Sweetland Podcast Series

SweetlandPodcastSeries

Sweetland Podcast Series: Topics in Writing

The Sweetland Podcast Series: Topics in Writing features interviews with guests at the Sweetland Seminar about current topics in the teaching of writing. Each of these guests, an expert in the field, is interviewed by T Hetzel, a member of the faculty at the Sweetland Center for Writing.



Writing Assessment

Born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Norbert Elliot was raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. He attended Brother Martin High School. He received both his BA and MA from the University of New Orleans and his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee. He has taught at Mercer County Community College, Rider University, the College of New Jersey, and Texas A & M University at Commerce. Since 1988 he has been a member of the Department of Humanities at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). His research and teaching interests cluster in the following areas: History, Practice, and Theory of Writing Assessment; Theory and Practice of Technical Communication; Biography; Theory and History of Environmental Rhetoric; Empirical Research Methods; Technology and Education.



Multilingual Writers in the University Classroom

Terry Myers Zawacki is professor emerita at George Mason University where she also directed the university’s highly ranked Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program and the University Writing Center. She has published on writing across the curriculum (WAC), writing in the disciplines (WID), writing assessment, writing centers, writing in international contexts, and WAC and second-language writing. Her publications include Engaged Writers and Dynamic Disciplines: Research on the Academic Writing Life, Writing Across the Curriculum: A Critical Sourcebook, the WAC and Second Language Writing special issue of Across the Disciplines, and the forthcoming WAC and Second Language Writers: Research towards Linguistically and Culturally Inclusive Programs and Practices. Her current research investigates the challenges faced by dissertation writers and their advisers across the disciplines.



Writing in Science

When Judy Swan was growing up, everyone told her she'd have to pick just one thing to do. But that's not been true; after starting out in scientific research, she now teaches writing to scientists at all levels in education, industry, and government. A graduate of Harvard University and MIT, Judy is currently an Associate Director of the Princeton Writing Program, where she gets to work with 18 different academic disciplines as she ponders why we all have so much trouble communicating with one another.



Transfer and Writing

Rebecca Nowacek is an Associate Professor and the Director of the Norman H. Ott Memorial Writing Center at Marquette University. Her research interests include: Transfer of writing related knowledge, Writing center research and administration, Interdisciplinary Curricula and Writing, and Writing Across the Curriculum Programs. She's especially interested in the question of "transfer"-- how writers connect what they know and who they are in one context with what they know and who they are in another context.



Writing Across the Curriculum

Mike Palmquist is Associate Vice Provost for Learning and Teaching, Professor of English, and University Distinguished Teaching Scholar at Colorado State University where he directs the University's Institute for Learning and Teaching. His scholarly interests include writing across the curriculum, the effects of computer and network technologies on writing instruction, and new approaches to scholarly publishing. Since 1992, he has coordinated the development of Writing@CSU and its web-based writing environment, the Writing Studio. He is also founding editor of the WAC Clearinghouse.



English Language Learners and Writing Instruction | Transcript (pdf download)

Christine Tardy is an assistant professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and Discourse and DePaul University in Chicago where she teaches undergraduate and graduate students in writing, writing and language teacher education, and genre and discourse related issues. Her research focuses on second language writing, genre and discourse studies, English-language policies, and politics, particularly related to writing and disciplinary writing development.



Machine Scoring of Writing | Transcript (pdf download)

Carl Whithaus is the director of the UC-Davis University Writing Program. He studies the impact of information technology on literacy practices, writing assessment, and writing in the sciences and engineering. His publications include "Teaching and Evaluating Writing in the Age of Computers and High Stakes Testing" and "Writing Across Distances and Disciplines: Research and Pedagogy in Distributed Learning." Carl earned his Ph.D. at the City University of New York. He has taught at Stevens Institute of Technology, Old Dominion University, and the University of California - Davis.