HISTORY 262 - The American South
Winter 2021, Section 001 - A History of Race and Culture since Reconstruction
Instruction Mode: Section 001 is  Online (see other Sections below)
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
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Details

Credits:
4
Requirements & Distribution:
SS, RE
Repeatability:
May not be repeated for credit.
Primary Instructor:

Description

Martin Luther King, Jr., Hank Williams, and Beyoncé. The Civil War, the Civil Rights Movement, and Confederate monuments. The U.S. South has often been at the center of the major historical and cultural events of the 20th century and into the present. Culturally, the region has been the birthplace of American music (from blues and country to rock and roll and hip hop), the home of great literature, and the source of various religious, culinary, and other traditions. Politically, the region has been a site of intense conflicts over race, citizenship, and memory. In this course, we will explore the cultures of the South and situate them within a historical context. We will consider the various every day and expressive cultural forms that emerged from segregation and black protests, from working-class life, from Asian and Latin American migrations, from interactions with the rest of the nation, and from numerous other economic, political, and demographic transformations in the twentieth century. With a central interest in the race, we will also consider how the region’s racial and cultural developments have regularly intersected with the ideas and practices of gender, class, ethnicity, and nation. Throughout the semester, two broad questions will regularly guide our readings and conversations: What is the relationship between race and culture in the South? In what ways is the South unique from other regions and in what ways is it emblematic of the larger nation?

Course Requirements:

A midterm and final examination, short assignments in discussion sections, and a paper analyzing a product of Southern culture.

Intended Audience:

All are welcome. No prior coursework in history is required.

Class Format:

A combination of lectures and discussions, with each drawing extensively on multimedia forms (music, film/television clips, photographs, etc.)

Schedule

HISTORY 262 - The American South
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 Online
23829
Open
4
 
-
MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
Note: Remote with a blend of synchronous and asynchronous instruction.
002 (DIS)
 Online
23830
Closed
0
 
-
M 1:00PM - 2:00PM
003 (DIS)
 Online
23831
Closed
0
 
-
M 1:00PM - 2:00PM
004 (DIS)
 Online
23832
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 9:00AM - 10:00AM
005 (DIS)
 Online
23833
Open
2
 
-
Tu 9:00AM - 10:00AM
006 (DIS)
 Online
23834
Open
1
 
-
Tu 10:00AM - 11:00AM
007 (DIS)
 Online
23835
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 11:00AM - 12:00PM
008 (DIS)
 Online
31931
Open
1
 
-
Tu 11:00AM - 12:00PM
009 (DIS)
 Online
31932
Closed
0
 
-
M 2:00PM - 3:00PM

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Syllabi

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CourseProfile (Atlas)

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CourseProfile (Atlas)