SI 605 - Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Fall 2021, Section 001 - Most states ratified the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol, yet refugees' rights are routinely ignored. Borders are often closed, and refugees allowed to enter live in camps or slums with few opportunities, waiting decades for a solution to their displacement. States are not incentivized to share obligations; in fact, states regularly deter refugees from arriving or staying. Students will leverage insights from fields including the social sciences, market design, law, and ethics to develop innovative solutions promoting fair and legally sustainable treatment of refugees.
Instruction Mode: Section 001 is  In Person (see other Sections below)
Subject: Information (SI)
Department: School of Information
See additional student enrollment and course instructor information to guide you in your decision making.

Description

"Interdisciplinary Problem Solving" is a course offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) Through a team-based, experiential, and interdisciplinary learning model, small groups of U-M graduate and professional students work with faculty to explore and offer solutions to emerging, complex problems.

Schedule

SI 605 - Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Schedule Listing
001 (LAB)
 In Person
32973
Closed
0
 
-
W 3:15PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Most states ratified the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol, yet refugees' rights are routinely ignored. Borders are often closed, and refugees allowed to enter live in camps or slums with few opportunities, waiting decades for a solution to their displacement. States are not incentivized to share obligations; in fact, states regularly deter refugees from arriving or staying. Students will leverage insights from fields including the social sciences, market design, law, and ethics to develop innovative solutions promoting fair and legally sustainable treatment of refugees. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Non-law graduate/professional students may apply for the course using the PSI application system (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) March 15-30, 2021. After the initial application period, students seeking to apply can contact problemsolving@umich.edu.
002 (LAB)
 In Person
32981
Open
1
 
-
W 3:15PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Students come to graduate and professional school energized and eager to learn. How does graduate school transform so many students into anxious and overwhelmed learners? How can we reimagine graduate education in a way that supports both rigorous education and wellbeing? Applying problem solving tools, students from law, education, social work, the humanities, and other fields will grapple with how to redesign the university to help graduate students flourish to address this structural challenge. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Non-law graduate/professional students may apply for the course using the PSI application system (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) March 15-30, 2021. After the initial application period, students seeking to apply can contact problemsolving@umich.edu.
003 (LAB)
 In Person
32989
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 3:15PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Although the rate of incarceration for women, especially women of color, has grown at a higher rate than for men in recent decades, such gender bias issues receive little attention. Further, Michigan does a poor job with cases involving crimes against abusers or committed by victims under duress. Using problem solving tools, multi-disciplinary teams will explore why survivors are overlooked by our criminal-legal system, drawing on insights from social work, gender studies, humanities, sciences, policy, and law to develop innovative ways to challenge criminalization of survivors of violence. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Non-law graduate/professional students may apply for the course using the PSI application system (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) March 15-30, 2021. After the initial application period, students seeking to apply can contact problemsolving@umich.edu.
004 (LAB)
 In Person
32997
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 3:15PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). Each year, millions of people are victims of identity theft. Such theft can take many forms, including tax fraud or mail identity fraud, with devastating consequences. What makes identity theft possible, how do identity thieves operate, how are victims harmed, and how can they recover? We will explore identity theft causes, mechanics, harms, and countermeasures with lectures, expert guests, research, and class activities. Multidisciplinary teams of students from information, policy, law, engineering, and other fields will craft countermeasures addressing the problem of identity theft. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Non-law graduate/professional students may apply for the course using the PSI application system (https://problemsolving.law.umich.edu/) March 15-30, 2021. After the initial application period, students seeking to apply can contact problemsolving@umich.edu.
005 (LAB)
 In Person
37112
Open
3
 
-
W 3:15PM - 6:30PM
Note: This class is an interdisciplinary problem solving class offered at the Law School through the Problem Solving Initiative (PSI). The built environment bears the stamp of slavery supported by new forms of forced labor. Starting with an understanding that architecture is not value-neutral, that racism intersects with urban planning, land use, and environmental problems, this class will confront such issues through a U-M/Yale partnership. Students will create a framework for the National Slavery Memorial in Washington, D.C., as multidisciplinary teams from law, planning, history, and other fields learn problem solving skills, conduct research, and approach the politics, ethics, and mechanics of construction holistically. This class is open to all University of Michigan graduate and professional students. Please note: Non-Law students are responsible for checking with their own schools, colleges, or units to learn if a PSI class will count toward graduation or other departmental requirements. Non-law graduate/professional students seeking to apply should contact problemsolving@umich.edu.

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Syllabi

Syllabi are available to current LSA students. IMPORTANT: These syllabi are provided to give students a general idea about the courses, as offered by LSA departments and programs in prior academic terms. The syllabi do not necessarily reflect the assignments, sequence of course materials, and/or course expectations that the faculty and departments/programs have for these same courses in the current and/or future terms.

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CourseProfile (Atlas)

The Atlas system, developed by the Center for Academic Innovation, provides additional information about: course enrollments; academic terms and instructors; student academic profiles (school/college, majors), and previous, concurrent, and subsequent course enrollments.

CourseProfile (Atlas)