HISTORY 196 - First Year Seminar in Social Sciences
Fall 2017, Section 002 - History of Our Own Times
Instruction Mode: Section 002 is (see other Sections below)
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
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Details

Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
SS
Other:
FYSem
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Consent:
With permission of department.
Advisory Prerequisites:
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing.
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Description

As we enter a new, potentially exciting, and unpredictable historical period, the younger generations face seemingly insoluble problems. Among the issues that they will face are the costs and benefits of economic globalization, the rise of religious conflict, the potentially waning power of the United States and the rise of China, the failure of the transitions to democracy in much of the world, and the tragedies of war, genocide, and poverty endemic to the underdeveloped world. This course will explore the roots and evolution of political philosophies and social and political formations that have established the structures and discourses in which our world operates at the present time. There will be a historical dimension to the lectures and discussions, but each topic will be brought up to the present time. Readings will be both historical and contemporary. The topics of the lectures and discussions will be the following:

I. HISTORY
II. MODERNITY
III. CAPITALISM
IV. THE STATE
V. REVOLUTION
VI. LIBERALISM
VII. CONSERVATISM
VIII. SOCIALISM
IX. NATIONALISM
X. IMPERIALISM
XI. WAR
XII. DEMOCRACY
XIII. GLOBALIZATION
XIV. AMERICA
XV. OUR OWN TIMES

Among the readings will be primary sources in the various political philosophies (e.g., Locke, Burke, Mazzini, Marx) as well as secondary works that have shaped the discussions of some of these topics (e.g., Benedict Anderson on nationalism, Joseph Stiglitz on globalization, Anatole Lieven on American nationalism).

Class Format:

This section will be taught through lectures and discussions. A normal pattern might be a lecture on Tuesday and a discussion based on the reading on Thursday.

Schedule

HISTORY 196 - First Year Seminar in Social Sciences
Schedule Listing
001 (SEM)
 In Person
25424
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
002 (SEM)
 In Person
29738
Closed
0
1Y1
-
TuTh 11:30AM - 1:00PM
004 (SEM)
 In Person
30066
Closed
0
4Y1
-
TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
005 (SEM)
 In Person
32299
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 10:00AM - 11:30AM

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Syllabi

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