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Effective Fall 2011

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Prerequisites to Concentration. Two courses chosen from different subfields of political science. First- and second-year students choose from among POLSCI 101 (political theory), 111 (American government), 140 (comparative politics), 160 (world politics); juniors and seniors from POLSCI 301 and 302 (political theory), 311 (American government), advisor approval (comparative politics), and advisor approval (world politics).

Concentration Program. At least 24 credits in POLSCI (in addition to required prerequisites) and 6 credits elected through a cognate department.

Core courses must be elected from the 300-level or higher, including at least two at the 400-level. Twelve credits (including the two at the 400-level) must be taken in the department.

Only 9 hours of foreign credit from a one-term accredited program and 12 hours of foreign credit from a year-long program may be counted toward the concentration core.

No more than 4 credits of internship and 4 credits of directed study may be included in a concentration plan. Directed reading may not be counted as advanced unless approved beforehand by a concentration advisor.

Credit for STATS 250 (or 350) can count toward methods concentration requirements.

Seniors are encouraged to elect an undergraduate seminar (POLSCI 495, 496, 497, or 498). Law courses, with the exception of POLSCI 345 are counted in the American politics subfid. Political science concentrators are expected to acquire an appreciation of the diverse styles of political inquiry by electing at least one course in four of the following subfields: political theory, American government, comparative politics, world politics, and methodology. Normally, this requirement is satisfied by the prerequisites to concentration and different additional upper-level courses in two subfields. Cognate courses, which are upper-level courses in another discipline, are an integral part of the concentration plan and should be selected with a view toward building a coherent program of study. As a general rule, cognate courses should be in the same discipline with exceptions approved in advance by a concentration advisor.

Roster of POLSCI subfields and courses

  • American 111, 300, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324,326, 327, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 380, 385, 410, 432, 482, 484, 486, 496
  • Comparative 140, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 382, 387, 395, 396, 397, 451, 497
  • Methods 381, 391, 488, 490, 499
  • Theory 101, 301, 302, 306, 307, 308, 309, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 495
  • World 160, 360, 361, 363, 364, 365, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 379, 462, 463, 498

Honors Concentration. Especially well-qualified students are encouraged to undertake an Honors concentration. Such students elect the Honors proseminar (POLSCI 381) before their senior year and prepare a senior thesis under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Senior Seminars (POLSCI 493, 494) provide thesis credit. Students may count only two Honors courses toward the concentration core, one if a previous directed reading has been taken.

Normally, candidates for an Honors concentration must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in political science courses. 

Teaching Certificate. Students interested in obtaining a secondary teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Political Science should consult the "Teacher Certification Program" section in this Bulletin and the School of Education Teacher Education Office, 1228 School of Education Building, (734) 615-1528.

 

Political Science concentration (Winter 2007-Summer 2011) +

Effective Winter  2007-Summer 2011

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Prerequisites to Concentration. Two courses chosen from different subfields of political science. First- and second-year students choose from among POLSCI 101 (political theory), 111 (American government), 140 (comparative politics), 160 (world politics); juniors and seniors from POLSCI 301 and 302 (political theory), 310 (public policy and administration), 311 (American government), 336 or 349 (comparative politics), and 360 or 370 (world politics).

Concentration Program. At least 24 credits in POLSCI (in addition to required prerequisites) and 6 credits elected through a cognate department.

Core courses must be elected from the 300-level or higher, including at least two at the 400-level. Twelve credits (including the two at the 400-level) must be taken in the department.

Only 9 hours of foreign credit from a one-term accredited program and 12 hours of foreign credit from a year-long program may be counted toward the concentration core.

No more than 4 credits of internship and 4 credits of directed study may be included in a concentration plan. Directed reading may not be counted as advanced unless approved beforehand by a concentration advisor.

Credit for STATS 250 (or 350) can count toward methods concentration requirements.

Seniors are encouraged to elect an undergraduate seminar (POLSCI 495, 496, 497, or 498). Law courses, with the exception of POLSCI 345 are counted in the American politics subfid. Political science concentrators are expected to acquire an appreciation of the diverse styles of political inquiry by electing at least one course in four of the following subfields: political theory, American government, comparative politics, world politics, and methodology. Normally, this requirement is satisfied by the prerequisites to concentration and different additional upper-level courses in two subfields. Cognate courses, which are upper-level courses in another discipline, are an integral part of the concentration plan and should be selected with a view toward building a coherent program of study. As a general rule, cognate courses should be in the same discipline with exceptions approved in advance by a concentration advisor.

Roster of POLSCI subfields and courses

  • American 111, 300, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324,326, 327, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 380, 385, 410, 432, 482, 484, 486, 496
  • Comparative 140, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 382, 387, 395, 396, 397, 451, 497
  • Methods 381, 391, 488, 490, 499
  • Theory 101, 301, 302, 306, 307, 308, 309, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 495
  • World 160, 360, 361, 363, 364, 365, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 379, 462, 463, 498

 

Honors Concentration. Especially well-qualified students are encouraged to undertake an Honors concentration. Such students elect the Honors proseminar (POLSCI 381) before their senior year and prepare a senior thesis under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Senior Seminars (POLSCI 493, 494) provide thesis credit. Students may count only two Honors courses toward the concentration core, one if a previous directed reading has been taken.

Normally, candidates for an Honors concentration must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in political science courses. 

Teaching Certificate. Students interested in obtaining a secondary teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Political Science should consult the "Teacher Certification Program" section in this Bulletin and the School of Education Teacher Education Office, 1228 School of Education Building, (734) 615-1528.

Political Science concentration (Fall Term 2005 through Fall 2006) +

effective Fall Term 2005 through Fall 2006

Political Science

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Prerequisites to Concentration. Two courses chosen from different subfields of political science. First- and second-year students choose from among POLSCI 101 (political theory), 111 (American government), 140 (comparative politics), 160 (world politics); juniors and seniors from POLSCI 301 and 302 (political theory), 310 (public policy and administration), 311 (American government), 336 or 349 (comparative politics), and 360 or 370 (world politics).

Concentration Program. At least 24 credits in POLSCI (in addition to required prerequisites) and 6 elected through a cognate department.

The courses at the concentration core must be elected from the 300-level or higher, including at least two advanced courses at the 400-level. No more than 4 credits of internship and 4 credits of directed study may be included in a concentration plan. Directed reading and internship course work may not be counted as advanced unless approved in advance by a concentration advisor. Seniors are encouraged to elect an undergraduate seminar (POLSCI 495, 496, 497, or 498). Law courses, with the exception of POLSCI 345 are counted in the American politics subfield.

Political science concentrators are expected to acquire an appreciation of the diverse styles of political inquiry by electing at least one course in four of the following subfields: political theory, American government, comparative politics, world politics, and methodology. Normally, this requirement is satisfied by the prerequisites to concentration and different additional upper-level courses in two subfields. Cognate courses, which are upper-level courses in another discipline, are an integral part of the concentration plan and should be selected with a view toward building a coherent program of study. As a general rule, cognate courses should be in the same discipline with exceptions approved in advance by a concentration advisor. Only 9 hours of foreign credit from a one-term accredited program and 12 hours of foreign credit from a year-long program may be counted toward the concentration core. Students may use STATS 350 as a methods course in the concentration program.

Honors Concentration. Especially well-qualified students are encouraged to undertake an Honors concentration. Such students elect the Honors proseminar during the winter term of the junior year and prepare a senior thesis under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Senior Seminars (POLSCI 493, 494) provide thesis credit. Students may count only two Honors courses toward the concentration core, one if a previous directed reading has been taken.

Normally, candidates for an Honors concentration must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in political science courses. Interested students apply for the Honors program at the start of their junior year. Applications and information are available in the student office.

Teaching Certificate. Students interested in obtaining a secondary teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Political Science should consult the Teacher Certification Program" section in this Bulletin and the School of Education Office of Academic Services.

 

Political Science concentration (Fall Term 2002 through Summer 2005) +

 

effective Fall Term 2002 

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Prerequisites to Concentration. Two courses chosen from different subfields of political science. First- and second-year students choose from among POLSCI 101 (political theory), 111 (American government), 140 (comparative politics), 160 (world politics); juniors and seniors from POLSCI 301 and 302 (political theory), 310 (public policy and administration), 311 (American government), 336 or 349 (comparative politics), and 360 or 370 (world politics).

Concentration Program. At least 24 credits in POLSCI (in addition to required prerequisites) and 6 elected through a cognate department.

The courses at the concentration core must be elected from the 300-level or higher, including at least two courses at the 400-level. No more than 4 credits of internship and 4 credits of directed study may be included in a concentration plan. Seniors are encouraged to elect an undergraduate seminar (POLSCI 495, 496, 497, or 498). Law courses, with the exception of POLSCI 345 are counted in the American politics subfield.

Political science concentrators are expected to acquire an appreciation of the diverse styles of political inquiry by electing at least one course in four of the following subfields: political theory, American government, comparative politics, world politics, and methodology. Normally, this requirement is satisfied by the prerequisites to concentration and different additional upper-level courses in two subfields. Cognate courses, which are upper-level courses in another discipline, are an integral part of the concentration plan and should be selected with a view toward building a coherent program of study. As a general rule, cognate courses should be in the same discipline with exceptions approved in advance by a concentration advisor. Only 9 hours of foreign credit from a one-term accredited program and 12 hours of foreign credit from a year-long program may be counted toward the concentration core. Students may use STATS 350 as a methods course in the concentration program.

Honors Concentration. Especially well-qualified students are encouraged to undertake an Honors concentration. Such students elect the Honors proseminar during the winter term of the junior year and prepare a senior thesis under the direction of a faculty member in the Department. Senior Seminars (POLSCI 493, 494) provide thesis credit. Students may count only two Honors courses toward the concentration core, one if a previous directed reading has been taken.

Normally, candidates for an Honors concentration must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in political science courses. Interested students apply for the Honors program at the start of their junior year. Applications and information are available in the student office.

Teaching Certificate. Students interested in obtaining a secondary teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Political Science should consult the "Teacher Certification Program" section in this Bulletin and the School of Education Office of Academic Services.

Political Science concentration (Fall 2001-Summer 2002) +

 

Political Science

May be elected as a departmental concentration program

Prerequisites to Concentration. Two courses chosen from different subfields of political science. First- and second-year students choose from among Political Science 101 (political theory), 111 (American government), 140 (comparative politics), 160 (world politics); juniors and seniors from Political Science 400, 401, or 402 (political theory), 410 (public policy and administration), 411 (American government), 440, 450 or 465 (comparative politics), and 460 or 470 (world politics).

Concentration Program. At least 24 credits in political science (in addition to required prerequisites) and 6 elected through a cognate department.

One course in political science elected at the 300-level may be included in a concentration plan; all others must be at the 400-level or above. No more than 4 credits of internship and 4 credits of directed study may be included in a concentration plan. Seniors are encouraged to elect an undergraduate seminar (Political Science 495, 496, 497, or 498).

Political science concentrators are expected to acquire an appreciation of the diverse styles of political inquiry by electing at least one course in four of the following subfields: political theory, American government, comparative politics, world politics, and methodology. Normally, this requirement is satisfied by the prerequisites to concentration and different additional 400-level courses in two subfields. Cognate courses, which are upper-level courses in another discipline, are an integral part of the concentration plan and should be selected with a view toward building a coherent program of study. As a general rule, cognate courses should be in the same discipline with exceptions approved in advance by a concentration advisor. Only 8 hours of foreign credit from a one-term accredited program and 12 hours of foreign credit from a year-long program may be counted toward the concentration core. Students may use Statistics 350 as a methods course in the concentration program.

Honors Concentration. Especially well-qualified students are encouraged to undertake an Honors concentration. Such students elect the Honors proseminar during the winter term of the junior year and prepare a senior thesis under the direction of a faculty member in the department. Senior Seminars (493, 494) provide thesis credit. Students may count only two Honors courses toward the concentration core, one if a previous directed reading has been taken.

Normally, candidates for an Honors concentration must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 in political science courses. Interested students apply for the Honors program at the start of their junior year. Applications and information are available in the student office.

Teaching Certificate. Students interested in obtaining a secondary teaching certificate with a teaching major or minor in Political Science should consult the "Teacher Certification Program" section in this Bulletin and the School of Education Office of Academic Services.

 


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