Major: Classical Languages and Literatures


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Classical Studies concentrations +

Advising

Students interested in the Department's concentration programs in Ancient Greek, Latin, Classical Languages and Literatures, Classical Archaeology, Classical Civilization, or Modern Greek Studies  should check with the Department office for the name of the current advisor. Students interested in obtaining a Teacher Certification in Latin should see Professor Deborah Ross. The Department recommends that interested students see the undergraduate advisors as early as possible in order to plan their programs and avoid unnecessary scheduling conflicts.

 

Classical Studies Honors concentrations +

Effective Date of Honors concentration requirements Fall 2006

The department offers Honors in each of the six concentrations. Interested students who have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 should contact their concentration advisor to discuss an Honors thesis no later than the winter term of their junior year at the latest.

It is the student's responsibility to find a suitable faculty advisor to oversee the thesis project. This project and its components are to be decided collectively by the student and the advisor at the end of the junior year. We encourage students to think creatively about the approach to their research and thesis project. Thesis advisors must sign off on a student's thesis project proposal.

Honors students may receive six credits during their senior year for research culminating in a thesis project by registering for one of the following courses: CLARCH 495, CLCIV 495, GREEK 495 or LATIN 495 depending on the concentration. At the end of the thesis project, the candidate must offer an oral defense of this work to a committee comprised of the thesis advisor and another faculty member, and present their research findings at the Classical Studies Honors Symposium.

Additional requirements for Honors candidates are specified with each concentration below.

Classical Languages and Literatures Major

 Effective Date of concentration Fall 2012

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

The skills taught in Latin and Greek are useful in many ways. The critical thinking and analytical skills (gleaned from a thorough knowledge of Latin and Greek) will benefit you in any class you take at the university. Students interested in subjects in the sciences and engineering will find the development of these skills invaluable. All students can benefit from improved English skills, particularly those students interested in Communications, Journalism, Law, and all the Humanities. Many students find Latin and Greek so helpful and fascinating that they choose these languages as a concentration or academic minor. Learning Latin and Greek is no more difficult than learning Spanish or French. We teach time-saving language learning strategies and skills in a highly structure format.  Because these are ancient languages, we focus primarily only on reading texts. Our department provides free "drop-in" tutoring available to all students in the Elementary Latin and Greek courses. See Ancient Greek Language and Literature and Latin Language and Literature, below.

Concentration Program.

The concentration requires study of both Greek and Latin; the student chooses one language as the major language for the purpose of determining requirements. The student takes a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) including:

  1. In the major language at least 3 courses at the 400-level or above; 300-level courses count toward the concentration in the major language only.
  2. In the minor language, at least one course at the 400-level or above.
  3. Two courses selected from CLARCH (221 or 222), CLCIV (101, 102 or 302), or HISTORY (200 or 201).

Three credits of Independent Study (GREEK 499 and LATIN 499) may be used with written approval of the undergraduate advisor.

Honors Concentration.

In addition to the Honors concentration requirements stated above, Honors candidates must take one course, above course level 420, in either Greek or Latin.

Classical Languages and Literatures concentration (Fall 2005-Summer 2012) +

 Effective Date of concentration Fall 2005-Summer 2012

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

The skills taught in Latin and Greek are useful in many ways. The critical thinking and analytical skills (gleaned from a thorough knowledge of Latin and Greek) will benefit you in any class you take at the university. Students interested in subjects in the sciences and engineering will find the development of these skills invaluable. All students can benefit from improved English skills, particularly those students interested in Communications, Journalism, Law, and all the Humanities. Many students find Latin and Greek so helpful and fascinating that they choose these languages as a concentration or academic minor. Learning Latin and Greek is no more difficult than learning Spanish or French. We teach time-saving language learning strategies and skills in a highly structure format.  As these are ancient languages, we focus primarily only on reading texts. Our department provides free "drop-in" tutoring available to all students in the Elementary Latin and Greek courses. See Ancient Greek Language and Literature and Latin Language and Literature, below.

Concentration Program.

The concentration requires study of both Greek and Latin; the student chooses one language as the major language for the purpose of determining requirements. The student takes a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) including:

  1. In the major language at least 3 courses at the 400-level or above; 300-level courses count toward the concentration in the major language only.
  2. In the minor language, at least one course at the 400-level or above.
  3. Two courses selected from CLARCH (221 or 222), CLCIV (101 or 102), or HISTORY (200 or 201).

Three credits of Independent Study (GREEK 499 and LATIN 499) may be used with written approval of the undergraduate advisor.

Honors Concentration.

 In addition to the Honors concentration requirements stated above, Honors candidates must take one course, above course level 420, in either Greek or Latin.

Classical Languages and Literatures concentration (Effective through Summer 2005) +

Effective through Summer 2005 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Concentration Program. The concentration requires study of both Greek and Latin; the student chooses one language as the major language for the purpose of determining requirements. The student takes a minimum of 9 courses (of at least 3 credits each) including:

  1. In the major language at least 3 courses at the 400-level or above; 300-level courses count toward the concentration in the major language only.
  2. In the minor language, at least one course at the 400-level or above.
  3. Two courses selected from CLARCH (221 or 222), CLCIV (101 or 102), or HISTORY (200 or 201).

Three credits of Independent Study (GREEK 499 and LATIN 499) may be used with written approval of the undergraduate advisor.

Honors Concentration. In addition to the concentration requirements stated above, students must complete an Honors thesis and a reading list in their senior year.


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