and the University Reform before the Postsecular Age,” in The Postsecular in Question: Religion in Contemporary Society (NYU Press, 2011).

PEGGY McCRACKEN received a Michigan Humanities Award for Winter 2012, and in February 2012 she was Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at UCLA.  She published as co-author (with Sharon Kinoshita) Marie de France: A Critical Companion (Boydell, 2012).  

CHRISTI MERRILL was awarded a grant from the LSA Associate Professor Support Fund to pursue research for her book project, “Genres of Real Life.”
She published “The Lyricism of Violence: Faith in Revolution” in boundary 2.  (Fall 2011) and in March 2012 she was awarded the A.K. Ramanujan
Prize for Translation by the South Asica Committee of the Association of Asian Studies, for her translations of Vijaydan Detha. She also received a Gilbert Whitaker Award for the Improvement of Teaching, to conduct a faculty seminar on critical issues in the translation classroom, in conjunction with the Fall 2012 LSA Theme Semester on Translation.

BENJAMIN PALOFF published two book-length translations from Polish:  
Krzysztof Michalski, The Flame of Eternity: An Interpretation of Nietzsche’s Thought (Princeton University Press, 2011) and Marek Bienczyk, Transparency (Dalkey Archive Press, 2012).

DAVID PORTER was a 2011-12 Fellow at the UM Institute for the Humanities, and published “The Crisis of Comparison and The World Literature Debates” (in Professsion 2011). He also curated an exhibit and gave a public lecture on chinoiserie at the Milwaukee Art Museum.  

YOPIE PRINS published “’Break, Break, Break’ into Song” in Meter Matters: Verse Cultures of the Long Nineteenth Century (Ohio 2012) and presented a series of guest lectures at Yale, Harvard, Montclair State, Columbia, Drew University, and at Poets House in New York.  At the 2012 meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association she participated in a panel discussion, “Challenges and Successes: How Comp Lit Departments Thrive.”

GAYLE RUBIN published Deviations: A Gayle Rubin Reader (Duke, 2011), and she was a 2011-12 Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University.  

ANTON SHAMMAS published “The Nightmare of the Translator,” in Reflections on Islamic Art (Qatar 2011), in Arabic & English.  In April 2012, he presented two lectures at the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard University.

XIAOBING TANG was a 2011-12 Fellow at the UM Institute for the Humanities. He curated an exhibition on contemporary Chinese Woodblock Prints at the University of Michigan Museum of Art (July 16-October 23, 2011). He edited the exhibition catalogue, Multiple Impressions: Contemporary Chinese Woodblock Prints” (University of Washington Press, 2011), which includes his translation of an essay from Chinese, and his introductory essay, “Continual Experimentation in Modern Chinese Printmaking.”

RUTH TSOFFAR was awarded a grant from the LSA Associate Professor Support Fund to pursue research for her book project, “Cannibal Ideology: Food and the Allegorical Space of Reading in Hebrew Literature.”

SILKE-MARIA WEINECK received a Michigan Humanities Award for Winter 2012.