John Jackson

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John Jackson

Professor Emeritus of Political Science
Formerly M. Kent Jennings Collegiate Professor of Political Science

Office Location(s): 7766 Haven Hall
734.763.2216
jjacksn@umich.edu
View Curriculum Vitae

  • Affiliation(s)
    • Center for Political Studies
  • Fields of Study
    • Research Methods
    • Political Economy
  • About

    Professor Jackson's major interest is the creation, evolution, and growth of market economies, with a concentration on the dynamics of firm creation, growth, and death. He is modeling these processes to understand how a wide variety of economic, political, and sociological factors affect these dynamics. The research integrates concepts from industrial organization, organizational ecology, dynamic systems, and econometrics. The subject matter ranges from an intensive study of Michigan's economy between 1978 and the present, to studies comparing U.S. states in the 1970's and 1980's, to data collections and analysis in Ukraine, Poland, and Russia. A second interest is the development and statistical estimation of models of the dynamics of two-party electoral competition in a situation where voters' preferences are endogenous and where political parties have multi-valued objective functions. Early results indicate that these extensions lead to quite different electoral processes and outcomes. Professor Jackson's methodological interests focus on evolutionary models with path dependent properties and the implication of those models for empirical analysis. Those models are increasingly being applied to the study of economic and political institutions, but we have a poor idea of how to test propositions derived from these models.

  • Education
    • Harvard University, Ph.D. (Political Economy and Government)
    • Harvard University, M. P. A. (Public Administration)
    • Carnegie-Mellon University, M.S. (Industrial Management)
    • Carnegie-Mellon University, B.A. (Industrial Management)
  • Courses Taught
    • Statistical Methods for Political Science Research (graduate)
    • Selected Topics (graduate)
    • Quantitative Methods of Political Analysis (undergraduate)