"Should Feminists Stop Talking About Culture? Law and "Honour" Killings in Canada and Europe," Talk by Sherene Razack


Feb
26
2013

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  • Host Department: Theme Semester
  • Date: 02/26/2013
  • Time: 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM

  • Location: 2239 Lane Hall, 204 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

  • Description:

    The violence, scale, and power of organized internet-based circulation of anti-Muslim narratives continue to have considerable impact on feminist antiviolence initiatives.   Razack will examine contemporary European and North American responses to “honour" killings, reflecting on how antiviolence advocates continue to emphasize legal responses to violence that culturalize violence and discourage more-effective community-based reform. She asks whether the legal focus on culture has any impact on how courts and society view violence committed by Muslim men and sometimes women against Muslim women.

    Sherene Razack's research and teaching interests lie in the area of race and gender issues in the law. Her books include an edited collection, Race, Space and the Law: Unmapping a White Settler Society(Toronto: Between the Lines, 2002), Looking White People in the Eye: Gender, Race, and Culture in Courtrooms and Classrooms (Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 1998, 1999, 2000) and Canadian Feminism and the Law: The Women's Legal and Education Fund and the Pursuit of Equality (Toronto: Second Story Press, 1991). She has also published articles on Canadian national mythologies and immigration policies of the 1990s, race, space and prostitution, and gendered racism.
    Sherene Razack is Professor of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Social Justice Education in the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto.

     

    This lecture is a presentation of IRWG's Transitions and Ruptures program and part of the Understanding Race Theme semester. It is cosponsored by Arab American Studies and the Center for Middle East and North African Studies.