HISTORY 230 - Humanities Topics in History
Winter 2022, Section 001 - How to be a Dictator: Idi Amin in Uganda?s History
Instruction Mode: Section 001 is  In Person (see other Sections below)
Subject: History (HISTORY)
Department: LSA History
See additional student enrollment and course instructor information to guide you in your decision making.

Details

Credits:
3
Requirements & Distribution:
HU
Waitlist Capacity:
unlimited
Cost:
50-100
Repeatability:
May be elected five times for credit.
Primary Instructor:
Start/End Date:
Full Term 1/5/22 - 4/19/22 (see other Sections below)
NOTE: Drop/Add deadlines are dependent on the class meeting dates and will differ for full term versus partial term offerings.
For information on drop/add deadlines, see the Office of the Registrar and search Registration Deadlines.

Description

Idi Amin was one of history's most infamous dictators. As president of Uganda between 1971 and 1979 he earned an international reputation as "The Butcher of Uganda," and as many as 300,000 people are said to have perished under his brutal rule. In any catalogue of dictators of the twentieth century, Amin is near the top, alongside Hitler, Pol Pot, and Stalin.

Within Uganda, though, Amin was regarded by many as a hero: a pioneering nationalist who played a key role in re-engineering the country's economy and expanding its international role. In this course we'll study how Amin's regime generated support, created consensus, and unified Ugandans around the president's program. Our focus will be on the media—radio, television, and print—by which the Amin government set the tempo of public life. We'll be working with a wide range of historical materials that the Amin government generated. We'll look at the thousands of pictures made by Idi Amin's personal photographers. We'll listen to radio addresses made by President Amin and broadcast over Radio Uganda. We'll watch televised film. And we'll read though a great number of archival files created by government officials.

By the end of the semester I hope that you'll have gained insight into how dictatorships work, how they command consent and shape people's sense of place, time, and history. And—I hope—you will have learned how to think like a historian: how to mine usable information from unfaithful, self-interested, self-inflating, propagandistic source material. These are skills that are as consequential for us, in twenty-first century America, as at any time in our history.

Course Requirements:

Three short (3-5 page) essays and one longer (7-8 pages) essay.

Intended Audience:

This is an introductory course and is open to any students, including majors and non-majors

Class Format:

Lecture and seminar-style discussion

Schedule

HISTORY 230 - Humanities Topics in History
Schedule Listing
001 (LEC)
 In Person
29068
Open
3
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
1/5/22 - 4/19/22
003 (LEC)
 In Person
26539
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM
1/5/22 - 4/19/22
004 (LEC)
 In Person
26858
Closed
0
 
-
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:30PM
1/5/22 - 4/19/22
005 (LEC)
 In Person
26859
Open
7
 
-
MW 10:00AM - 11:30AM
1/5/22 - 4/19/22
010 (LEC)
 In Person
29244
Open
11
 
-
MW 11:30AM - 1:00PM
1/5/22 - 4/19/22
011 (DIS)
 In Person
29378
Open
2
 
-
M 1:00PM - 2:00PM
1/5/22 - 4/19/22
012 (DIS)
 In Person
29379
Open
9
 
-
Tu 9:00AM - 10:00AM
1/5/22 - 4/19/22
013 (DIS)
 In Person
29380
Closed
0
 
-
Tu 10:00AM - 11:00AM
1/5/22 - 4/19/22

Textbooks/Other Materials

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Syllabi

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CourseProfile (Atlas)

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CourseProfile (Atlas)