HISTORY 230 - Humanities Topics in History
Winter 2021, Section 002 - How to be a Dictator: Idi Amin in Uganda?s History
Instruction Mode: Section 002 is  Online (see other Sections below)
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
See additional student enrollment and course instructor information to guide you in your decision making.

Details

Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Cost:
50-100
Repeatability:
May be elected five times for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Description

Idi Amin was one of history’s most idiosyncratic dictators. As president of Uganda between 1971 and 1979 he earned an international reputation as ‘The Butcher of Uganda’, and as many as 300,000 Ugandans are said to have perished under his brutal rule. In any catalogue of dictators of the 20th century, Amin is near the top, alongside Hitler, Pol Pot, and Stalin. Within Uganda, though, Amin was regarded by many as a hero: a pioneering nationalist who played a key role in re-engineering the country’s economy and expanding its international role. In this introductory course, we’ll study how Amin’s regime generated support, created consensus, and unified Ugandans around the president’s program. Our focus will largely be on the media—radio, television, and print—by which the Amin government set the tempo of public life. We’ll explore the ‘Economic War’, by which the Amin regime expelled Indians and Pakistanis and replaced them with black businessmen. We’ll explore Amin’s foreign engagements, his efforts to bring anti-imperialism home to Uganda. And we’ll look at the gender politics of the Amin government. Students will work with a wide range of historical materials that the Amin government generated. We’ll look at the thousands of pictures made by Idi Amin’s personal photographers. We’ll listen to radio addresses made by President Amin and broadcast over Radio Uganda. We’ll watch a televised film broadcast by Uganda Television. And we’ll read through a great number of archival files created by government officials. By the end of the course, students will have learned how to interpret evidence, synthesize disparate sources, and create compelling arguments.

Course Requirements:

Three short (3-5 page) essays and one longer (7-8 pages) essay.

Intended Audience:

This is an introductory course. Anyone interested in the history of modern Africa is welcome.

Class Format:

Lecture and film/media work once a week; and seminar-style discussion once a week.

Schedule

HISTORY 230 - Humanities Topics in History
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 Online
30508
Open
2
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
Note: Remote with a blend of synchronous and asynchronous instruction.
002 (LEC)
 Online
30509
Open
14
 
-
TuTh 8:30AM - 10:00AM
Note: Remote with synchronous instruction.
003 (LEC)
 Online
27961
Open
5
 
-
TBA
Note: Lecture is remote and asynchronous; sections (004 and 005) are remote and synchronous.
004 (DIS)
 Online
28285
Open
5
 
-
F 10:00AM - 11:00AM
005 (DIS)
 Online
28286
Open
0
 
-
Th 4:00PM - 5:00PM
006 (LEC)
 Online
33295
Open
2
 
-
MW 1:00PM - 2:30PM
Note: Remote with synchronous instruction.
007 (LEC)
 Online
33296
Open
10
 
-
MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
008 (DIS)
 Online
36246
Closed
0
 
-
F 10:00AM - 11:00AM
010 (LEC)
 Online
30684
Open
6
 
-
TuTh 2:30PM - 4:00PM
Note: This course will be remote with synchronous instruction. Students are expected to be available during scheduled class times.
011 (DIS)
 Online
30819
Open
2
 
-
Tu 4:00PM - 5:00PM
012 (DIS)
 Online
30820
Open
2
 
-
W 9:00AM - 10:00AM
013 (DIS)
 Online
30821
Open
2
 
-
W 10:00AM - 11:00AM
020 (LEC)
 Online
33770
Open
18
 
-
TBA
Note: Remote with asynchronous instruction.
021 (LEC)
 Online
33787
Open
12
 
-
W 2:30PM - 4:00PM
TBA
022 (LEC)
 Online
37972
Open
11
 
-
MW 2:30PM - 4:00PM

Textbooks/Other Materials

The partner U-M / Barnes & Noble Education textbook website is the official way for U-M students to view their upcoming textbook or course material needs, whether they choose to buy from Barnes & Noble Education or not. Students also can view a customized list of their specific textbook needs by clicking a "View/Buy Textbooks" link in their course schedule in Wolverine Access.

Click the button below to view and buy textbooks for HISTORY 230.002

View/Buy Textbooks

Syllabi

Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

Click the button below to view historical syllabi for HISTORY 230 (UM login required)

View Historical Syllabi

CourseProfile (Atlas)

The Atlas system, developed by the Center for Academic Innovation, provides additional information about: course enrollments; academic terms and instructors; student academic profiles (school/college, majors), and previous, concurrent, and subsequent course enrollments.

CourseProfile (Atlas)