Awards & Fellowships

The following fellowships support doctoral students in economics. Some fellowships are available to incoming students. All students accepted for admission will be considered for these awards. There is no separate application process for these fellowships. Application procedures for fellowships for advanced students are provided through the department’s intranet site.

The Gardner Ackley Fellowship

The Gardner Ackley Fellowship is to fund graduate student fellowships in Economics.

The Gardner Ackley Fellowship Fund was established in 1984 through gifts from: Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Paschke, Mr. and Mrs. Millard H. Pryor, Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Schiff, Charles L. Schultze, and Dr. John S. and Mrs. Winifred M. Wyman. Gardner Ackley, PhD ’40 econ, taught in the Department for 43 years, serving as chair, 1954-1961. Ackley was  a member of the Council of Economic Advisers under President John F. Kennedy, serving as the chairman under President Lyndon B. Johnson. He served as Ambassador to Italy between 1968 and 1969, and as President of the American Economic Association in 1982.

The Henry Carter Adams Scholarship in Economics

The Henry Carter Adams Scholarship in Economics is for graduate students in economics.

Established in 1977 from a gift of Mary E. O. Adams for the purpose of establishing an endowment fund for the use of its Economics Department with the income to be used for scholarships in memory of Henry Carter Adams, first professor of political economy at the University of Michigan and first chairman of the Department of Economics. His professorial career at U-M spanned 41 years. Adams was part of a group that founded the American Economic Association in 1885. He served as the fourth president of the AEA.

The Peter and Julie Borish Fellowship Award

The Peter and Julie Borish Fellowship Awards are awarded to first-year PhD students who show great promise as future scholars and teachers and who are interested in policy-oriented economic issues.

Established in 2006 from a gift of Peter, AB ’81 econ; MPP ’82, and Julie Borish,  two Borish Awards shall be made each year for five years, one award each year to a student in the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy and one award to a student in the Department of Economics.

Jordan and Kim Dickstein Department of Economics African Initiative Fund

The Jordan and Kim Dickstein African Initiative Fund supports undergraduate or graduate students within the Department of Economics.

This fund was established through a gift from  Jordan, AB ’84 econ, and Kim Dickstein.

The Mark and Lindsay Harms Fund

The Mark and Lindsay Harms Fund is to support graduate students in the Department of Economics.

Established in 2008 through a gift from Mark, AB ’83 poli sci, and Lindsay Harms.

The Verne G. Istock Economics Graduate Student Support Fund

The Verne G. Istock Economics Graduate Student Support Fund is for graduate education in the Department of Economics.

Established in 2007 from a gift of Verne G.(AB ’62 econ; Bus Ad, MBA ’63) and Judy(Education ABED ’62) Istock, monies from this fund may be used to supplement other sources of support and will be awarded to students in the graduate program in the Department of Economics.

The James A. Miller Fund

The James A. Miller Fund is to be used for graduate student support in the Economics Department.

Established in 2007 through a gift from James A. Miller, AB ’71 econ.

The Michael J. Moore Dissertation Fellowship in Economics

The Moore Dissertation Prize is a $1,000 award presented annually to support the research phase of the dissertation process.  To be eligible, the student must be a candidate and have a written dissertation plan approved by at least two members of his/her committee.  The student's topic must belong to the general area of Applied Microeconomics and must involve both empirical analysis and issues of public policy as an essential part of the research agenda.  If no paper reaches this threshold of excellence, no award is given.

Established in 1995 from a gift of Michael J. Moore, MA ’82 econ; PhD ’84 econ, to fully endow the Michael J. Moore Dissertation Fellowship in Economics.

The Robert V. Roosa Dissertation Fellowship in Monetary Economics

Doctoral students who expect to complete their degree in the next academic year but have not yet completed their sixth year of the program are eligible to apply for nomination for the Robert V. Roosa Dissertation Fellowship in Monetary Economics.   For the purpose of this award, "Monetary Economics" is to be interpreted broadly to include international finance, money and banking, monetary theory and policy, and the analysis of financial markets.  The Robert V. Roosa Dissertation Fellowship in Monetary Economics is a highly competitive award program that covers tuition for three terms, GradCare health insurance, and a stipend of $21,600.   There is one recipient of this departmental award every other year. 

Established in 1988 through a gift from Dr. Robert V. Roosa, PhD ’42 econ, who served as undersecretary of the treasury for monetary affairs (1961-64) and was a Wall Street investment banker.

The Ryoichi Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowships

Fellowships are used to support outstanding first-year and candidate-level students.

The Ryoichi Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowship Fund Program (SYLFF) was established in 1987 by The Nippon Foundation to provide fellowships to students enrolled in masters and doctoral degree programs around the world in social sciences, humanities, and the performing arts. The University of Michigan Department of Economics has been a participant in the SYLFF program since 1991.

The I.L. Sharfman Economics Fellowship Fund

A committee of friends and colleagues established the I. Leo Sharfman Fellowship Fund as an endowment fund. The income from this fund, along with annual contributions to it, provides for a graduate fellowship in economics.

I.L. Sharfman’s career at the University of Michigan began in 1912 following his education at Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He retired in 1955 after 43 years of continuous service. His recognitions of merit at Michigan were many—including Chairmanship of the Department of Economics for 25 years and appointments as Rackham Research Professor, Henry Carter Adams distinguished professor and Russel Lecturer.

The Fred M. Taylor Award in Economic Theory

Doctoral students who expect to complete their degree in the next academic year but have not yet completed their sixth year of the program are eligible to apply for nomination for the Fred M. Taylor Fellowship in Economic Theory.  For the purpose of this award, "Economic Theory" is to be interpreted broadly.  The Fred M. Taylor Fellowship in Economic Theory is a highly competitive award program that covers tuition for three terms, GradCare health insurance, and a stipend of $21,600.   There is one recipient of this departmental award every other year. 

In 1892, the regents appointed Fred M. Taylor assistant professor of political economy, making him the second professor in the department (Henry Carter Adams being the first). In 1921, Taylor was appointment as successor to Adams (who had retired) as department chair. Taylor served as chair from 1921-1924. Taylor’s textbook Principles of Economics would have nine editions between 1911 and 1925. He retired in 1929.

The Gail R. Wilensky Fellowship in Health Economics

This fellowship provides full tuition and stipend support to a candidate-level economics Ph.D. student who is doing research in the area of health economics. 

The fellowship is made possible by a gift from Dr. Gail Wilensky, AB ’64 psych; AM ’65 econ; PhD ’68 econ.

The Wladimir S. and Emma S. Woytinsky Fellowship Fund

This fellowship is for graduate students preparing their PhD in the field of economics and/or statistics, preferably in the second or third year of their study. The fellowship should be awarded by the Department of Economics on the recommendation of its fellowship committee on the merit of the applicant’s work, without particular attention to the financial status of his/her parents.

Economists Wladimir Savelievich Woytinsky and his wife Emma emigrated to the United States from Russia in 1933. Wladimir became one of the architects of the Social Security system and was the principal economist of the Social Security Board, where he served until 1947. He wrote two books with his wife, World Population and Production (1953) and World Commerce and Government (1955). His autobiography, Stormy Passage, was published in 1961. The Special Collections Library in the Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library at the University of Michigan houses Wladimir’s writings, 1905-1960.